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paul1598419

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Oh, back in the 1980s I took many hundreds of film photos with my Minolta Camera, lenses and flash attachment. I never had to worry if the picture would come out as I had done my homework on how to adjust my camera for the best results. Sending off a hundred photos and waiting for them to come back was actually half the fun. But, digital cameras for consumers were only a wet dream back then.
 

Benm

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Yeah, those were the days where you had to get it right by experience, not by looking at a viewfinder. I remember taking photographs on film as a kid, though nothing high end, just those little rolls of film you had to manually spin back into their containers and then send off for development. At some point you could even get a cd with digital versions too.

I wouldn't want to go back to that ever though. Digital is so much easier due to the immediate feedback - if i take a picture i can look at the histogram right away to see if i got the exposure right, or zoom in to see if the focus, depth of field, etc was good.

I still prefer a dedicated camera over something like a phone though, full manual control and optical zoom please :D
 

paul1598419

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Well, if film is better for reproducing the color of a laser, I can see the utility of continuing to use it. I never took many photos of lasers back when I was using my Minolta, though. Would be an interesting experiment to try out, however.
 

Benm

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Maybe - photographic film often has 4 color layers in the process, RGB but also Yellow.

This could give better color rendition in the negatives, though i doubt it'll add much to the positives after development.

If the goal is to get a wider gamut than currently available this could be achieved digitally as well. Then again the problem is that we don't have much in terms of technology to display the result: On a monitor you're still limited to it's gamut range, and in print you are limited by what the CMYK system can print... unless you added spot colors which would probably make amazing laser pictures :)
 




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