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Laser light is literally making us sick!!!

policetac

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*Lasers are sources of non-ionizing radiation (unlike x-ray machines, which produce ionizing radiation capable of knocking electrons out of atoms). Different types of lasers emit "ultraviolet radiation", "visible light", or "infrared radiation" —all are forms of non-ionizing radiation.
University of California, Irvine - Environmental Health and Safety Radiation Safety Div.
https://www.ehs.uci.edu/programs/radiation/LASER SAFETY FACTSHEET.pdf
 

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That doesn't imply ALL lasers emit these types of radiation. Most lasers only operate in one wavelength, so only in either UV, visible or IR light. One of the few exceptions is your average green DPSS laser, which also contains some stray IR light from the pump diode. In medium to high end lasers this is usually filtered out using a simple IR filter. UV lasers are very rare and expensive, so you won't have any UV in your laser beam. Diode laser based projector also contain zero IR radiation, because they don't even use it! If you get a good quality DPSS projector or handheld laser it contains negligible amounts of IR due to the filter. That's just my $0.02

- Double
 
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policetac

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Okay, all that may in fact be true, but does it negate the validity of the advice in any way? If not, and since my statement is essentially correct, why then do you feel the need to criticize my comment?

If you claim it's because "commercially available" lasers typically don't emit UV radiation, then I'd argue that;
1. The context of the statement is essentially correct. That many lasers emit dangerous wavelengths of radiation, and eye protection is recommended.
2. "Commercially available" is a relative term. As all lasers are essentially "commercially available," then I'd argue that just because you cannot afford one doesn't mean that others can't either.
 

Hap

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Okay, all that may in fact be true, but does it negate the validity of the advice in any way? If not, and since my statement is essentially correct, why then do you feel the need to criticize my comment?

If you claim it's because "commercially available" lasers typically don't emit UV radiation, then I'd argue that;
1. The context of the statement is essentially correct. That many lasers emit dangerous wavelengths of radiation, and eye protection is recommended.
2. "Commercially available" is a relative term. As all lasers are essentially "commercially available," then I'd argue that just because you cannot afford one doesn't mean that others can't either.
Very few people have the funds for a UV laser. Only universities or companies can afford DPSS UV or direct diode UV lasers at the price they are at right now without even needing to look at their bank accounts.

-Alex
 

policetac

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Again, does it negate the validity of the advice in any way? If not, and since my statement is essentially correct, why then do you feel the need to criticize my comment?
 
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Because you state that lasers emit UV, which can cause serious injuries in the form of sunburns, and with longer exposures, also skin cancer, which is scary for some people, while it isn't true. There are too many people that think lasers emit tons of invisible radiation which harms your eyes, while for most lasers this is not the case. You are correct in that laser protection should be used, but full spectrum laser glasses are very expensive, and not needed. I'm not criticizing, I'm just giving some clarification :)

- Double
 

policetac

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Who said anything about "full spectrum laser glasses?"
Man, all I told the people to do was use some protection.
Back the f^^k off a^^hole!
 
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Wow calm down bro! If a laser would emit UV, visible and IR radiation, that means it emits accross the full spectrum, and you would need glasses for the whole spectrum to protect yourself
 

Hap

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Who said anything about "full spectrum laser glasses?"
Man, all I told the people to do was use some protection.
Back the f^^k off a^^hole!
What's your deal?

Your comment was so rude I actually needed to log on so I could write a reply(phone browsing)!

-Alex
 




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