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IR protection goggles.

The Purple Death

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I have a pair of goggles which I've tested as being good enough for other wave lengths, but when it comes to IR I have no eye protection and can't see it either.
So I went on ebay to find a cheap pair of goggles. The problem is that these goggles, colored blue, are supposed to protect the IR through UV range. If they aren't black, can't lots of light in the protective range get through?
Does anyone have experience with these type?
 



BowtieGuy

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I have no personal experience with those particular glasses, but they won't protect your eyes from all wavelengths; take a look at some of these "Eagle Pair" safety goggles from Survival Lasers they will protect your eyes from the wavelengths stated on them.
 

paul1598419

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Are you seriously only wanting to pay $1.65 for eye protection from a laser? You really do get what you pay for. And there really aren't glasses available to protect from all wavelengths. When looking for laser goggles you will need to use the optical density of them to gauge whether they will be adequate for your purposes. There will be the letters OD and an integer number that will tell how much they will attenuate the beam if it hits your eye.
 

smallfreak

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You may evaluate the advertising yourself by applying common sense to it. It states that it will block „full range“ between UV and IR. That covers the entire visible spectrum and far beyond that. So what „color“ would you expect from a glass that blocks the entire visible spectrum to a reasonable amount?

Black. You won't see anything with them. Completely pitch black. And completely useless too. You can put a sheet of metal in front of your eyes to get a similar effect.

Since the goggles look blue, they at least have to pass a lot of blue light. That might be OK for red and IR protection, but clashes with the promise, so you can guess what the rest of the promises are worth.

With visible light, you may try and see for yourself if they withstand YOUR laser and whether any light gets through. With invisible IR you either have a trustful LPM or a really trustful vendor. Just hoping the best based on internet advertising of some cheap chinese plastic stuff might be the equivalent of jumping off a cliff into muddy water.

It MIGHT work out, but you probably want to be sure.
 

GSS

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Not the same pair but these were also $5 glasses meant to protect you from red lasers.
They stop nothing..
If you ended up ordering them i'm curious if they stop just red laser?? I also doubt they will block any IR.
 

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The Purple Death

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Are you seriously only wanting to pay $1.65 for eye protection from a laser? You really do get what you pay for. And there really aren't glasses available to protect from all wavelengths.
Actually, until about 2 months ago, IR filters for cameras (which are designed to totally block IR), were 99 cents. I don't think something that blocks IR must cost $60.
Maybe I should make my own glasses using other lenses...

When looking for laser goggles you will need to use the optical density of them to gauge whether they will be adequate for your purposes. There will be the letters OD and an integer number that will tell how much they will attenuate the beam if it hits your eye.
Good to know! Is there a max/min number I can refer to?

You may evaluate the advertising yourself by applying common sense to it. It states that it will block „full range“ between UV and IR. That covers the entire visible spectrum and far beyond that. So what „color“ would you expect from a glass that blocks the entire visible spectrum to a reasonable amount?

Black. You won't see anything with them. Completely pitch black. And completely useless too. You can put a sheet of metal in front of your eyes to get a similar effect.
I said something similar in my initial post.

Since the goggles look blue, they at least have to pass a lot of blue light. That might be OK for red and IR protection, but clashes with the promise, so you can guess what the rest of the promises are worth.
I often find that if a seller is ignorant that does not make the product worse but I do share your concern.

With visible light, you may try and see for yourself if they withstand YOUR laser and whether any light gets through. With invisible IR you either have a trustful LPM or a really trustful vendor. Just hoping the best based on internet advertising of some cheap chinese plastic stuff might be the equivalent of jumping off a cliff into muddy water.
...
Actually, I've been using a night security camera I have hanging around. You know the type, they have IR LEDs and thus they can see my IR diode's beam. I can't get an exact measurement, but a 25%, 50%, 75%, 100% type examination is quite possible and practical.
 

smallfreak

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Actually, I've been using a night security camera I have hanging around. You know the type, they have IR LEDs and thus they can see my IR diode's beam. I can't get an exact measurement, but a 25%, 50%, 75%, 100% type examination is quite possible and practical.
That's a bad type of measurement. Depending on the IR power of your device, the goggles have to attenuate the light to well below 0.1 mW to be called "save". Do if yo have a maximum power of 100mW IR light from your Laser, you need a 1:1000 filter for that wavelength, or in other words at least a "OD3". The "3" corresponds to "1:1000". An OD4 = 1: 10.000, an OD6 = 1: 1.000.000

So if you "guess" it filters 75% of the wavelength the camera is sensitive to, then you still get 25% of the power passing. In this case your Laser should not exceed measured(!) 0.5 mW

And then again, IF the goggles cut the power in the right amount, it has to swallow almost the entire energy of the beam to do so. For beams > 100mW the material must withstand long enough to protect you, before it eventually gets destroyed. For the wavelength in queston the glasses "look" like an ideal black burning target.

No problem for relatively low power, but the guy with the 40W handheld CO2 Laser must get a really sturdy pair of glasses.

I often find that if a seller is ignorant that does not make the product worse but I do share your concern.
I often find that something that is not explicitely grantet is something you should not expect - and even then. The seller has no specific topic on Laser and Laser safety. He sells what he is able to get cheap. I don't see a hint that he even has basic knowledge, what this is all about and probably is only listing "specs" that he got told from whoever sold him this before. Otherwise he would list the attenuation for specific wavelength. How else would you choose the right one? There is no "one size fits all".

These might be great. Or they might be complete crap. You just don't know. Do you bet your eyesight on them just to find out?

But it really depends on YOUR Laser. If you have a moderate green DPSS and want to be save from spilled IR of the pump diode, than almost any "block red" will do. You start with pretty low IR power and 808nm is just a bit off the deep red. If you search protection while adjusting a high power CO2 Laser, you should spend a few bucks for REAL goggles that can reliebly keep out wavelength >10.000nm which is a completely different kind of IR.

Don't judge the price for safety goggles on the price for the Laser. Judge them on the price for a new pair of Eyes.
 







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