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Three transmission holograms (video)

flogged

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I'm addicted to making these holograms now! It's not difficult.

Here's a picture of my hologram exposure area:


Everything rests on a board with bubblewrap under it. I've propped my brick laser pointer on the pot and the uncollimated output illuminates the hologram microcosm. For these transmission holograms the objects being holo'd rest in front of the hologram glass emulsion. A 1-2 second exposure is all that's required using this 75mW laser, immediately followed by about 8 minutes of time spent developing the film. Once the film is developed one shines an unfocused laser at the film to recreate the object, as seen in videos.

The third video below is the hologram created as seen in above picture. There's 7 inches of depth.

Hologram development chemicals:


Hologram film:


Less than $50.00 is all that's required to purchase film and developer. (integraf.com)

videos -

glass paperweight:


magnetic sculpture:


glass trinkets (see first picture above)


I want to add, these videos do not convey the beauty of the actual hologram.
 
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Sigurthr

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I ordered some film plates and developer the other day, I can't wait to make my own holograms. I understand for transmission the laser needs to shine on both the target and the film, and the interference from the reflection and direct light produces the image. I'm not clear on how reflection holograms work though, but I'm guessing the film plate is not exposed to direct laser light at all and relies on only the reflection from the target. I'm guessing though that reflection holograms require high contrast targets and a very limited depth of target.
 

flogged

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You're correct about the transmission holograms. I don't have much experience with the reflection holograms. For the few that I made I simply rested the glass containing the holographic emulsion on some coins and exposed to laser light.

Of course there are many tutorials online, including <integraf.com> where I purchased film and developer.
 

mendnwngs

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Very cool stuff.

Crap.. I really need to buy some supplies then..

How precise does the developing need to be?

I had a B&W Film darkroom for years, and all chem, and rinse water temps had to be a constant 68F, or else the pyro (developer) would throw the contrast way off, and the fix wouldn't set right (leaving silver that will destroy the pic in a few years)

It looks like your developing setup is pretty easy to klodge together.. Is it very temp / time tolerant?

Also, how do you end up expanding the beam? Just leave the focus lens off, and project from the LD itself?

I remember how difficult it was to get my optics clean enough to get an evenly expanded beam.. *shrug*

(EDIT): Okay.. Just ordered 2 packs of 2.5X2.5 plates, and a developing kit..

Should be here in a couple days..

What I want to know is: How long will the developing chemistry stay active once its all mixed up.. Thats the reason I *loved* my B&W developer (HC-110) the syrup lasted for-ever. (well, a year +) from the syrup, you could take any amount, and mix any dilution from that you wanted, but once mixed, it lasted a few days..
 
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flogged

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I don't have much experience with this either - these holograms are my first attempt. The development process is not difficult, nor very exacting. I followed the instructions included in the development kit. The difficult part is working in the dark. I used a illuminated watch to time things.

To realize the expanded beam all that's necessary (at least how I'm doing it) is to remove the lens - no optics are required for the shoestring apparatus I'm using. If you aren't using a diode laser then you will need optics to expand the beam.

According to the developer instructions the chemical solutions will last several months, or longer, until ready use. Once you've mixed them they're not good for more than a few hours apparently. I estimate one development kit will yield enough solution for 4 different nights of work, where I can develop about 7-10 of the 2.5" plates.
 
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mendnwngs

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Ah, okay.. so you can mix up only the amount of developer needed.. Cool..

Now I'm stalking the UPS man, waiting for my film, and chems to get here in the big brown toy truck :D
 




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