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Help: seeking out light and frame for solid projection ( Afrum by James Turrell ).

hasappington

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Hello, I am new here and coming with a question that may not be suited for this forum, but I ask anyways.

I am trying to setup an artwork that mimics this by James Turrell, called Afrum.

Basically, he's projecting the light into the corner, and it creates the effect where the light looks like it's a solid cube.

My question is, and I have not done a ton of experimenting, but - what lights/projecting would you suggest he used for this? And, how did he succeed at projecting such crisp edges. I mean, the light source is nowhere to be seen in the picture, so it's projecting from at least 10-15 feet, and it's very bright and crisp.

Again, to reiterate, what light did he use, and how did he define such a crisp edge on the form?

Please help me out, very curious to hear what you all might think.afrum-turrell.jpg
 



hakzaw1

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I will assume you did a search-- 4 pages on this artist.
here is a quote from one of those hits



  1. James Turrell at the Guggenheim Museum | Observer
    observer.com/2013/08/james-turrell-at-the...
    In Afrum I (White), from 1967, high-intensity projectors beam an illusory cube in the corner. Made of white light, it seems to float like a solid object, but it is entirely insubstantial..''


    Artists are well known for not giving up how they make their art.

    So we may never know-
    but we do know he uses a projector.




    I would really like to see one of his shows. But they may only be pics of his work
 

hasappington

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high-intensity projectors beam an illusory cube in the corner. Made of white light, it seems to float like a solid object, but it is entirely insubstantial..''

we do know he uses a projector.

I would really like to see one of his shows. But they may only be pics of his work
Thank you for your response.

That's just the question though - is the light projected? is it coming from any old projector ??
Other sources say he is using a holographic trick . I know this is referenced artwork is slightly different, but it seems like it could be of the same technique.
what troubles me is that the projection lines are so crisp... so impossibly crisp.

Is he roughly shining light onto a holographic sort of paint on the wall??? Does the surface of the paint affect the reflective quality, possibly enhance the crisp edge, and create the illusory effect of a solid form?

Or do you suppose it's another set of factors? Please let me know what you think.

" James Turrell has innovated photographic techniques that allow light to have a physical presence. Using holography to make the light itself the subject rather than the medium, "

Have you got any ideas?

I also agree, I would love to see his work. There is one of his that I did get to see. I live near San Francisco and went to the De Young to see "Three Gems" Skyspace. It was amazing. Except for the fact that the person I went to see it with couldn't keep from filming the entire god damned event. Totally ruined my zen.
threegems-turrell.jpg
 

Cyparagon

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Since pictures and most video aren't stereoscopic, there's no depth perception and '3D' is easy to cheat. Much like the classic dragon head illusion:



It doesn't work in-person unless you close one eye.
 

paul1598419

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Holography could explain it also. Back in the 1980s I almost bought a hologram of a forest that had binoculars coming out into space. When you placed your eyes at the binoculars you could see a bird's nest full of baby birds. Always regretted not buying it, but they wanted $250 for it at the time.
 




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