Welcome to Laser Pointer Forums - discuss green laser pointers, blue laser pointers, and all types of lasers



Water Cooling a 445?

cod4pwns08

New member
Joined
Jul 9, 2009
Messages
51
Points
0
Hey so this may be (and probably is) a crazy idea, but has anyone tried water cooling a housed and heat(sunk) 445 or any laser diode.

So you have the diode, then the aixiz housing (or whatever) then the heatsink, and then hollow copper tubing spun around the heatsink ran by a battery powered pump?

Anyways, just a crazy idea, feel free to shoot it down.
 



shawnk1994

New member
Joined
Jul 6, 2010
Messages
102
Points
0
Seems like a really bad idea electricity and water just don't mix lol, but a good cooling concept.
 

DJNY

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 2, 2009
Messages
5,992
Points
83
:gun:

You should make it like Wickedlasers, test your laser in the Arctic and write down 100% duty cycle. They didn´t lie about the "Continious" duty cycle but I don´t expect this here at the mid-latitudes ;)



Correct me if I´m wrong, but isn´t a computer an electric appliance? :undecided:
Seems like a really bad idea electricity and water just don't mix lol, but a good cooling concept.

:)
 
Last edited:

Cheech

Active member
Joined
Mar 29, 2010
Messages
391
Points
28
For a portable a tec would probably be better but for a lab I think it would be a good notable alternative.
 

Cyparagon

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 12, 2007
Messages
9,785
Points
113
The power isn't high enough, nor is the required operating temp low enough to require water cooling. Sure you can do it, but it's not practical.
 

oic0

New member
Joined
Jun 15, 2010
Messages
289
Points
0
Yeah it would be overkill for anything but a labby with multiple diodes. The purpose of water cooling is usually to move the heat elsewhere to a large radiator. It would be hard to fit the pump inside a portable and then there would be nowhere for a radiator large enough to even get rid of the heat added to the system by the pump.
I do think it would be outright awesome to see a host with heatpipes in it though. Heatpipes are the tubes that go in high end CPU coolers, they have a wax or liquid in them with a very low melting temperature and the heat causes it to circulate spreading the heat to the cooling fins.
 
Last edited:

CrazyMonkey

New member
Joined
Jun 13, 2010
Messages
102
Points
0
I agree with Cyparagon.
Unless you have an array or 24 of them, whats the point.
Oic0's idea is more practical.
Pelter coolers are a good idea if you want them at room temp,
or even below.
 

DJNY

Well-known member
Joined
Nov 2, 2009
Messages
5,992
Points
83
Has anyone worked with IgorT´s "v3 heatsink-modules" yet?
 

Razako

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 17, 2006
Messages
4,493
Points
113
How about submersing the module and driver in chilled mineral oil? You know the stuff used to insulate and cool high voltage transformers.
 

CrazyMonkey

New member
Joined
Jun 13, 2010
Messages
102
Points
0
Hmm.. You do know they only put out a few watts of heat max right?
It might work, if it does not absorb 445. What if it gets into the can?
You will loose power for sure, if for no other reason then reflection of the glass holding the oil in.

Post pics if you do it :yh:
 

jbtm

New member
Joined
Mar 22, 2010
Messages
495
Points
0
Some people use oil to cool...I've personally stuck a whole computer while it was running into a tub of vegetable oil as super-cooling.

Oil can easily work, like mineral oil, this way any leaks will result in no damage. Keep in mind they sometimes use mineral oil (other times transformer oil) in high voltage transformers to insulate the coil windings...It's very commonly used for high voltage insulation, and cooling.
 

Gryphon

New member
Joined
May 4, 2009
Messages
1,838
Points
0
I like the oil idea, i saw a couple computers submerged in the stuff and its actually pretty neat
 

mikeeey

New member
Joined
Jun 7, 2007
Messages
1,771
Points
0
How about submersing the module and driver in chilled mineral oil? You know the stuff used to insulate and cool high voltage transformers.
yeah that's what I was going to say, I remembered someone had posted this a while back:

 

itw3ak

New member
Joined
Jul 7, 2009
Messages
41
Points
0
I would say a simple heatsink and perhaps a small fan would suffice a single diode. I mean in my experience you don't need water cooling for any electronic device unless its heat output is over say 100watts or more. Just as an example a average quad core desktop processor in a modern PC expels well over 100watts of heat. I can't recall the users name but I saw a really inventive CPU heatsink that was drilled out to hold a Aixiz module. Ive personally used water cooling in many forms in my desktop PC builds for years now and its bulky at best, carries a risk of leakage, evaporation of the cooling liquid is an inevitability over time and pumps wear out. Seriously though modifying a CPU heatsink or even one of the heat-pipe types could be an interesting experiment :) Above all I would make absolutely sure the actual diode itself is making very good contact with its heatsink or all of this is in vain.
 




Top