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What type of laser is this?

Forgotten

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I found this device that I'm assuming is a laser because of the warning stickers but I don't want to hook it up to a car battery and overload it, or cause damage if the laser can cut things. If anyone can help me identify this, or test it safely I would appreciate it.

Thank you.
 

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jeffreythe00

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Judging by the shape, the warning sticker and relative size it looks like a HeNe (Helium Neon laser) for some sort of alignment

If this is the case. 12v would certainly not break nor power it. HeNe's run on HV.

Though I've not ever seen a HeNe that had a case like that.. so I could be wrong.
 

pschlosser

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I cannot quite read the wavelength on the warning sticker in your picture. Can you tell us what it says? I see it's class 3R, which suggests it tops out at 5mW of power. My guess it's a HeNe, as well. Helium Neon. But the high voltage it takes to run one (mine runs at 2160v DC) does not correlate with those clamps. I've been shocked enough times, handling my tube(s) that I wouldn't want to be the one clamping and unclamping those if the power were on.

Maybe it's a pulsed dye laser: AlGaInP quantum well (QW) lasers (620-690 nm) as in red laser diode. That could be a real find. Widely used in laser distance measuring equipment.

My google search: 620-690 nm laser - Google Search

Do you want to sell it? :D

Edit: My copy of the Handbook of Laser Wavelengths suggests there is an organic dye laser that is pumped by an Argon laser (458 - 514 nm) that puts out 620-690 nm wavelengths. This may indicate the real gem was the Argon Ion laser that feeds into it. Shine a white light through it and let us know what color comes out the other end. It contains a solution made of Ethylene Glycol (automotive coolant) and Rhodamine 640 Perchlorate.
 
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Forgotten

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The sticker says the following:

"Avoid Exposure - Laser radiation is emitted from this aperture"
"Laser Radiation - Avoid Direct Eye Exposure - Class 3R Laser Product"
"620-690nm / 4.75mW max Class IIIa Laser Product"

This device complies with part 15 of the fcc rules. Operation is subject to the following two conditions: (1) This device may not cause harmful interference and (2) This device must accept any interference received including interference that my cause undesired operation.

It is 26" long and the plug is labeled 15A. 125V.

I'm not sure what you mean about shining a light through it. The plug end is solid so I couldn't shine a light all the way through.

However, I can shine a light into the glass end and see a circuit board and something labeled:

"Made in Germany"
1524T012S
L 1307
 
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pschlosser

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Hmm, it seems improbable there is an Argon Ion laser in there, feeding a dye-filled chamber.

But you are right, I presumed it was open on both ends, even though I think only one end can be seen from the photos.

Searching for the "620-690" may be key in identifying the type if laser it is.
 

Forgotten

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I buy storage lockers, like on storage wars. This one was in a unit owned by a plumber, who also had a fascination with rocks. There are some rocks that are cut through and partially cut through. My thoughts are that this laser was used either for plumbing, or for cutting rocks, but I'm pretty clueless as I don't really know anything about lasers, other than that my cat loves to chase them.
 

pschlosser

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Welcome to the forum.

We may not see you until you find another laser, but welcome anyway. :)
 

Forgotten

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I googled 620-690 nm but still have no clue what this could be used for. Do you think it could cut rocks? What could I clamp this to to supply the right amount of power? I'm anxious to fire it up.
 

Cyparagon

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All that means is "red," it doesn't define a type. My guess: 90% chance of HeNe; 9% chance of diode, 1% chance of "other."
 

DrSid

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I googled 620-690 nm but still have no clue what this could be used for. Do you think it could cut rocks? What could I clamp this to to supply the right amount of power? I'm anxious to fire it up.

Don't be anxious, nothing good can come out of it. At 5mW, it won't cut anything. It would be basically eye-safe.
I say it's 99% He-Ne.
 

Forgotten

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Do you suppose it has a purpose other than just being a giant laser pointer? At 15A 125V I'm assuming that it would be powered by a normal wall outlet. The attachment that it is using right now looks like it is for a battery. Maybe I can find the wall outlet attachment somewhere in the boxes.
 

jeffreythe00

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Well, if you want to power it up you could just cut the end off any AC appliance cord and use the black and white wires. You would basically strip the ends of the wires and clip the laser to the white and black wires. 15A is the max for an average household outlet so you wouldn't have to worry about tripping the breaker or blowing the outlet.

This is assuming that your outlets are not 220 :)
 
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Flaminpyro

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That plug could have come off of anything and not be an original part of this laser so I would not be hooking it up to 120 vac !

I would start with a 12 volt battery as that is what it looks like it has been connected to in the past, otherwise why would there be LARGE battery style clamps on it.

If you hook it to 12 vdc there is a good chance nothing will happen if it's not meant to run on 12 vdc :thinking:

The other reason I suggest 12 vdc is because I know of no HENE's that have a circuit board like that so there could be a invert er inside the casing that converts 12 vdc
to the operating voltage of the tube which is most likely over 2000 volts.
 
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pschlosser

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The User Manual for the Leica 6700 Series Pipe Laser shows an image (on page 39) of the label on the laser that very closely matches the labels shown in your picture. Page 21 of the PDF states the whole unit is powered by a 12 VDC source, and even suggests connection to a car or truck battery. That certainly correlates with those clamps on your cable.

I found the PDF User Manual on the product information page found here:

Laser Alignment 6770 Pipe Laser - Red Beam Pipe Laser W/Alignmaster (Free Accessory Kit) - Pipe Lasers

The specs on the webpage suggests a 635 nm Laser Diode.
 




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