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New here - 488 60mw SanWu Pocket Laser and safety?

sikotic

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Dec 28, 2018
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Hey guys, I'm new here and just treated myself to a new 488 60mw SanWu Pocket Laser which has finally arrived.

I'm pretty ignorant as to the power of lasers, even with some of the research I've tried to do so please bear with me. I just want to be as cautious as I can with this and get some opinions from you guys, as I know this is not a toy.

How powerful exactly Is this 60mw 488 Pocket Laser?
Does this have burning capabilities? Pop a balloon? Light a match?

How careful do I need to be when it comes to protective eye-wear etc...? So far I've only pointed it at non-reflective dark surfaces. If I shine it on a white wall, the dot is fairly bright.

Lastly, I'm noticing some leak coming from the laser which is spreading out depending how far I am from a wall, do I need to be worried about that? Is that leak dangerous if someone sees it?

I was told by SanWu that goggles weren't really necessary for this laser, but I want to be extra careful.



I'll post photos here soon

Thanks in advance and sorry if this is was not posted in the correct place.
 

paul1598419

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Joined
Sep 20, 2013
Messages
14,785
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First of all, a 60 mW laser is not good for burning things. It is plenty powerful enough to blind you if the beam hits your eye or a reflected collimated beam hits your eyes. Looking at the spot on a wall is not going to cause you any injury, but accidents happen and until you are more familiar with lasers you should wear them to protect your eyes from accidental reflections or the beam crossing over your eyes while you are waving it around.

The light you see coming out of the sides is just splash and is coming from around the lens, so it won't be collimated and won't cause harm to your eyes. The diode used to get 488nm is the Sharp diode that is actually closer to 490nm and only about 15% of those are low enough to actually be 488nm. If your laser looks cyan instead of light blue, it is most likely 490nm or higher in wavelength.
 

sikotic

New member
Joined
Dec 28, 2018
Messages
2
Points
1
First of all, a 60 mW laser is not good for burning things. It is plenty powerful enough to blind you if the beam hits your eye or a reflected collimated beam hits your eyes. Looking at the spot on a wall is not going to cause you any injury, but accidents happen and until you are more familiar with lasers you should wear them to protect your eyes from accidental reflections or the beam crossing over your eyes while you are waving it around.

The light you see coming out of the sides is just splash and is coming from around the lens, so it won't be collimated and won't cause harm to your eyes. The diode used to get 488nm is the Sharp diode that is actually closer to 490nm and only about 15% of those are low enough to actually be 488nm. If your laser looks cyan instead of light blue, it is most likely 490nm or higher in wavelength.
Hey I just want to say thanks for taking the time to respond. I definitely didn't get this laser for burning purposes, but I was just trying to get a sense for how powerful the 60mw really is.

It sounds like direct exposure and concentrated reflections are my biggest concerns right? But looking at the beam from the side or looking at the dot on a wall shouldn't cause damage?

Thanks again
 

paul1598419

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 20, 2013
Messages
14,785
Points
113
Hey I just want to say thanks for taking the time to respond. I definitely didn't get this laser for burning purposes, but I was just trying to get a sense for how powerful the 60mw really is.

It sounds like direct exposure and concentrated reflections are my biggest concerns right? But looking at the beam from the side or looking at the dot on a wall shouldn't cause damage?

Thanks again
Yes, that is correct. But, accidents by definition, are always possible and you can never tell when a laser that is on becomes out of your control and you get a direct hit or a collimated reflected hit to an eye. Power is power regardless of wavelength. So any 1 watt laser is as dangerous as any other 1 watt laser no matter how visible it seems to you.
 




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