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100% uv sunglass blocks 405nm

t580

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I recently bought a cheap pair of sunglasses that stated they block 100% uv rays. While playing with one of my blurays i first thought the diode blew but when i took them off i was surprised how well they worked. Anyone else notice this or try it.
 



pHeneX

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Yes i noticed this also, but dont think that they are a replacement for real safety glasses.
 

Seoul_lasers

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Only a proper LPM will be able to tell you weather or not the glasses work properly.
My guess is 100% UV filters will be able to do the job safely, but I wouldn't be sure unless this is tested in a lab setting.
 

hugo999999

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another thing to consider is how long they will hold against the laser from a reflection or direct hit.
 

mikeeey

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i wonder how many mW it will let through of 1W 445nm lawl
 

Meatball

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Please avoid using sunglasses. They darken a LOT of wavelengths. This results in the iris in your eye to expand, trying to let in more light. This increases your chances for a DIRECT hit to enter through the pupil. This is not a good situation considering that we have no idea HOW LONG these sunglasses can hold a DIRECT HIT.

View the dot with goggles/sunglasses is VERY different when it's sitting on your face!

I suspect that these block LOTs of colors, making the BR appear very dim.
 

Asherz

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no no no no no no.

BAD idea, but if you want to damage your ONLY pair of eyes that's your choice.

It's been said time and time again on this forum, welding goggles, sunglasses or any thing other than certified goggles WILL NOT protect your eyes, a violet laser would go through the coating on those glasses in under a second.
 

Eidetic

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Most laser accidents happen with pulsed and/or invisible beam lasers. Controlling the beam path by safe handling techniques is waaaaaay easier with visible beam lasers. If the laser's in your hand, YOU're in control of where the beam path is. Be responsible. If you're not wearing goggles, keep the beam off or moving. If all you have is sunglasses, keep the beam moving. As you move it, focus on what it's hitting and move from safe spot to safe spot. It's your job to move it safely.

If you mount a laser rigidly so you can do something with the beam, put the beam through a variable attenuator so you can work with the light safely until you need the power. Be safe with where the beam goes and it won't matter what kind of protection you have over your eyes because a beam will never go there. And when it does, it won't be serious.
 

daguin

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If you use hand-held lasers (especially inside), you WILL eventually be hit in the eye with a specular reflection. After it happens is too late to put on your goggles.

Peace,
dave
 

Meatball

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Most laser accidents happen with pulsed and/or invisible beam lasers. Controlling the beam path by safe handling techniques is waaaaaay easier with visible beam lasers. If the laser's in your hand, YOU're in control of where the beam path is. Be responsible. If you're not wearing goggles, keep the beam off or moving. If all you have is sunglasses, keep the beam moving. As you move it, focus on what it's hitting and move from safe spot to safe spot. It's your job to move it safely.

If you mount a laser rigidly so you can do something with the beam, put the beam through a variable attenuator so you can work with the light safely until you need the power. Be safe with where the beam goes and it won't matter what kind of protection you have over your eyes because a beam will never go there. And when it does, it won't be serious.


:wtf:

:banghead:

Contradictions in a shaky piece of laser safety advice are dangerous if left alone. It is simply MUCH easier to ALWAYS wear eye protection. Us hobbyists don't have variable attenuators sitting around for our pointers.
 

Asherz

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Most laser accidents happen with pulsed and/or invisible beam lasers. Controlling the beam path by safe handling techniques is waaaaaay easier with visible beam lasers. If the laser's in your hand, YOU're in control of where the beam path is. Be responsible. If you're not wearing goggles, keep the beam off or moving. If all you have is sunglasses, keep the beam moving. As you move it, focus on what it's hitting and move from safe spot to safe spot. It's your job to move it safely.

If you mount a laser rigidly so you can do something with the beam, put the beam through a variable attenuator so you can work with the light safely until you need the power. Be safe with where the beam goes and it won't matter what kind of protection you have over your eyes because a beam will never go there. And when it does, it won't be serious.

Where safety goggles end of discussion, there's no two ways about it when dealing with lasers <5mW. If you choose to risk your own eyes by not wearing them do not promote it here on the forum.
 

Thengine

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Where safety goggles end of discussion, there's no two ways about it when dealing with lasers <5mW. If you choose to risk your own eyes by not wearing them do not promote it here on the forum.

*Wear* safety goggles. there's no two ways about it when dealing with lasers *>5mW.*

If you choose to give advice that is not correct then do not promote it here on the forum.
 

Seoul_lasers

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That's what he meant.

Wear safety goggles around lasers that are greater than IIIa. Good solid piece of advice. I have been the victim of an idiot kid(s) with a green laser pointer. When I taught in BC, I had a student how somehow managed to get ahold of a cheapie 20mW green laser that was bought on ebay. Students decided to play laser tag with it, as they clearly had no idea how powerful it truly was. I got hit indirectly in the face by a reflection when the students were messing around with it in the metal shop trying to reflect beams off shiny things!!!! They were suspended and charged with bringing a dangerous device onto public property. My vision fully recovered, but I suffered migrane headaches for about 1 month after.

Wear goggles. You don't need the kind of experience I have had.
 

Eidetic

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That's a good story Seoul_Lasers, and I don't mean to diminish your experience, but I disagree on the important lesson to take from it. I think the lesson is to keep lasers out of the hands of those who don't know what they are. I think another equally important lesson is to leave a room when there's someone acting irresponsibly with a laser. Or look toward the floor, as I do whenever I see someone wave a beam around or put something into the beam (which I never allow to happen if it's MY beam). Do you propose we all wear safety goggles for all colors when we go into a classroom, club or concert?

Real safety comes from control of the beam path, not protection on your eyes. And I'm not saying goggles aren't important, they are. I'm saying that if you wear goggles, you're safe. If you control your beam, everybody's safe.
 

Benm

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The concept of sunglasses blocking bluray has come up before... some of them do, some of them don't, but you never know long long they will hold or how much they actually attenuate.

I have a pair of sunglasses here that seem to attenuate bluray as much as they do any other color (the lenses are faily gray). There was no mention of UV blocking ability on these though.

One other factor is polarisation: If you have polarized sunglasses, they will block laser light under certain angles. Rotating the laser results in varying brightness of what makes it through.
 

arringtj

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what safety glasses would block 405nm but enhance the UV glow of diamonds?
 




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