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Laser Guide Stars: The most stunning yellow lasers

Encap

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I love this technology.
And although my setup is nowhere near as advanced as that, I still love using my 589nm for star pointing and my 532nm pointer on my telescope.

In my setup below I use my small telescope to guide my big telescope so as to be able to get nice sharp images too.
It's a bit different than projecting your own guide star with a 589nm laser but the idea is that the small telescope is hooked up to a computer which 'watches' a star and it's instantaneous movements through our atmosphere and makes tiny corrections on my big telescope's drive unit hence giving me a sharper, better corrected image.

Here below is the Veil Nebula (west) NGC 6960 taken from my back yard !

Like I said I love this technology.
Awesome Takahashi TOA 130NS setup and mount -- while not inexpensive, it is a very high quality kit and good value for money spent.

Great images---really nice shot of Veil Nebula.

589nm for sure makes a great looking star pointer
 
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H2Oxide

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What's the technology behind these that they can produce 22W of 589.2nm light? I only know of pulsed dye lasers that can approach that.
AFAIK most, if not all 589nm lasers >20W use Raman amplification.
 

RB astro

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Yeah, that was a stupid comment about the camera being mounted on the top. Don't have any excuse other than its early here and my brain is at half mast.
No a 'stupid' question at all Pete.
This particular image of 'The Veil Nebula' required the camera on the big scope.
Other times I have put the camera with a small lens on the top rail, just like you said.

It's all a matter of how much FOV - Field of View is required for any given space object.
I use a program to work out what FOV I need and set up the scope/camera accordingly.
For example, this object below was taken with the DSLR and a 135mm lens riding on the top plate of the scope.
I've posted the details in this thread: http://laserpointerforums.com/f57/no-i-didn-t-use-telescope-91476-2.html
So, yes, I can image both ways, just depends on the object I've chosen.



I thought he just stuck his flip phone in the air and snapped some pics:eek: Hope people know i'm not that stupid.
Not a silly question at all Pman and wondered the same.
My My RB just truly breath taking:beer:
Thank you my friend, glad you liked it.

That's an amazing quality picture. I'd really like to get into astronomy when I get some side money. Being able to see the universe like that from your garden is brilliant. Till then I'll just keep collecting space themes stamps.
It's a great way to relax and enjoy the three hobbies of mine, astronomy, lasers and photography.
Also, sorry, didn't mean to hijack your thread, it's just that I love this stuff.
:beer:
It would be interesting to attach your laser to the telescope and align it so the beam is always centered in the field of view to see how far a distance you can illuminate a surface. I do such a thing it with a spotting scope.
Wish I could do that but being in a bushy area, we don't have clear horizons or any distant surfaces to try it on.

Awesome Takahashi TOS 130NS setup -- while not inexpensive is a very high quality kit and good value for money spent.

Great images---really nice shot of Veil Nebula.

589nm for sure makes a great looking star pointer
Yes indeed, I love my Takahashi gear and I love my 589nm pointer!
You know your stuff !
Cheers buddy.

RB
 
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Awesome pics OP..

And RB as well.. it's amazing to see how many stars are really up there.. all I ever see is a couple stars due to the light pollution off the city.

I'm to afraid to point any of my lasers up as I've said before.. would be my luck a big commercial from CDI would be in the area.
 

Encap

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paul1598419

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I second that, Andrew. Just love the photos you've been able to post here. I may one day get around to buying a scope, but the light pollution here is bad. And, it seems to be overcast much of the time. But, that's just the Pacific northwest. I can see Puget Sound from my patio.
 

Hap

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Must be amazing to see that much 589nm light in person! :)

-Alex
 

RB astro

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Awesome pics OP..

And RB as well.. it's amazing to see how many stars are really up there.. all I ever see is a couple stars due to the light pollution off the city.
Thank you, yes it's amazing how many stars are out there.
It's shocking how much light pollution has destroyed our beautiful night sky.

RBAstro:

Post a few more nice pictures taken through great Takahashi TOA130NS lens. You can't own that equipment and not have taken several more excellent images.

Was looking to see more about that very nice Takahashi EM-400 Temma II Equatorial Mount you have --- a good US dealer has a page on it here---very nice!
This place in California has a lot of great equipment in stock. See: https://www.optcorp.com/takahashi-e...l-mount.html?gclid=CPXwg9TEs88CFcZbhgodUkYByQ
I'll make a new thread soon with more astro photos that I've taken, cheers.
Great link there to OPT Corp, I've bought many things from them before, great to deal with.

I second that, Andrew. Just love the photos you've been able to post here. I may one day get around to buying a scope, but the light pollution here is bad. And, it seems to be overcast much of the time. But, that's just the Pacific northwest. I can see Puget Sound from my patio.
Thanks Paul, yeah I've watch our skies deteriorate badly in the last 10 years that I've been into astrophotography, very sad indeed.
Don't let that stop you though, it's still a great hobby to get into.

Must be amazing to see that much 589nm light in person! :)

-Alex
Alex I'd love to visit these observatories and see the awesome power of these.
My mischievous side though would temp me to shine my 589nm to throw out their guiding though.... :crackup:

RB
 
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My 589 can hit clouds it's divergece is so good. I treated everyone in my astro lab to 589nm goodness. The statdium lights where on at night for no reasons and we could hardly see my professor's green laser. He even asked me where I could get him a brighter laser. He liked 405nm. My 589 cut right through the pollution. Also we had to use a red light and some peoples where just sad they where white red. I used a newwhish 660 with a lens on it.I was the only one who had pure red light.
 




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