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Would something like this be possible?

Tinkerer thinkerer

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Would it be possible to build a more laser module like an infrared thermometer that could heat something or burn while measuring it? Or can lasers not reliably measure the ambient temperature at those higher levels than an infrared thermometer? I don't want something super crazy just a 5 -7mw. I don't want it to measure a huge space like a room but just a 20 - 30 mm tube.
 



T_Warne

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Lasers can measure temperature? :unsure:
Why are you inventing unnecessary equipment when it is already easy to measure temperature with existing tools?
Perhaps you can explain EXACTLY what you are trying to accomplish so we can better understand your experiment?
 

Encap

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Lasers are not thermometers/do not measure temperature.
Infrared Thermometers just use a low output laser diode to show where you are pointing the device. What/where the device is reading the temperature from.
See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Infrared_thermometer

PS A laser beam has no temperature - there is no inherent "temperature" to a laser beam. Heat is produced by the random motion of matter particles (atomic or molecular particles). A laser beam itself is not made of matter but of photons, which have no mass, thus a laser beam can have no temperature. "Heat" is caused by a laser beams energy being absorbed by a materials surface and turning light energy into heat energy which depends on many factors efficiency of the target's absorption of the laser wavelength among others--
 
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Richie89

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PS A laser beam has no temperature - there is no inherent "temperature" to a laser beam. Heat is produced by the random motion of matter particles (atomic or molecular particles). A laser beam itself is not made of matter but of photons, which have no mass, thus a laser beam can have no temperature. "Heat" is caused by a laser beams energy being absorbed by a materials surface and turning light energy into heat energy which depends on many factors efficiency of the target's absorption of the laser wavelength among others--
thats absolutely crazy you saying this, because many years ago before i knew anything about lasers I had this theory of lasers beams not actually carrying "heat" or having no actual temperature in the beam itself because of an experiment I tried on myself. I had 2 lasers, a 638nm and a 445nm. both had almost the exact same output, tested on a meter, the 638 was 538mw and the 445 had just a little over 500, I think it was 508, so 30 ish mw difference. I was trying to figure out how much heat they were producing (before I found out they produced no heat) and I fired them both onto my hand, well the blue one immediately burned me and I ripped my hand away within a sec. well the Red one didnt burn at all, just a small tingle. i was shocked! so that was when i figured out that they had no actual heat in the beam, I honestly thought that logic told me that they were the same power they should produce the same amount of heat in the beam. i knew they were on the oppisite side of the spectrum and the energy density was much higher the lower you go. Yeah i guess at that time i didnt know that the energy in the beam itself causes things to heat up and my hand wasnt absorbing the red light like the blue was.
anyways, sorry man. to sum it up, i just thought it was cool to see you say that because I didnt know this was the case so long ago and my little experiment proved it to myself before I figured out you all already knew it.
 

Tinkerer thinkerer

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Lasers are not thermometers/do not measure temperature.
Infrared Thermometers just use a low output laser diode to show where you are pointing the device. What/where the device is reading the temperature from.
See:

PS A laser beam has no temperature - there is no inherent "temperature" to a laser beam. Heat is produced by the random motion of matter particles (atomic or molecular particles). A laser beam itself is not made of matter but of photons, which have no mass, thus a laser beam can have no temperature. "Heat" is caused by a laser beams energy being absorbed by a materials surface and turning light energy into heat energy which depends on many factors efficiency of the target's absorption of the laser wavelength among others--
Honestly, I knew it wasn't the laser that detected temperature. Though I was not aware of the spectrum being the decisive fact on its heating factor. So ideally you want something in the ultraviolet as opposed to the IR spectrum. Makes sense when you're talking about wavelengths. I should have worded my question better. I was just wondering if it was possible to measure the ambient temperature with a high-power laser. I want to program an SoC to heat up vapor liquids to make a vape merely as a proof of concept I would NEVER advocate using it. I just want to see if it can be done. The modding part of vapor cigs has pretty much died so I'm just having fun.
 

T_Warne

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I'm even more confused now. Are you trying to heat something up with a laser, or measure it's temperature? ( lasers don't measure temperature)

Trying to heat vape juice will be challenging. It's mostly transparent. You need to find a wavelength that is absorbed efficiently by the liquid.

You might be able to use a laser to heat something and that heated thing will evaporate the juice. Kinda' like electricity heating a coil.

But I'm still not clear about what heat you are trying to measure, or why you would want a laser to do it? ( lasers don't measure temperature)

This is sounding like you have a science fiction solution to a problem that does not really exist.
 




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