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Best Battery Type For A Green Laser

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ok
been researching
and havent decided which battery could be the best for a GREEN (or any) laser.

maybe a NiMH....or a lithium?

energizer e^2 titanium?
duracell ultra?
rechargeable or disposable?

maybe you could help...
and discuss this, i think it'd be of great help to every user
 

SteelRain

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Many people here will tell you that e2 Lithiums are great and whatever. Ill say otherwise.


Ive used a lot of batteries when lasering, and the best so far are my ebay batteries. Cheap. Easy to use, and most of all, effective.

I use rechargeable Ni-Mh batteries rated at 1800 mAh in my lasers of various powers......... they work perfect in anywhere from my 5mw CORE to my higher rated models......


Dont get me wrong, lithiums are great batteries, but they arent the BEST. Especially when it comes to cost. Lithiums are NOT wallet friendly.

I went to Home Depot today and saw 10 e2 lithiums on SALE for 12 bucks. It isnt THAT bad but when you compare it to 8 1800 mAh NiMh it isnt comparable.

First off, my Ni-Mh batteries can be recharged up to 1000 times and still be good. To put that into perspective........If you recharged ALL of them once a day they would last about 3 years. Also, Ni-Mh batteries have NO memory effct-meaning when you recharge them they always go back to full power. Now for the great part.

The e2 lithiums give out a generous 950 or so mAh (Thats milli amps per hour, i believe) The more, the better. M y Ni-Mh's are rated at 1800 mAh. Thats DOUBLE th length of time mine will last than the e2's.

so, to summarize: 1800 mAh batteries get DOUBLE the amount of usage per recharge than e's get in their ENTIRE battery lifetime. That 1800 mAh can be used for 1000 times. You can get 8 of them for 12 bucks INCLUDING shipping.

http://cgi.ebay.com/8-x-AAA-Recharg...ryZ64346QQssPageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem
 
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The only bad thing about regular recharable batteries is that they lose there charge every single day, every day 1% of their charge is lost, so in one month they will only have 75% capacity.

also most of the time they have quite a bit less mah than they advertise

...lazer... ;D ;D ;D
 

SteelRain

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wooooooolazer said:
The only bad thing about regular recharable batteries is that they lose there charge every single day, every day 1% of their charge is lost, so in one month they will only have 75% capacity.

also most of the time they have quite a bit less mah than they advertise

...lazer... ;D ;D ;D

They still have capacity they just dont hold the charge they once had. In other words if you recharge the batteries to 100% and leave them out unattended for a month they very well will be at 75%. My question would be, why? Stick them back in the charger for an hour and your good to go.

Ive had my batteries for over a year now and have not seen a significant drop.....Ive used them in everything from lasers to mp3 players to appliances....... they work awesomely and are a better deal than alk.s

I hate to see people go out and buy disposable batteries-there is absolutely no point at all to it as far as i can see. Big companies like Duracell and Energizer rake in the money from people who just go to over priced retail sores to get batteries..... all you have to do is get a few pair of rechargeables and your good for at least a year....
 

Gazoo

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I would bet the true capacity of your 1800ma batteries is 1000ma at most. There are no 1800ma hour AAA batteries. I know you also posted this in the Deals and Discounts section of this forum, and I also replied there.
 

SteelRain

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Gazoo said:
I would bet the true capacity of your 1800ma batteries is 1000ma at most. There are no 1800ma hour AAA batteries. I know you also posted this in the Deals and Discounts section of this forum, and I also replied there.

I have a set of 1000 mAhs and my 1800's will outlast them anyday. In fact, when i use them in my CORE (At 300 mAh) you can use them for moe than 3. hours of use.


Unless my 950's are producing extremely low energy levels... which i doubt they are as they are new and brand name than the battery is definitely over 1000 mAh. Whether its 1800 on the nose i wouldnt put my life on, but >1000 mAh is very likely.
 

sc_bond

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Rechargeables are a lot cheaper and last longer, lithiums give better peformance but are only single use. Whether you want to save money or go for the best performance it's your choice. If I were you I'd get a pair of lithium batteries and then after that just use rechargeables.
 
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Thats why the need to come out with rechargable lithium ones that give out the same voltage as an energizer e2 lithium.

Solve all the problems

...lazer... ;D ;D ;D
 
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thank all of u for the answers

yeah, mAh is mili amps per hour

well

i cant really spend too much money on batteries since i am from argentina and everything is more expensive here...

for instance, 1 dollar = 3 pesos...

so thank u for the eBay link but i wont be able to buy them
even though its an 8-pack for 5 dollars + 7.5 dollars on shipping costs..itd be 12,5 dollars

and
12,5 dollars = 37,5 pesos

imagine having to pay 37,5 dollars for ur rechargeable batteries..

and that is without adding the charger...so there goes like 30 more dollars...
and 30 dls = 90 pesos :p

a total of 127,5 dollars for batts and a charger..

i REALLY appreciate your help but ill just have to buy some rechargeables here



one more thing

ive NEVER seen 1800mAh AAA's.. the max value i have seen is 1250mAh....are u sure those are properly rated?

thx ;D
 

iLikeLight

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NiMH is available in Slow-Drain (Eneloop, Rayovac Hybrid, Kodak makes some too, and so does Duracell) and advertises better shelf-life per charge than regular NiMH. The only trade-off is that regular NiMH is on average higher mAh than Slow-Drain NiMH (e.g. 2700 vs. 2100).

Amazon will standard ship to Argentina for $7.99 + $1.99/pound for electronics (http://www.amazon.com/gp/help/customer/display.html?nodeId=596202&#StandardInternationalShipping). I suggest buying the NiMH charger in Argentina becuase any NiMH charger will charge Slow-Drain NiMH's. Or you can buy the rayovac charger plus eight batteries for 16.75. If you choose the later, it is a two-pound shipment and will bring your order to USD $28.72. You might find use for the AA's if you could use them in a portable CD player or booklight or something else that eats up batteries.

Sanyo Eneloop 4 AAA = $8.84
Rayovac Hybrid 4 AAA = 9.75
Rayovac Hybrid Charger + 4 AA + 4 AAA = $16.75 *Probably the best value* http://www.amazon.com/Rayovac-Hybri...2?ie=UTF8&s=electronics&qid=1199301708&sr=8-2

Kodak - couldn't find slow-drain on amazon
Duracell Precharged - couldn't find slow-drain on amazon

I have used the Rayovac Hybrid batteries (from Wal-Mart) with success in my red pointer and my Fenix flashlight. Rayovac claims that after one year of sitting on the shelf, my batteries will still have about 80% power.

Before I had those, I used Energizer NiMH and those were terrible because they had virtually no power after about two months of just sitting on the shelf.
 

rhildinger

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Just a quick correction...

mAh is not milliamps per hour, it is a combined unit called a "milliamp hour"

Current, which in this case is measured in milliamps, is not a discrete quantity, but rather a measure of the "rate" of delivery. To convert a rate to a discrete quantity we multiply it by a unit of time, hence the combined unit "milliamp hour". This is analogous to the way companies measure and divide man power amongst individual projects by using "man hours", which is the amount of work 1 man can do in 1 hour.

In terms of battery storage capacity, a "milliamp hour" is the amount of current a battery can deliver over one hour at the rated voltage. For example, a 2000 mAh battery can deliver current at the following rates:

- 500 mA for 4 hours
- 1000 mA for 2 hours
- 2000 mA for 1 hour
- 4000 mA for .5 hour


-Robert
 
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For performance E^2 lithiums are the best, period. For cost efficiency, its a whole diff story.

SteelRain, I'm sorry but you DO NOT have 1800mAh 1.2V AAA cells. If your "1800mAh" are outlasting your "1000mAh" then you probably have something like 1000mAh and 750mAh batteries. The big players in the industry, the name brands with the most money and the most research in the field are now just pushing 1000mAh. So when some off-the-wall Chinese company pops out of nowhere and sticks a 1800mAh label on their $1 apiece battery, its impossible for me to not laugh.

Personally, I just buy energizer alkalines in bulk. I have NiMH AAAs, hundreds of dollars worth, but you charge them and then they slowly drain on the shelf. Sanyo eneloops apparently have nearly fixed this problem, so they are another good option, but I haven't gotten around to trying them out yet.

In high drain devices though, no question, the E^2 liths are monsters offering far longer life than alkalines, and longer life than NiMH. At $5+ for 2 to stick in my laser though, I keep them only for special occasions  ;)


PS: And yeah, please check out Gazoo's first response. The topic of what battery to use gets beaten to death multiple times a year on multiple forums.
 

RobTheVIP

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Easily energizer lithiums. I bought 5 unopened packs of 4 on ebay for $28. Ebay has amazing deals for lithiums, just search hard. I've used 4 of these batteries in the last 3 months. I don't use my laser everyday, but either way these last quite a while.
 

Gazoo

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I found the graphs and testing done on Eneloops by Silverfox over at Candle Power Forums. The testing was started in January 2007, and recently updated. Look at the graphs closely and compare.

http://www.candlepowerforums.com/vb/showthread.php?t=149804

Silverfox has also been testing regular Nimh batteries. This thread was started in March of 2005 and was recently updated:

http://www.candlepowerforums.com/vb/showthread.php?t=79302

The data shown should help everyone decide what to buy for Nimh batteries. As a side note, I do have a set of Sanyo 2700 Nimh batteries I am not using, but I wanted to test them, and my tests concur with his. His equipment and testing methods are much better than mine. I am using a Maha MH-C9000 for testing. It is an awesome charger.

http://thomasdistributing.com/maha-mh-c9000-battery-charger.php
 




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