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Best LPM Coatings

justinjja

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What are they?

MarioMaster recommended just flat black paint in his DIY $50 LPM thread, what kind of damage threshold would that have, and how linear would it be across the visible spectrum?
(is that what is used on the Radiant Alpha?)

I have heard people say BBQ/stove paint may work, any thoughts on that?
I assume it would have the damage threshold, but what about the being linear for different wavelengths?

What about professional coatings? Do companies like Ophir and Scientech make their coatings in-house or buy them from someone?

---

I have tried a sample of Avian Black-S coating, but found it couldn't cope w/ high powered lasers

I also tried some Cinefoil which seems to have a decent damage threshold, but it has an unknown accuracy across different wavelengths.
 
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offroadfreak8582

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i believe just any non glossy heat resistant thin spray paint will do for a DIY lpm it just needs calibration after a coating.

I have no clue what jerry uses for his laserbee's but im am sure he will cut in this thread!

I remember that this is allready asked once, if i am correct that is :tinfoil:

greetings,,
 

justinjja

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With somthing like regualr flat black paint, I worry that A 1W blue may meter in at 1W,
but a 1W green or red might not meter as 1W.
Thats what I mean when I say linear

I did search, but didn't find a good answer, got a link?
 
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BShanahan14rulz

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I think part of making a hobbyist grade DIY LPM is that you need to calibrate it yourself, i.e. you will probably need a known output source of each 405nm, 445nm, 532nm, 635nm, and 660nm. Worst case, you can get away with one and assume equal coeff. across the range of wavelengths, or two and assume linearity between the two sample points.
 

justinjja

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I think part of making a hobbyist grade DIY LPM is that you need to calibrate it yourself, i.e. you will probably need a known output source of each 405nm, 445nm, 532nm, 635nm, and 660nm. Worst case, you can get away with one and assume equal coeff. across the range of wavelengths, or two and assume linearity between the two sample points.
I'm looking to make a more professional grade lpm :D lol

seriously though I want to find a coating that will won't require conversions for different wavelengths.
 




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