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If a Green 532 is the brightest then what's second brightest?

ultimatekaiser

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Interesting conversation, cant believe I've missed this. I miss being able to post more often.

Just my 2 cents-

I haven't seen IR as anything but red. but UV is mostly a very dim whiteish color to me, with just a slightly purple hue (though sometimes that is/may be very weak florescence in some cases but that usually results in a strong blue) I was always told that your night time eyesight peaked at about 510nm and your daytime vision peaked at about 550nm, which is the center of our vision if you go by the 400-700nm standard scale of human vision. most IR shows up to me as a faint unsaturated red color to me usually on a white surface.

Perceived brightness depends on a lot of things though, including the wavelength, angle of incidence vs viewing angle (detected diffuse light/scatter), power density (spot size and divergence), distance from the source, viewing environment brightness, minute differences between viewers (different people see slightly different), and lots of other factors probably too. It doesn't really come down to any one thing really.
 

Pman

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I have a lot of units with a lot of outputs and I've noticed a lot of what everyone is describing with the color shifting depending upon output, light in the room, divergence, dot and whether any other beams are on. The eye/brain is fascinating in how it interprets the shift in colors when there's a comparison with a change in one of the variables and it's not just the overall beam as it looks different to me from the outside edges through to the other edge. You can sometimes see this dramatically with the beam reflection/shadow (not sure what to call it) on a white or black background. You can of course see this on other colored backgrounds but it adds a lot of complication to this conversation.
 

steve001

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I already have a green 532 laser and I understand it's the brightest color of laser available.
If the 532 is the brightest then what's the next level down in brightness?
532 is not the brightest wavelength laser available. You could have a laser made to output 555nm. There are lasers outputting at 561nm which would make that the brightest off the shelf laser. And there are lasers outputting at 543 nm. So in reality ready made lasers of 561 would be brightest followed by 543 then 532.
 

Hap

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532 is not the brightest wavelength laser available. You could have a laser made to output 555nm. There are lasers outputting at 561nm which would make that the brightest off the shelf laser. And there are lasers outputting at 543 nm. So in reality ready made lasers of 561 would be brightest followed by 543 then 532.
^Pretty much. There are *some* 556nm labbies but not sure if those are really 556 or just 561 mislabeled.

-Alex
 
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Actually, 555nm is made by frequency summation of tge 946nm (known for the 473nm double) and the 1342nm (for 671nm) lines, which give 1/(1/1342+1/946)=554.87nm IIRC.
 

ultimatekaiser

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Actually, 555nm is made by frequency summation of tge 946nm (known for the 473nm double) and the 1342nm (for 671nm) lines, which give 1/(1/1342+1/946)=554.87nm IIRC.
you're correct. though LeHap is right. a lot of the ones CNI marketed in handheld to us spectrometered at 561nm. though that may be a temperature issue more than anything. as the two like to compete for lasing as they're close together, and 1123nm doubled is far stronger so it tends to come out on top if the mirrors aren't spot on. (and probably cheaper and easier to make mirror wise anyway) That and many applications can use either.
 
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Yeah true, my point was that 555nm labbies do actually exist. And as said, doubling is almost always the stronger than summation (which is much more temperature sensitive). This is also why some yellow pointers (both 589 and 593.5nm) sometimes have a 532nm line too.
 

ultimatekaiser

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Yeah true, my point was that 555nm labbies do actually exist. And as said, doubling is almost always the stronger than summation (which is much more temperature sensitive). This is also why some yellow pointers (both 589 and 593.5nm) sometimes have a 532nm line too.
some of them have way more than that. and even labbies do too. my 594 labby also outputs uW's of 671 and 532 as well alot of the time. which is why alot of equipment uses diffraction gratings or filters in them so you get only the line you want. -just in case-
 
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