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hello Question laser and scotoma injury

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Can Laser Injury Increase The blind spot?
 



Encap

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Whatever that means.
A symptom-producing, or pathiological, scotomata may be due to a wide range of disease processes, affecting any part of the visual system, including the retina. See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scotoma

Can a laser damage the retina --yes. See: https://laserpointerforums.com/threads/hit-in-eye-with-1000mw-445nm-blue-laser.69469/

Ask a qualified MD ophthalmologist about any particular real world instance.
See: https://laserpointerforums.com/threads/warning-eye-injury-and-what-to-do-in-an-emergency.101881/
Can a grade 3 A laser that hit the eye do permanent damage to the field of view?
 

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RedCowboy and I gave you a real answer -- just ignore the meaningless response above which says you will be fine unless you do something stupid and are not fine, which means nothing. + accidental is accidental, not "stupid"

Beyond that you can read about Class 3R/IIIa laser hazard here: https://www.lasersafetyfacts.com/3R/
Says among other things:
"EYE INJURY HAZARD -- DIRECT AND REFLECTED BEAM
Class 3R visible-light lasers are considered safe for unintentional eye exposure, because a person will normally turn away or blink to avoid the bright light. Do NOT deliberately look into or stare into the beam -- this can cause injury to the retina in the back of the eye.
Be aware of beam reflections off glass and shiny surfaces. Depending on the surface, the reflected beam could be about as strong and as focused as a direct beam.
If you are closer than the NOHD distance to the laser, there is a possibility of retinal damage if the direct or reflected beam enters your eye longer than about ¼ second. The closer you are to the laser and the longer the beam is in the eye, the greater the chance of injury
 
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Liquidator

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RedCowboy and I gave you a real answer -- just ignore the meaningless response above which says you will be fine unless you are not fine which means nothing.

Beyond that you can read about Class 3R/IIIa laser hazard here: https://www.lasersafetyfacts.com/3R/
Says among other things:
"EYE INJURY HAZARD -- DIRECT AND REFLECTED BEAM
Class 3R visible-light lasers are considered safe for unintentional eye exposure,

because a person will normally turn away or blink to avoid the bright light. Do NOT deliberately look into or stare into the beam -- this can cause injury to the retina in the back of the eye.
Be aware of beam reflections off glass and shiny surfaces. Depending on the surface, the reflected beam could be about as strong and as focused as a direct beam.
If you are closer than the NOHD distance to the laser, there is a possibility of retinal damage if the direct or reflected beam enters your eye longer than about ¼ second. The closer you are to the laser and the longer the beam is in the eye, the greater the chance of injury
I think I had a left eye injury.
The blind spot grows and becomes huge.
As I checked the blind spot, I drew a huge circle 10 cm in size and closed one eye on the page that disappeared from the field of view.
When I closed my right eye.
Even when I look in the left eye at the handle of the handle cabinet on the other side just disappears from the field of view.
Caused retinal damage occur?
 

RedCowboy

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>>>Warning<<<


"If you think you need medical help or attention for an eye injury or any other medical problem, you probably do."
"If you have been hit in the eye with a laser and feel you have suffered any type of eye injury as the result of an accident with a laser that may need medical opinion or treatment, go to a hospital Emergency Room and/or consult a qualified Board Certified MD Ophthalmologist ASAP.
LPF is a laser hobbyist website, not physicians, and cannot give any medical or legal advice.
No professional medical or legal advice is available or possible on LPF"

For additional information see laserpointersafety.com here:
Laser Pointer Safety - What to do if you are hit by a laser pointer or laser pen
 

paul1598419

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Your eye has a natural blind spot that everyone has. It is the place where the optic nerve enters the retina. Normally you don't notice it because your brain compensates for it, but it can be seen if you open just one eye and use a moving object to observe this while staring at some point in space. If you are concerned about retinal damage you should see an ophthalmologist. This is the only way to be certain.
 

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Your eye has a natural blind spot that everyone has. It is the place where the optic nerve enters the retina. Normally you don't notice it because your brain compensates for it, but it can be seen if you open just one eye and use a moving object to observe this while staring at some point in space. If you are concerned about retinal damage you should see an ophthalmologist. This is the only way to be certain.
Blind spot should not be a very small and not large spot? Like I described?
 

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Blind spot should not be a very small and not large spot? Like I described?
Do you have a comprehension of the English language problem or are you just trolling the forum with the same thing over and over.?
You have been given the answer to same question several times

Wake up and pay attention>>>Go see a qualified MD Ophthalmologist eye specialist and have him evaluate your eyes/eyesight and give you an expert opinion/answer if you think you have a vision problem of any kind for whatever reasons.

Asking an internet forum where nobody is an eye specialist and nobody can answer your question any better than has already been done several times accomplishes nothing and is idiotic.

Your eye has a natural blind spot that everyone has. It is the place where the optic nerve enters the retina. Normally you don't notice it because your brain compensates for it, but it can be seen if you open just one eye and use a moving object to observe this while staring at some point in space. If you are concerned about retinal damage you should see an ophthalmologist. This is the only way to be certain.
At this point the OP is smelling very "help me troll" like.
 
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GSS

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^^^^^^^^this^^^^^^^^
At first I thought it could be fear of not wanting to go to a doctor to hear the truth like some people do.
But going back to the OP's thread this is the one who constantly posted about his fear of his work laser bar scanner??:whistle:
 

Encap

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^^^^^^^^this^^^^^^^^
At first I thought it could be fear of not wanting to go to a doctor to hear the truth like some people do.
But going back to the OP's thread this is the one who constantly posted about his fear of his work laser bar scanner??:whistle:
Exactly right.
He has been given the answers many times and posts the same or similar questions over and over.
 
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