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Finally... I own a 2W 577nm!

ultimatekaiser

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Mar 10, 2013
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Yeah particles are bad, but it goes even further than that, the fibers alone in the cloth are abrasive and never fully clean generally speaking either, so any contact invariably causes at least some scratching, even if you cant see it. This is an application where being a clean freak is actually a bit of a detriment more often than not. ‘Clean’ is a relative term. You dont want to micromanage lenses on lasers, they just need to be clean enough to perform. The more you clean it, the worse it gets, as its just going to get dirty again, and the rougher surface is going to degrade performance further as well as hold onto particles even better. If it does its job, then leave it be.
 



liveforphysics

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Jun 19, 2010
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124
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28
Thank you for the tips on laser optic cleaning. What do you think about options like "first contact" polymer optic surface cleaner? Its something rubbery you gently apply like nail polish and peel off. I have a plasma cleaner at the RnD lab, does anyone know if it etches the optic away as it cleans?
 

kecked

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Jun 18, 2012
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I’ve used first contact and had good results on dichro and hard coated lens. Never tried plasma. My favorite for single lens is optical grade methanol followed by acetone and let it dry. I’ve also use an ultrasonic cleaner with freon but that is hard to find these days. Honestly soapy water followed by acetone to just take the water away is good too. What doesn’t work is any form of scrubbing. If you have a glued optic I’d be thinking hard before cleaning but the single wipe cotton swab with solvent or optical papers can also work. I tend to just clean where the beam is. If there is crap in the corner who cares.
 

RedCowboy

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Jul 10, 2015
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I use ZEISS lens wipes in the individual foil packs that come pre moistened with something that dries streak free and I use a soft touch, so far I have had good results.

That and I use a turkey baster squeeze bulb I modified to blow air onto optics to clear dust/particulate.

This looks good > https://www.ebay.com/itm/392847379373?hash=item5b77874bad:g:QYgAAOSwUV9Wn1tp

Maybe even better > https://www.ebay.com/itm/174297380099?hash=item2894eef503:g:DRwAAOSw9N1VrqFj

Here's the good stuff ( I have not used it myself yet but I expect you could apply it via. gravity without using a brush ) > https://www.edmundoptics.com/f/firs...k664YjVL7Fr4bRFSreUkzXfPZat6B6EcaAtFqEALw_wcB

 
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Eidetical

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May 14, 2022
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63
Points
33
Wiping optics to clean them (or blowing off with canned "air" or even a puffer) builds up a static charge that attracts future particles to the surface. It's like a magnet! I use an ionizing air gun with a tank of nitrogen for cleaning glass substrates before mounting holographic film to it in a really dirty environment. It prevents particles from settling and causing bubbles. I'll be experimenting with a loaner CO2 "snow-cleaning" system in the next few weeks to see how that works for large telescope mirrors and for small coated optics.
 

Shakenawake

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Mar 11, 2013
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Wow. Don't you live in CO? Wouldn't mind visiting some time. That's so cool, and so are your other wavelengths
 

ultimatekaiser

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Mar 10, 2013
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2,915
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yeah, cleaning optics is literally both a science and an art in and of itself, and entire series' of textbooks can be dedicated to the subject. its....quite vast.
 




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