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Viewing lasers by video

Metryq

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I believe lasers should be treated like firearms—know the target and what is beyond it, don't point it anything you don't want destroyed, no screwing around with safety protocols ("I'll be okay without safety glasses this one time"), etc. So I always wear safety glasses rated for the color and wattage of the laser.

With that said, does anyone view their higher powered lasers by video? I think many of us are fascinated by the bright beams in the air and would prefer to see our lasers in all their colorful glory. School AV departments and local cable access stations often have lots of older, "expendable" video cameras around. If one of those catches a reflection, it is no loss.

Now, many of the more recent camcorders have color viewfinders. But has anyone here viewed lasers by video with a video visor? Most of the video visors I've found are self-contained with a "media player" built in, or they use proprietary connections to smart phones. Of those that take an external signal, everything appears to be analog (VGA or composite video). Anyone care to recommend a good visor?

In my searches, I also noted that many people use night-vision visors to view IR laser sights on firearms. I suppose that's one way to enjoy your IR lasers.

(Pardon me if there is another thread on this. I didn't find anything in a search.)
 

DashApple

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I've only used a cheap 12Mp video camera with a 2" LCD with the IR filter removed to see IR lasers around 800 - 980
 
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Metryq

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Must be very difficult to aim an IR laser without that kind of aid. Either that, or wait for the target to start melting and smoking. I've used fluorescing cards to check IR sensors in electronic devices, or video cameras to see the flicker of IR remotes. Those options have their drawbacks with high-power IR lasers.
 




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