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For Sale: 5-8mW 589 nm pointer

CurtisOliver

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i have managed to convince them to start working on some 1-5mw 571nm modules
571nm would be interesting wavelength. It’s 9nm away from true yellow just like 589nm. But it will have noticeably more green than 574/575nm. But far enough away from 565 and definitely 561nm to be uniquely different to justify owning it.
 



Sowee7

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571nm would be interesting wavelength. It’s 9nm away from true yellow just like 589nm. But it will have noticeably more green than 574/575nm. But far enough away from 565 and definitely 561nm to be uniquely different to justify owning it.
I do have a 571nm laser, it is an interesting wavelength, to me it's yellow with a hint of green, like 75% yellow and 25% green
 

CurtisOliver

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I do have a 571nm laser, it is an interesting wavelength, to me it's yellow with a hint of green, like 75% yellow and 25% green
I’ve recently got hold of an old spectrophotometer with a monochromator inside. I can cycle through the entire spectrum and have been viewing what certain wavelengths I don’t own actually look like. I may be able to get hold of a 575nm one day. Probably was around 5-10% green depending on the lighting.

What I found interesting is how perfect values like 580 and 490nm held up for being the sweet spot for yellow and cyan.

Also just like cyan. Perfect yellow also varies with lighting conditions and previous observations of lower and higher wavelengths. After observing lower wavelengths for a while. Even 580nm looked dark yellow/light orange. A bit like 589nm.
 

paul1598419

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I’ve recently got hold of an old spectrophotometer with a monochromator inside. I can cycle through the entire spectrum and have been viewing what certain wavelengths I don’t own actually look like. I may be able to get hold of a 575nm one day. Probably was around 5-10% green depending on the lighting.

What I found interesting is how perfect values like 580 and 490nm held up for being the sweet spot for yellow and cyan.

Also just like cyan. Perfect yellow also varies with lighting conditions and previous observations of lower and higher wavelengths. After observing lower wavelengths for a while. Even 580nm looked dark yellow/light orange. A bit like 589nm.

My 574nm laser has always looked lemon yellow to me no matter what the light conditions are around it. That is as long as the light is mostly white in the room. I suppose if you lit a room mostly red, green or blue this could change the appearance of any laser.
 

CurtisOliver

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My 574nm laser has always looked lemon yellow to me no matter what the light conditions are around it. That is as long as the light is mostly white in the room. I suppose if you lit a room mostly red, green or blue this could change the appearance of any laser.
It’s possible you would notice it if you viewed 580nm. But without it as a reference you probably wouldn’t notice much of a difference. I was able to dial back and forth across the yellow part of the spectrum. And observations definitely altered based on what wavelengths i viewed before it and how dim the room was.
 

julianthedragon

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My theory about why observed color of wavelengths varies-
Lasers are unique for our eyes in that they produce a very narrow, constant, frequency band. Both narrow and constant are important.
When ambient light conditions change, our perception changes with them. For example, when our eyes are well adjusted, a white bowl in daylight and the same white bowl under tungsten lighting will both appear white, even though the latter is more orange. However the color of a laser can’t change (since it is light itself), and it is a narrow enough band of light for us to notice (unlike colorful lamp or LED). So for instance, when we transition from daylight to tungsten lighting, a 580nm that seemed a lemon-yellow color outside will now appear a golden 589 color, because it is “stuck” at its true color, 580nm, while your eyes have adjusted to a warmer light by adding blue. And finally, this effect is magnified in the parts of the visible spectrum that change color quickly with change in wavelength, such as yellow-green and cyan.

Edit- I’m still thinking about the accuracy of my example. I should actually try this to confirm, just a hypothesis right now. Gets confusing thinking about all the opposite blue/orange shifts and what stays constant and what doesn’t. But you get the idea
 
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kecked

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I did the same with a dye laser and 577nm is the sweet spot for my eyes. I however was in a dark room where everything around me was black. You will be able to call the wavelength of stop lights and flashing yellow lights if you practice.
 




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