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Anti-reflected absorbed red laser

sfcdrlCat

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I need a way to absorb red laser thru glass or disperse it like anti UV picture frame glass. Can it be done cheaply?
 



Unown (WILD)

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The most common way is to head over to a home depot and purchase something called a plunger. This high tech device has suction power. Once purchased head home. Next proceed to place the wide end of the rubber high tech suction device on your entire face. Then proceed to pull back and forth in a rhythmic motion until you feel like you're about to pass out.
Once that is completed you will have a protective energy field that will absorb all red laser light for approx. 10 mins. Hope this helps.
 

sfcdrlCat

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The most common way is to head over to a home depot and purchase something called a plunger. This high tech device has suction power. Once purchased head home. Next proceed to place the wide end of the rubber high tech suction device on your entire face. Then proceed to pull back and forth in a rhythmic motion until you feel like you're about to pass out.
Once that is completed you will have a protective energy field that will absorb all red laser light for approx. 10 mins. Hope this helps.
I appreciate that informed response, you'reobviously an expert in lasers. However; I actually need to use a beam splitter, polarizer or coating to prevent laser from reflecting back to the emmiter.
 

RA_pierce

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I'm having trouble understanding exactly what you are trying to accomplish.
If, as you state in the second post, you are trying to prevent reflections back to the emitter, the obvious way is to use optics with anti-reflective coatings for the wavelength(s) you are using. This reduces the reflections but does not eliminate them. You can check the coating specifications for the % transmission and reflectance to determine which coatings suit your needs. Ideally, you'll want reflectance to be reduced below the damage threshold of your laser cavity or to a level that will not otherwise affect the performance of the cavity.
The only way I know of to prevent back reflections completely is to position planar surfaces of your optics at a slight angle so that a reflected beam will be slightly offset and will not re-enter the cavity.

I often use Edmund Optics Knowledge Center for simple optics problems like this. They may have an article or video dedicated to back reflections. See the link below:
 
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Cyparagon

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Why, OP? We can help you a lot better if you actually tell us what you're trying to do rather than toss out vague specifications.
 

sfcdrlCat

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Thankx RA, the reason is to be able to use a laser pointer on a glass HUD simulator to direct the pilots' eyes to where an instructor wants his focus. A monocular IR lense picks up the reflection more because it's magnified and within the refractive index of the HUD glass. Some coatings eliminate most red and UV waves, as you said. It can be done with inexpensive coatings on polycarbonate eyeglass lenses and cyan filters. It's a bit more expensive to coat an entire aircraft windshield sized HUD. Again, thankx for your response. I'll check out the info you provided a link to.
Why, OP? We can help you a lot better if you actually tell us what you're trying to do rather than toss out vague specifications.
The application is proprietary and we don't want visitors. This is a world wide public forum, right? An NIR 1 coat of VIS 0° will get me there along with a beam splitter, (that came to mind when a plunger at the hardware store suggestion was given). I would be happy to go into greater depth of our and other possible applications in private. Thankx for your interest.
 

Wakrah

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Call EdmundOptics, they have optical engineers who can help with some questions. I believe most of them are fairly new to the field, perhaps right out of college, but they offer free optical advice for their products.
 




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