Welcome to Laser Pointer Forums - discuss green laser pointers, blue laser pointers, and all types of lasers



Has any purchased the O-Like High Power 500mW 532nm green laser?

paul1598419

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 20, 2013
Messages
15,686
Points
113
I'm reasonably sure that particular module doesn't use an IR filter. I would expect about 16% of the output power to be IR, but not well collimated. So, it won't be much of an eye hazard past 5 or 6 feet.
 



badboybilly

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 5, 2015
Messages
1,330
Points
113
Anytime I see someone after a high power 532 I’m goimg to jump in and recommend Lasever, Simply becouse I was very impressed with there 700mw module for only $300!

Great quality, great divergence, and very simple to incorporate into your own housing of choice, I wouldn’t bother with any other modules of lower power, if it’s the actuall housing-host you prefer then yeah spend more money on a complete build!
 

Attachments

Last edited:

Pelagius

Active member
Joined
Jul 1, 2018
Messages
295
Points
43
Thanks- I hope so! Cheapie 532 nm low power lasers seem to have them hit or miss from what I'm reading-
I'll see if I can ask 0-Like

Pelagius, I don't know if they use IR filters?? Iv'e recently took a peak at "Discord" and they are mentioning O- like is having logging on issues but you can try reaching O-like.
 

Benm

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 16, 2007
Messages
8,113
Points
113
I'm reasonably sure that particular module doesn't use an IR filter. I would expect about 16% of the output power to be IR, but not well collimated. So, it won't be much of an eye hazard past 5 or 6 feet.
The degree of co-collimation of IR leaking and visible light is a bit difficult to gauge and varies between dpss lasers as well. Usually i would not expect the 808 nm pump light to be collimated with the green 532 nm output.

This, however, has 2 consequences for powerful lasers:

- at very close range you could still suffer eye damage if you use goggles that block 532 but not 808 or 1064.

- at longer ranges you may still be exposed to dangerous amounts of IR even if the visible beam does not hit you.

The latter could be a realistic problem with higher powered units - you can clearly see the green beam and avoid looking directly into that, but if you let it just graze the size of your head, you might still be getting significant IR exposure when not wearing protective goggles.

I've never heard of anyone being actually injured by the latter scenario, but it doesn't seem impossible either with pump powers of a few watts in portable lasers.
 

paul1598419

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 20, 2013
Messages
15,686
Points
113
Even if you had 160 mW of diverging IR, it will likely not do you harm if the beam grazes your head as its profile would be in the 50 inch^2 range. Even double that power wouldn't be harmful as only a tiny fraction of that power would make it past the pupil in your eye.
 

Pelagius

Active member
Joined
Jul 1, 2018
Messages
295
Points
43
Thanks Benm and Paul,

So if you are a few feet from the focal point- the IR splash from a non-reflective surface would not be problematic?
" at very close range you could still suffer eye damage if you use goggles that block 532 but not 808 or 1064."
I'm thinking for peace of mind or eye- I should go with JetLasers-or just stay with my 520 nm diode laser.
Anyway-thanks!
Eric-er I mean Darth Pelagius. :)



Even if you had 160 mW of diverging IR, it will likely not do you harm if the beam grazes your head as its profile would be in the 50 inch^2 range. Even double that power wouldn't be harmful as only a tiny fraction of that power would make it past the pupil in your eye.
The degree of co-collimation of IR leaking and visible light is a bit difficult to gauge and varies between dpss lasers as well. Usually i would not expect the 808 nm pump light to be collimated with the green 532 nm output.

This, however, has 2 consequences for powerful lasers:

- at very close range you could still suffer eye damage if you use goggles that block 532 but not 808 or 1064.

- at longer ranges you may still be exposed to dangerous amounts of IR even if the visible beam does not hit you.

The latter could be a realistic problem with higher powered units - you can clearly see the green beam and avoid looking directly into that, but if you let it just graze the size of your head, you might still be getting significant IR exposure when not wearing protective goggles.

I've never heard of anyone being actually injured by the latter scenario, but it doesn't seem impossible either with pump powers of a few watts in portable lasers.
 




Top