Welcome to Laser Pointer Forums - discuss green laser pointers, blue laser pointers, and all types of lasers



Laser Pointer Store

Relative Brightness as Explained by Biology

Joined
Mar 16, 2011
Messages
472
Likes
13
Points
0
and I would ues a magnifier to um mimic eye response IE worst case focus
 

Joined
Mar 16, 2011
Messages
472
Likes
13
Points
0
A "bulk bag" of pig eyes for $2! Score!

I'm in, when do we start?
I am not sure, what all do we need, lol a camera, a macro would work best, a wide range of lasers with a known wavelength and power, I have some lasers I would not call mine range wide, only been doing this a year :p I picked an expensive hobby for a limited paycheck, I can buy a bucket of eyeballs though :p
 
Last edited:
Joined
Mar 16, 2011
Messages
472
Likes
13
Points
0
tell you what if we are really doing this, I would like to find out more about it first, and I live in central TX, around Ft Hood, I may try to enlist the aid of other laser enthusiast or I may try to bring this idea to a laser meet, and see if I can get some supplies like lasers and cameras to do a proper test. I would not want to take the time and effort but for data that has no use, if we do it it should be the real deal. I would imagine a laser burn test at a mess of different wavelengths and power on a pigs eye that is very much like a human eye, may garner some support. I am a disabled vet and not to good on funds this year, but I think we should realy know what danger we are taking, and I don't trust news on the internet, for instance, some folks were hurt at a club, had some burns on their eyes, the club owner reported that they were class 3b lasers but in truth on of the lasers was a 6w argon.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Feb 18, 2012
Messages
148
Likes
24
Points
0
I agree; I don't want to put the time and effort into it unless we think we could actually come to some kind of conclusion.

In all reality, I think we would be able to tell very little about the actual dangers of laser energy from exposing a preserved pig eye. If we were to do it right, we would find a fresh source somewhere (slaughterhouse?).

We would also need to do some preliminary tests to see what we are up against before going all out.

Either way, I won't really have time to do any of that for a while... My professional studies and research (as well as other things) come first.

For now, lets think about it without jumping into anything. It's an interesting prospect, but not an easy one, so it will take some careful planning ahead of time.
 
Joined
Feb 18, 2012
Messages
148
Likes
24
Points
0
FYI - the links to a previous thread on 12/10/2011 of a near identical discussion of the biological reasons for color perception and color differentiated perceived brightness:
Biological Reasons for Color Perception


Thx, but I read that whole thread before posting this, and although it contains some of the information, I think it is far from being "nearly identical". That thread started with a question and continued in a piecemeal, convoluted manner.

They were trying to show the mathematical equation of luminous flux and watts at specific wavelengths. The equations that were given show only the fact that "our eyes are more sensitive to green" without actually answering the question "why?".

Although your post did talk about the biological reasons (specific pigments etc.), the biology was lost throughout the rest of the thread.

The same info can be found dispersed throughout other threads as well.


In short; I felt a clear and concise description of the actual biological basis for unequal color sensitivity would be useful.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Feb 18, 2012
Messages
148
Likes
24
Points
0
Thanks. It's a pity that the other O.P. kind of shut you down for giving biological reasoning in a thread named "Biological reasons for color perception", because what he really wanted was mathematical reasons for color perception.
+1 to you for answering his original question!
 
Last edited:




Top