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What happened to the x-105?

ninja_tux

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Dec 31, 2007
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Hi, I currently have a wimpy little 5 mW green laser, and I was interested in spending around $200 in the near future on a laser, and from what I've read on these forums, as well as others, nova lasers seems to be the way to go. I also have noticed that people seem to be very happy with the "x-105" from novalasers, and this confuses me as I do no see it on their site. I see the "x-100" and then the "x-125", but no x-105. My question is what happened to the x-105? Did they simply rename it? Does it have a smaller output? I also am confused about the ability of different power outputs of lasers, according to nova, the x-100 can't light a match, but the nova 105 can, so this would lead me to believe that they did indeed trash the 105 and now they only sell the 100. Two last things, would 5 mWs really make that much of a difference, and what is a "collimator optic accessory?
Any insight you could offer would be greatly appreciated.
 

scopeguy20

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Jun 28, 2007
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Nova lasers are great no doubt they and LaserGlow are the best companies for those who, like me don't have more than $200 to spend on laser toys! Nova has changed the list of the laser power levels they offer. They did, in the recent past, tend to sell us about 5 to 12 % more mW than the laser was rated. So I had no trouble lighting up things (short of cigarettes and paper) with my Nova Laser X-85 that had about 100 mW output. A collimator is a lens that makes the dot smaller and therefore more power per area. Some lasers already focus the dot small enough, and some that would not burn things will if the dot is small enough. I have seen smoke rise from my ~10 mW bluray when the dot is nearly microscopic! All this means, you can burn and save by getting the dot really small. I have also bought a LaserGlow <5 mw Galileo, and turned up the potentiometer (easy to learn and do) and with lens I had a burner that cost under $90! Look for my Galileo Group Buy and get one of these, the beam in the dark is the best I have seen in a well built, well IR filtered, long battery life, constant "on" switch unit, and no lens needed for that night time green stick to the stars look!
 




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