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solderless ld connection

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ok thanks gazoo i will practice but its late and im going to bed
 

flogged

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My opinion is a laser diode socket is ABSOLUTELY the way to go, especially if your soldering skills are not up to snuff. Often times the diode manufacturer will list limits on how long and how hot each leg can get when soldering (ususally no more than 5-10 seconds and x temp). So there's a slight chance you can damage the diode while soldering it if things get too hot.

Then again I'm not certain of a source of 5 mm laser diode sockets.

When I made my 635nm pointer (9 mm diode can) I used gold plated sockets which the diode simply plugged into. It's a very secure connection - you don't have to worry about the diode just popping out. THis also makes it easier to replace the diode if it dies.

If you're still actively testing the circuit the one thing to remember is to ALWAYS short out the capacitor before plugging the diode into the circuit.
 

chido

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Flogged, no offense man, but I think you should look at what has happened to a lot of people here because they used sockets instead of soldering directly to the diode and do some research before giving advice. ;)
 

flogged

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chido said:
Flogged, no offense man, but I think you should look at what has happened to a lot of people here because they used sockets instead of soldering directly to the diode and do some research before giving advice. ;)
Research?? LOL. For an LD I think it's stoopid NOT to recommend using a socket, especially for people with little soldering experience.

You simply plug the LD in .. what could be simpler?

As long as any DIYers make certain to short out the cap before attaching the LD things will be fine.

Ony problem is, I don't know a source for 5 mm diode sockets. ;)

I think y'all are making a mountain out of a molehill.
 

chido

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Dude, did you read the thread woolazer posted?
EVERY EXPERIENCED PERSON ON THIS FORUM RECOMMENDS NOT TO EVER USE A SOCKET, NEVER!!!!! :mad:
 

Benm

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And for good reason too.. current sources, buffer capacitors and rattling connections equals bad news!
 

Gazoo

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I look at it this way, and it is quite simple. If anyone can build the required driver, then anyone can solder the leads to the diode. Learning how to solder is very easy and there are plenty of guides on the Internet to walk you through. With a little practice, anyone wanting to take the time to learn can be a pro in no time.

Anyone serious about DIY lasers will need to learn how to solder. It is too easy to rush and look for easy ways out. If you want to learn, read, practice and don't rush.

It's ok flogged disagrees with the majority of us, he is entitled to his opinion.
 
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Well even though no one here likes ld sockets i found a place that sells them

its thorlabs dot com and saerch s8060 for the socket but they dont just sell that they sell allot of other kool stuff

i have a question how does two 10 ohm resitors = 5 ohms when 5 ohms allows more current then 10 ohms is that right or do i have something mixed up?
 

Gazoo

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explsvcookie257 said:
Well even though no one here likes ld sockets i found a place that sells them

its thorlabs dot com and saerch s8060 for the socket but they dont just sell that they sell allot of other kool stuff

i have a question how does two 10 ohm resitors = 5 ohms when 5 ohms allows more current then 10 ohms is that right or do i have something mixed up?
Two 10 ohm resistors in parallel = 5 ohms. Two 10 ohm resistors in series = 20 ohms.
 

chido

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You just place the 2 10ohm resistors in parallel, that way the ohms are cut in half and the wattage is doubled, so if your resistors are 1/2 watt, then when you place them in parallel they should become 1 watt.
Parallel is like this:
 

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roSSco

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chido said:
Dude, did you read the thread woolazer posted?
EVERY EXPERIENCED PERSON ON THIS FORUM RECOMMENDS NOT TO EVER USE A SOCKET, NEVER!!!!! :mad:
+1

 
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ok thank you guys for explaining the ohms thing and evryone seems to be jumping all over this topic i mean its just gotten replies fast
 




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