Welcome to Laser Pointer Forums - discuss green laser pointers, blue laser pointers, and all types of lasers



Laser Pointer Store

I'd like to learn to take better beam shots

Joined
Dec 1, 2014
Messages
325
Likes
66
Points
0
Hi gang.
I know virtually nothing about cameras. I see beautiful photos by many of you.
Strong clear photos of 405nm, for example. Time lapse? I'd like to buy something better then my iPhone 6. My beam photos are embarrassing. :)
Complex subject. People spend lifetimes learning this stuff, I know
Perhaps someone could suggest a simple camera. Willing to spend a few hundred . ( nothing to real photographers) I'd like to start by getting some good 405 beam shots, I wouldn't be ashamed to post.
I know it is or can be a very expensive new hobby. For now, till I learn,Any suggestions ? A lot of light pollution where I live. Nice big park near me,though.
Thanks a bunch
 

BowtieGuy

Well-known member
LPF Site Supporter
Joined
Oct 14, 2012
Messages
5,305
Likes
1,819
Points
113
Davidx, You're right, there are a lot of great beam shot photos out there, and some are taken with expensive high quality cameras, but IMO, if you don't have anything but a decent phone camera, you can still take a decent beam shot photo.
Your iphone has a good camera; be sure and play with all the manual functions to get the best results.

The best thing that I found for taking beam shot pics indoors, is a fog machine, even the low cost ones will do the job.
It just so happens, that between now and the week or two after Halloween, is probably the best time of the year to get a fog machine. The very best deals are after Halloween, but you risk a chance of not getting the one you want.
 
Joined
Mar 22, 2015
Messages
577
Likes
103
Points
0
instead of a fog machine, i just heat up pure glycerin or vegetable glycerin on a stove/hotplate/whatever and keep blowing on it once it starts making steam. if you evaporate a single drop you can easily fill up a whole room with nice fog, and it really brings the beams out.
 
Last edited:

brucemir

Well-known member
LPF Site Supporter
Joined
Aug 3, 2012
Messages
1,189
Likes
895
Points
113
I think what you need is a camera that has manual controls (shutter speed, f stop). Before I was using a DSLR, I used a Canon SX-40 for the photographing of lasers and got very nice results. A camera like that will cost about 250 to 400 dollars. Also a shutter release cable and tripod would be very helpful. Then you have to learn the camera and start experimenting. You take a few pics and if they are too dark you make adjustments, and the same if it is too light. If you are shooting indoors I too, would recommend a fog machine. I use mine every week and so little fog is needed to enhance the beams, a quart lasts me at least six months. Mine cost me 40 dollars and still works fine after 3 years. Lastly, you always need to make sure the camera and laser(s) are in fixed positions and you will get the photographs you desire.
 
Joined
Dec 1, 2014
Messages
325
Likes
66
Points
0
Thanks, lower shutter speed is what I was thinking of.

Smoke machine I got on Amazon for'$30. Second purchase after my LPM.
Kid next door loves it.
 
Last edited:

Gabe

Well-known member
Joined
Jan 10, 2015
Messages
1,189
Likes
301
Points
83
Also, for anybody who doesn't want to but a camera and would rather use the camera on their iPad or iPhone, you should DEFINITELY play with some photo editing apps, as well as some long exposure photo apps. Some you do have to pay for, and you want get as good results as a DSLR camera, but they're pretty worth it in my opinion.
 

RedCowboy

Well-known member
LPF Site Supporter
Joined
Jul 10, 2015
Messages
6,836
Likes
1,654
Points
113
You don't need a fancy cam, just a 100 dollar Wal-Mart digital cam on sale for 50 bucks and in a low lit room use just a little smoke, light an incense stick and wave it around, just burn an inch or 2, it doesn't take much and you don't want a foggy pic.
Then experiment with your cam, make sure it is stationary, if you don't use a tripod the set it down.
Beams look stronger coming than going and blocking lens flare with a tube at the aperture can help a lot.
Experiment, but be careful, never set a round body laser where it can roll, never expose yourself to eye injury and don't become complacent.
 




Top