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Home Spectroscopy - Any Ides?

HaloBlu

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Tho I would recommend using a camera instead of your eye. :D
Sorry, wasn't clear there at all (smiley really didn't help). I meant with a camera you might have a chance of detecting a difference in two Blu-rays. Haven't tried it tho.



Although they say camera color sensitivity skews the intensity shown on the plot that shouldn't matter with the sharp line diode lasers create.
 
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HIMNL9

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As far as calibration goes: you can use a 532 green laser for that, those are accurate to the nanometer regardless of conditions or quality.

Observing the reflected dot can be a problem with blurays in particular, you need to find a totally non-fluorescent surface to do that properly.
Sandblasted aluminium ..... not coated or anodized, just bare sandblasted aluminium, it's not fluorescent and still reflect a lot of light ..... the only problem is that time by time you need to re-sand it or change it, cause it slowly oxidize.
 

HaloBlu

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Often this style of scope isn't good enough to see 405 vs 410. You would need a good eye to see that in this style meter.
Do we know a freak high wavelength Blu-ray can go up to 410nm? Or is that more of an educated guess of the range?

If the range is as much as 400-410nm that certainly appears to be detectable when comparing spectrum pictures from a camera.

The line from a red
is narrow enough at least. Seems you could see a 2-3nm difference perhaps if not better.

~EDIT~
Just saw Xplorer877 new thread http://laserpointerforums.com/f44/single-slit-diffraction-spectroscopy-my-attempt-calculate-wavelengths-50334.html#post690964
 
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