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SenKat

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Do some research, folks - you cannot have a wide spectrum protection against lasers - it wont work. one wavelength or the other will be ommitted, so when you think you are safe, you will not be able to read this post within minutes of exposure. Stick to the single wavelength glasses, you will be happier in the long run, and will be protected MUCH better. It always boils down to your choice, of course - but do some reasearch - you will find that I am correct.
 

bridge

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yes,you are right just for single laser and completely safety your eyes.but for laser show,especially for RGB laser show,to stop the glare light,maybe 450-680nm is better.
:)
SenKat said:
Do some research, folks - you cannot have a wide spectrum protection against lasers - it wont work.  one wavelength or the other will be ommitted, so when you think you are safe, you will not be able to read this post within minutes of exposure.  Stick to the single wavelength glasses, you will be happier in the long run, and will be protected MUCH better.  It always boils down to your choice, of course - but do some reasearch - you will find that I am correct.
 
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Bridge, I'm sorry, but those goggles don't sound like a very good idea.

Can you please let us know the VLT on them? I'm guessing it will be alarmingly low. Even if you get transmittance >50% as soon as you get out of the 450-680nm range (and I'm sure the jump isn't that quick), that would mean you're only passing deeper blue and red wavelengths - neither of which are very visible. With such a low VLT, the dilation of your pupils counteracts the OD the goggles provide.

Overall... it sounds pretty fishy. At the very least I think we need to see a transmission curve and a VLT figure (if you can't post pics/links here, e-mail them to pseudonomen137@gmail.com and I'll post them for you)

As SenKat is saying, you can't block large portions of the visible spectrum at a time. Non-visible light is fine, you can take out all IR and UV with the right coatings. When you take out large chunks of the visible light that goes through though, your eyes try to compensate and end up making you even more susceptible.
 




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