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Recommendations for a laser to melt PLA filament

Rillan

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Dec 17, 2019
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Hi,

I'm a noob here. Part of my job is repairing 3D printers in a school district. One of the issues that comes up is filament disasters where a huge ball of filaments builds around the print head due to an unattended bad print. Using an open flame, heat gun or hair dryer to melt/soften the filament in order to remove it is problematic because there's too much heat over too wide an area.

I was thinking that a laser that was powerful enough to melt pla would be the perfect precision tool to remove the pla.

Can I get suggestions for the best type of laser to accomplish this and where to purchase it? I'm in Canada.

Thanks,
 



steve001

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Hi,

I'm a noob here. Part of my job is repairing 3D printers in a school district. One of the issues that comes up is filament disasters where a huge ball of filaments builds around the print head due to an unattended bad print. Using an open flame, heat gun or hair dryer to melt/soften the filament in order to remove it is problematic because there's too much heat over too wide an area.

I was thinking that a laser that was powerful enough to melt pla would be the perfect precision tool to remove the pla.

Can I get suggestions for the best type of laser to accomplish this and where to purchase it? I'm in Canada.

Thanks,
You're out of luck. If I were you I'd purchase a fine tip soldering iron. https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/health-risks-safety/radiation/everyday-things-emit-radiation/lasers-hand-held-pointers.html
 

CurtisOliver

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Whenever this happens usually, I just heat the extruder up and the plastic will soften enough to remove. Should be no need for extreme methods to get rid of this plastic. Unless they have well and truly clogged the head.
 

Rillan

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The soldering iron is a good idea, however I'd still like to add a laser to our tool kit. Since Canada changed the laws a few years back, laser pointers are still legal but high powered lasers can not be battery operated, they are required to be charged with a wall plug. I'm ok with one that has to be plugged in since it will only be used on a shop desk.
 

steve001

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The soldering iron is a good idea, however I'd still like to add a laser to our tool kit. Since Canada changed the laws a few years back, laser pointers are still legal but high powered lasers can not be battery operated, they are required to be charged with a wall plug. I'm ok with one that has to be plugged in since it will only be used on a shop desk.
I'm not a Canuck so can't offer a further opinion. From the same site. https://www.ccohs.ca/oshanswers/phys_agents/lasers.html
 

paul1598419

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This sounds like a really bad idea. There are so many safe ways to do this. Why add a high powered laser to the mix? It isn't necessary.
 

Cyparagon

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Will a lawn mower give you a haircut? Maybe. Would you be a fool to ignore the warnings of the lawn mower forum community who told you there are better tools for the job? Yes. Yes you would.

A laser is not the appropriate tool for this. If a laser is really the best option you've come up with, you shouldn't be in charge of printer repair.
 




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