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ArcticMyst Security by Avery

Test load tips but not laser related

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Jan 14, 2021
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Hey guys, I have a lithium battery on my motorcycle and when weather gets cold the engine struggling to start... I know that this is a common issue on lithium batteries so I want to find a dummy but relatively heavy load that will be attached for a little time on the battery and will warm it up...
Any suggestions about something compact, size wise?
 





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Apr 23, 2011
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Sorry, not really answering your question as I really know little to nothing on test loads. But if it's a standard sized battery, maybe switch back to a conventional battery during cold weather?

A couple years ago I had an 89 Sportster 883 that was my only vehicle for almost two years I rode through the winter. Conventional battery which worked great in the summer, and replaced in the winter to get back to firing right up. I'd looked at going lithium, but too much for me at the time and other areas needed attention more.

What about a small 12v heating pad to put under or on the side of the battery? Heat and place a load, although depending on how cold the little heat for a short time likely wouldn't warm it much. Could also put the pad on the seat to warm that up for ya lol.
I've seen people living "van life" do this to keep their house batteries warm during the winter. Well, the ones using LiFePO4 batteries anyway.
 
Joined
Jan 14, 2021
Messages
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Points
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Sorry, not really answering your question as I really know little to nothing on test loads. But if it's a standard sized battery, maybe switch back to a conventional battery during cold weather?

A couple years ago I had an 89 Sportster 883 that was my only vehicle for almost two years I rode through the winter. Conventional battery which worked great in the summer, and replaced in the winter to get back to firing right up. I'd looked at going lithium, but too much for me at the time and other areas needed attention more.

What about a small 12v heating pad to put under or on the side of the battery? Heat and place a load, although depending on how cold the little heat for a short time likely wouldn't warm it much. Could also put the pad on the seat to warm that up for ya lol.
I've seen people living "van life" do this to keep their house batteries warm during the winter. Well, the ones using LiFePO4 batteries anyway.
I 've thought the lead-acid for the winter but I also believe that it 's a waste of money having a battery sitting for half a year. What I 've been taught for the machines and tools is that "if something is being used for it 's purpose will last much more than something that will sit at the corner waiting!".... Just think what will happen to a lead-acid battery... And I know for sure that I m not going to plug the battery to the charger to let some current to flow... So that's why I m choosing to find a "portable" load that will sit under my seat and will be plugged on the cold days!
 
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Yeah, true enough on a battery sitting half the year or more!

I'd think you could just use resistors, but you'd have to define "heavy load" and use a resistor or a resistor bank to place the desired load on the battery. I'd also think that it would have to be heatsinked unless you get some fairly large resistors. That's why I was suggesting the heat pad, it does put a load on the battery, maybe even enough to get the ole internal juices warmed.

How cold is getting in your neck of the woods? I'm wondering if using lithium batteries in cold weather w/o proper temperature maintenance is shortening it's life. I forget what the lower range is, but below a certain temp they won't take a charge.

Here's a simple DIY load tester, you could do something similar with actual resistors instead of the resistance of the wire coil he's using:
 
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Even they still have "Working Charge Temp 0~50°C"
So if you're below 32F for any length of time, you'll only be depleting your battery w/o recharging it.
Unless of course your putting it on a charger overnight.

May want to/couldn't hurt to check with the manufacturer/supplier for suggestionsd as well check operating temp range of your battery.
It likely has a built in BMS, some will have thermal cut-offs for charging if it gets too cold but that may be more for the DIY BMS not the all in one cased ones for MC/Car use.
 
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Unown (WILD)

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The stats are underexaggerated. These batteries can outperform that. I think they just do that so it isn't false labeling/safety issues. Working temp is below 20C. These batteries really are something. I use a battery pack made out of them for spot welding
 

Giannis_TDM

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The stats are underexaggerated. These batteries can outperform that. I think they just do that so it isn't false labeling/safety issues. Working temp is below 20C. These batteries really are something. I use a battery pack made out of them for spot welding
No, I disagree, with anything lithium not to mention batteries adhering to the specified temperatures is beyond a must, hence I remind you those batteries can be summarized as a chemical reaction and as such you can see why they will have a lower current output at x degree c below the spec, 'a better battery' cannot disobey the laws of chemistry, If you want to get technical about it, you will be really stressing out the battery cause at those lowered temps fewer molecules have the energy to cross the minimal energy 'barrier'(energy here as in kinetic energy which at that microscopic level we call heat) (that's the literal term I learned in my chemistry lessons so as a direct translation I may be using the wrong term here) and in turn react in order to produce electricity(way oversimplifying here)

Although you are correct if we deviate from the normal lipo chemistry into more exotic stuff that has been engineered to work in sub 0 environments.

In terms of the original question, @pados1002_Alex_13 my suggestion would be to find heating elements of the appropriate size (the type that are restive wire in a flexible backing with glue) that will not exceed like lets say 5A total to be conservative, 60W of heating, and surround the battery with them, then wire them up with a trustworthy switch, Doing this will not just waste energy and heat up the battery from its internal resistance but will instead devote all energy into heating the battery to operating temps, hope this helps. If you wanna be really professional about it I further recommend to buy a cheap thermometer off ebay ( the kind with a display that just needs power) and wire it up, then you could turn off the heating once the battery case temp has reached say 30c, that would most likely insure that the internal temp will be above freezing.
 

Unown (WILD)

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PS: That's quite the gem you found unown, thats a great price!
I know and why I mentioned them. They have been tested to outperform by a lot of youtubers. I have four of them. I made a 3s 11.1v battery out of them. Dirt cheap in price too and all tested within rated capacity. Had to clean them. Only downside but that was easy. Just dust and what not.
 
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Guys thank you all for the answers... I finally ordered 2 thermal pads from AliExpress... With both of them I 'll wrap the battery perfectly and with some proper wiring I 'll both draw current and heat the battery at the same time! I think that this trick will work!
 




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