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Voltage/Amperage Controlled Driver? (Advanced)

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I know There are drivers that exist that can control amperage/voltage temperature which basically works to give you an unlimited duty cycle due to the heat the driver/diode gives off.

That would require electronic skill and would be a customized driver build.

Looking for one of these for a 1W 520nm diode @1.8Amps (that could vary between 500ma-1.8A) to give the diode a long run.

I'm thinking of SXD w/ramp up would do a pretty good job.
 
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Cyparagon

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I know There are drivers that exist that can control amperage/voltage temperature
I'm proficient with drivers, but that made zero sense to me. Can you give an example of a product with the feature you're trying to describe?
 
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Here's the thread. He's basically saying his lasers have 100% duty cycle and the driver has overheating protection in it.
http://laserpointerforums.com/f39/f...ld-lasers-10-off-sales-free-g-lens-93166.html

"All series are designed with basic water proof ability, made with nickel-copper alloy for the lowest thermal resistance to absorb and transfer the enormous heat from the copper heatsink to the whole body so to achieve unlimited duty cycle(except 405nm) with long life expectancy to the diode. Protective drivers are bulit in to ensure the laser will never overheat itself."
 
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Cyparagon

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So you're looking for a driver that doesn't overheat after a few minutes?
 

Benm

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From an electronics standpoint such drivers are not that difficult to make. What you would basically do for a laser diode is build a constant current driver, that is limited by a thermal sensor. It will provide a set maximum current as long as the diode is cold, but start to decrease that current when it gets warmer.

Building it into an actual product is not that easy: you need the thermal sensor coupled with the laser diode, and also space for the circuitry. The additional circuitry isn't that complex (an opamp and a few resistors) but if you need to build it by hand on breadboard it will probably be much larger compared to a factory built, surface mount, driver on a proper circuit board.
 




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