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I looked into a geofennel laser

Willysolman

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I looked into this laser, could this have caused damage i looked into it for prob 3 seconds i cant find the watt anywhere tho .https://www.top-bouwlaser.nl/geo-fennel-fl-105h-bouwlaser-set.html
 



paul1598419

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Why would you do such a thing? You should never look into the aperture of any laser while it is activated, regardless if you believe it is not working. If you are concerned that you have done damage you must see an ophthalmologist. There is nothing we can do for you here.
 

Encap

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The spec sheet says it is a Class 2 635nm "red" laser.

You can read about class 2 laser hazard here: https://www.lasersafetyfacts.com/2/
"EYE INJURY HAZARD -- DIRECT AND REFLECTED BEAM
Class 2 visible-light lasers are considered safe for unintentional eye exposure, because a person will normally turn away or blink to avoid the bright light. Do NOT deliberately stare into the beam -- this can cause injury to the retina in the back of the eye.
The Nominal Ocular Hazard Distance (NOHD) for the most powerful Class 2 laser (0.99 mW) with a tight beam (0.5 milliradian divergence) is 46 ft (14 m).
For a 0.99 mW Class 2 laser with a less-tight beam that spreads out faster (1 milliradian), the NOHD is 23 feet (7 m). This divergence is more typical of consumer lasers.
If you are closer than the NOHD distance to the laser, there is a possibility of retinal injury if you stare for a number of seconds into the direct or reflected beam. There would be no retinal injury from a momentary or accidental exposure, if you close your eye, move your head or otherwise avoid the beam staying in your eye. As with any laser exposure, the closer you are to the laser and the longer the beam is in the eye, the greater the chance of injury"



Beyond that if you think you damaged your eye or eyes see a qualified Ophthalmologist MD---nobody on LPF can tell you if you damaged you eye or not--no way of knowing.
See this thread: https://laserpointerforums.com/threads/warning-eye-injury-emergency-procedure.101882/
 

Willysolman

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Why would you do such a thing? You should never look into the aperture of any laser while it is activated, regardless if you believe it is not working. If you are concerned that you have done damage you must see an ophthalmologist. There is nothing we can do for you here.
It was an accident
 

Willysolman

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The spec sheet says it is a Class 2 635nm "red" laser.

You can read about class 2 laser hazard here: https://www.lasersafetyfacts.com/2/
"EYE INJURY HAZARD -- DIRECT AND REFLECTED BEAM
Class 2 visible-light lasers are considered safe for unintentional eye exposure, because a person will normally turn away or blink to avoid the bright light. Do NOT deliberately stare into the beam -- this can cause injury to the retina in the back of the eye.
The Nominal Ocular Hazard Distance (NOHD) for the most powerful Class 2 laser (0.99 mW) with a tight beam (0.5 milliradian divergence) is 46 ft (14 m).
For a 0.99 mW Class 2 laser with a less-tight beam that spreads out faster (1 milliradian), the NOHD is 23 feet (7 m). This divergence is more typical of consumer lasers.
If you are closer than the NOHD distance to the laser, there is a possibility of retinal injury if you stare for a number of seconds into the direct or reflected beam. There would be no retinal injury from a momentary or accidental exposure, if you close your eye, move your head or otherwise avoid the beam staying in your eye. As with any laser exposure, the closer you are to the laser and the longer the beam is in the eye, the greater the chance of injury"



Beyond that if you think you damaged your eye or eyes see a qualified Ophthalmologist MD---nobody on LPF can tell you if you damaged you eye or not--no way of knowing.
See this thread: https://laserpointerforums.com/threads/warning-eye-injury-emergency-procedure.101882/
Thankyou so much, I’am grateful that u helped me 😁 I think there is no damage done well, is it even possible if it was a 3 second not directly staring at it but the beam came from the right. Somebody accidentally picked it up at work and it’s a rotating thing so it shined in my eye for 3 seconds I dont think a 0.99 mw laser could harm the eye for so short period, not staring at it directly, could it?
 

paul1598419

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For three full seconds? An accident is usually a much shorter time frame. Yes, a three second laser strike to your eye from a 0.99 mW laser can do a whole lot of damage.
 

Willysolman

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For three full seconds? An accident is usually a much shorter time frame. Yes, a three second laser strike to your eye from a 0.99 mW laser can do a whole lot of damage.
could be shorter lol, just a time that i just wrote cause i wasn’t sure how long
 

Willysolman

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Is this true?
Got it from another post
If it was an actual 1mw laser, you could stare into it for minutes and not have an issue (not encouraging doing that on purpose though). I have no idea whether the lasers used in those types of devices are actually that low powered though.
 

Encap

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You may be right may be wrong.
The only way to know is for sure is have you eyes examined ASAP, just to be on the 100% safest side especially if there is any even slight change in your vision.
 

paul1598419

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I have a 1 mW 660nm laser that I look at the reflection from a convex mirror which spreads the beam out about 9 cm^2 and that has been very safe, but I would never look into the raw beam for any length of time. I enjoy doing this because the speckle you see in your retina is quite exceptional. But, I would never tell anyone to try this themselves as it would be dangerous because that laser or mirror might not be the same as mine.
 

Willysolman

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I have one last question for future use: Can i look at the laserbeam withouth glasses? And can I look at the top part that rotates where the beam is coming out if I’am standing higher than the laser itself?
 

steve001

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I have one last question for future use: Can i look at the laserbeam withouth glasses? And can I look at the top part that rotates where the beam is coming out if I’am standing higher than the laser itself?
Yes beams are safe folks do that at all laser shows. Where the light exits is called the aperture.
 

Willysolman

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Yes beams are safe folks do that at all laser shows. Where the light exits is called the aperture.
So what do you mean, I can’t look into the aperture right? Or right at the laser beam but I can look at the aperture if I’am standing above it and it is pointed at the wall?
 

steve001

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So what do you mean, I can’t look into the aperture right? Or right at the laser beam but I can look at the aperture if I’am standing above it and it is pointed at the wall?
The part where the beam exits is called the aperture. It's not called "the part where the beam exits. That was all I was saying.
Beams are safe to look at. Here's a photo of laser beams. If you2W-green-animation-disco-laser-light-green.jpg_350x350.jpg were in the room when this photo was taken it would be safe to look at them
 
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paul1598419

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So what do you mean, I can’t look into the aperture right? Or right at the laser beam but I can look at the aperture if I’am standing above it and it is pointed at the wall?
As long as the beam, or its specular reflection, does not strike your eye it is safe to view. Beams are more bright coming toward you than away from, or worse, perpendicular to you.
 




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