Welcome to Laser Pointer Forums - discuss green laser pointers, blue laser pointers, and all types of lasers

LPF Donations

Links below open in new window

ArcticMyst Security by Avery

Help me identify this diode!

Joined
Apr 23, 2011
Messages
177
Points
28
So it's been about 11 years since I've joined and posted. I dusted of my box of bits that started as a lasing project to try and finish, or toss lol
I found this diode in the box with no recollection of where I got it nor it's specs, and the lettering is super tiny, can't fully make it out but hoping someone here might recognize it.
Looking for specs so I can try and test it...
Thanks!

Edit: Here's a backside shot too, maybe someone can give recommendations on how to test w/o knowing specs. also, I've tried searching what the I'm perceiving to be written on the case but not turning anything up. While no idea where I got it, I am fairly certain it was from a vendor I found on here. All three pins are the same length, with the two lower ones looking like they have a small isolator around them going through the case.

Also, just so you know, images are thumbnails, clicking will enlarge and you can see it ;)
 

Attachments

  • Diode2.jpg
    Diode2.jpg
    451.9 KB · Views: 8
  • Diode3.jpg
    Diode3.jpg
    925.4 KB · Views: 6
Last edited:





gazer101

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 23, 2020
Messages
700
Points
63
Most likely a DVD burner laser diode. Start at 2.5V and really low current (~1 mA) to identify the laser color/frequency and polarity (if there is no light at all the polarity is wrong or diode is fried), and adjust voltage accordingly (2.5V usually for red/infrared, 4-6V usually for blue or green).

Invest in a laser power meter and slowly ramp up the current until output power peaks and then go back by 10% or so to establish some safety margins. The resulting voltage and current should be safe to drive the laser
 
Joined
Apr 23, 2011
Messages
177
Points
28
Most likely a DVD burner laser diode. Start at 2.5V and really low current (~1 mA) to identify the laser color/frequency and polarity (if there is no light at all the polarity is wrong or diode is fried), and adjust voltage accordingly (2.5V usually for red/infrared, 4-6V usually for blue or green).

Invest in a laser power meter and slowly ramp up the current until output power peaks and then go back by 10% or so to establish some safety margins. The resulting voltage and current should be safe to drive the laser
Thanks for replying! I was thinking, being a diode it should only pass current one way so a continuity test should determine anode & cathode. Yes?
Any leads on a decent yet moderately (read, cheap) power meter? Aside from testing this diode I'm also trying to finish a laser project which I'm realizing I'll need to get some equipment to accomplish for driver tuning. I'm about to order a 30v/10a benchtop power supply and looking around at test loads, either DIY or this prebuilt one.
Currently unemployed so trying to skate minimally as possible...
Thanks!
 

gazer101

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 23, 2020
Messages
700
Points
63
Thanks for replying! I was thinking, being a diode it should only pass current one way so a continuity test should determine anode & cathode. Yes?
Any leads on a decent yet moderately (read, cheap) power meter? Aside from testing this diode I'm also trying to finish a laser project which I'm realizing I'll need to get some equipment to accomplish for driver tuning. I'm about to order a 30v/10a benchtop power supply and looking around at test loads, either DIY or this prebuilt one.
Currently unemployed so trying to skate minimally as possible...
Thanks!
I would recommend saving up some money and getting this guy: https://www.laserbeelpm.com/laserbee-ax.html

Lasers are an EXPENSIVE hobby, so please quit while you are ahead if you cannot afford to set aside $200/month. I myself have put this hobby on hold in light of the recent recession forming where I live
 




Top