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Coherent LaserCheck > 1W?

Izord

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I have a Coherent LaserCheck, Handheld Power Meter.

It can measure from 0.5 microWatts to 10 mW with it's native Silicon Cell Sensor, and it has a built in 1mm-thick NG-10 Attenuator that extends it's range up to 1 Watt.

How can I use it to measure laser power greater than 1 Watt?

I'm interested in the 1 Watt to 2 Watt range.

Here's a link to the device: Coherent Inc. LaserCheck is a hand-held laser power meter.

Thanks.
 



ARG

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Maybe you can email coherent support and ask? There's only a few people on the forums with coherent power meters.
 

Izord

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Maybe you can email coherent support and ask? There's only a few people on the forums with coherent power meters.
OK, I wondered if there was some known technique for reducing a laser beam by a given amount so that it could be measured by a smaller meter.

Like the built in attenuator does.
 

lasersbee

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OK, I wondered if there was some known technique for reducing a laser beam by a given amount so that it could be measured by a smaller meter.

Like the built in attenuator does.
Your LaserCheck already does that by sliding an ND filter
in front of the Raw Optical Sensor. That increases the range
100 fold. Don't forget that when you slide the internal Filter
a swicth is activated to let the firmware know that the filter
is in place over the sensor.

Theoretically you could take a 2nd identical type of filter
and place it in front of your LPMs filter and get another 100
fold increase in power to 100 watts.
But the firmware would not be aware of the decrease or
exact characteristics on the new additional filter and your
resolution would suffer.

As was mentioned... Contact Coherent for the best advise.

Are you aware that near the low end of the LC's wavelength
range the LaserCheck has been known to becomes inaccurate
in posts by some members.

BTW... yes I still have 2 of them..


Jerry

You can contact us at any time on our Website: J.BAUER Electronics
 
Last edited:

Izord

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Your LaserCheck already does that by sliding an ND filter
in front of the Raw Optical Sensor. That increases the range
100 fold. Don't forget that when you slide the internal Filter
a swicth is activated to let the firmware know that the filter
is in place over the sensor.

Theoretically you could take a 2nd identical type of filter
and place it in front of your LPMs filter and get another 100
fold increase in power to 100 watts.
But the firmware would not be aware of the decrease or
exact characteristics on the new additional filter and your
resolution would suffer.

As was mentioned... Contact Coherent for the best advise.

Are you aware that near the low end of the LC's wavelength
range the LaserCheck has been known to becomes inaccurate
in posts by some members.

BTW... yes I still have 2 of them..


Jerry
Thanks.
 

Benm

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You can use any neutral density filter to extend the range, as long as the laser beam doesnt damage the filter.

Perhaps something like this:

http://www.amazon.com/Hoya-Multi-Coated-Neutral-Density-Filter/dp/B0000AI1FX/ref=sr_1_9?s=photo&ie=UTF8&qid=1340018495&sr=1-9&keywords=nd8

It would extend the power range by a factor of 8, and obviously you need to multiply the reading on the LPM by 8 to get the correct result.

A ND10 filter would be more practical (just shift the decimal point 1 position), but those aren't commonly available is in photography these things go in multiples of 2 to keep sync with the stops on a camera.
 

lasersbee

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You can use any neutral density filter to extend the range, as long as the laser beam doesnt damage the filter.

Perhaps something like this:

Amazon.com: Hoya 52mm HMC ND8 Multi-Coated Neutral Density Filter: Camera & Photo

It would extend the power range by a factor of 8, and obviously you need to multiply the reading on the LPM by 8 to get the correct result.

A ND10 filter would be more practical (just shift the decimal point 1 position), but those aren't commonly available is in photography these things go in multiples of 2 to keep sync with the stops on a camera.
That is a photographic full visible spectrum ND Filter..

As I've posted in the past... we have used and tested
these photographic type ND filters in the Shop and
have found that they are not linear over the full visible
spectrum range.

They can be used but must be tested to find their actual
power reduction ratio (factor) for the specific wavelength
of the Laser you are metering.


Jerry

You can contact us at any time on our Website: J.BAUER Electronics
 
Last edited:

Benm

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Technically that would mean they are not neutral density, but then again, they could be 'close enough' for photography use.

How much of a difference did you find in attenuation between wavelengths when testing them?
 

Izord

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You can use any neutral density filter to extend the range, as long as the laser beam doesnt damage the filter.

Perhaps something like this:

Amazon.com: Hoya 52mm HMC ND8 Multi-Coated Neutral Density Filter: Camera & Photo

It would extend the power range by a factor of 8, and obviously you need to multiply the reading on the LPM by 8 to get the correct result.

A ND10 filter would be more practical (just shift the decimal point 1 position), but those aren't commonly available is in photography these things go in multiples of 2 to keep sync with the stops on a camera.

How about this one? It's also glass and cheaper? Amazon.com: Zykkor 58mm Pro Slim Neutral Density ND4 0.6 ND 4 Optical Glass Filter: Camera & Photo
 

Benm

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That would extend the range by a factor of 4, but you could always use 2 of them to go for a factor of 16.

The link i posted was just an example though, you should shop around to find good deals on these. Espcially in this application where it doesn't matter if the diameter fits your camera, there is a lot of choice.
 




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