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think geek now stock 447nm CNI's for $199






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$200 for 5mW? Compared to CNI GB $270 for 500mW or more? $220 for DragonLasers 400mw? No I don't think so.
 

wbayw

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^^^^^It is true, but it will be very dim, you won't see the beam, maybe in a dark dusty room.
 
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I would think that this is actually a 405nm Laser...
They talk about DVD players and I know for a fact
that a Casio 445nm Laser at Threshold Current puts
out ~7mW.
They are stating <5mW and that host is quite small...

Or they could be using a low power 445-7nm LD that
will never output >20mW...


Jerry
 
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ZRTMWA

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I'm pretty sure its actually a 5mW 447nm (or 445nm whatevs). Have any laser enthusiasts taken apart an HD-DVD player? I think the article was saying that the reading diode in most HD-DVD players is a 447nm laser. It would explain the higher price tag. I personally can't remember seeing anyone on LPF ever take apart an HD-DVD player. Seeing as HD-DVD is now discontinued, it would be hard to find a player (and even harder for a burner) probably.

Edit: Here's some cheaper players but they are used and they're for the Xbox 360.

http://www.cowboom.com/store/productDetails.cfm?contentID=141193
 
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3zuli

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wondering how big part of the description ti true... :thinking:
It all started when a lone Japanese researcher, Shuji Nakamura, began working on developing a bright blue LED. After eight years of research the commercial blue LED was created. Two years later he had developed the diode for producing a blue laser. Using gallium nitride crystals (instead of zinc selenide) he was able to solve a problem that larger companies had been working on for years.
Blue Laser Pointer II

The much shorter wavelength of the blue laser is what enabled the next generation of high definition DVD players to come to market. It also completes the trilogy of basic colors (red, green, blue) that are now available for handheld laser pointers. The 447 nanometer blue laser light is sure to make all other laser pointers green with envy.

Why the high price point? Since blue lasers are still very new to the market (and until recently could only be purchased for thousands of dollars), they are unfortunately just as costly just as red and green lasers were when they first appeared for sale. Such is the price for being super cool and bleeding edge.
ONLY 2 years from first blue LED to 445nm LD :wtf:? [have I missed something?]
afaik BluRay (aka HD-DVD) is 405nm :wtf:?
I think first green pointer didn't cost <$50:wtf:
 
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Sounds like usual marketing BS to me. Though CNI claims these have a near TEM00 beam, so that rules out casio diodes right there.
 
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Grix

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I'm pretty sure its actually a 5mW 447nm (or 445nm whatevs). Have any laser enthusiasts taken apart an HD-DVD player? I think the article was saying that the reading diode in most HD-DVD players is a 447nm laser. It would explain the higher price tag. I personally can't remember seeing anyone on LPF ever take apart an HD-DVD player. Seeing as HD-DVD is now discontinued, it would be hard to find a player (and even harder for a burner) probably.

Edit: Here's some cheaper players but they are used and they're for the Xbox 360.

Microsoft HD DVD Player for Xbox 360 (9Z5-00013) - Cowboom Store

HD-DVD drives for Xbox 360 were originally where people got their PHR diodes from when 405nm diodes were just starting to get big :)

I am unsure of whether Xbox HD-DVD drives still use the phr or a weaker 405nm diode.
 
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They used this same description on their 473nm laser which was selling for $299, which didn't use any sort of InGaN diode at all; so I wouldn't pay any mind to the description. I'm sure its a turned-down 447.
 
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I'm curious about that. I get catalogs from think geek all the time. I though WL weren't FDA certified? But think geek sells them....
 
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I would think that this is actually a 405nm Laser...
They talk about DVD players and I know for a fact
that a Casio 445nm Laser at Threshold Current puts
out ~7mW.
They are stating <5mW and that host is quite small...

Or they could be using a low power 445-7nm LD that
will never output >20mW...


Jerry

They used this same description on their 473nm laser which was selling for $299, which didn't use any sort of InGaN diode at all; so I wouldn't pay any mind to the description. I'm sure its a turned-down 447.

Nichia does make a 50mW 447, as does Osram, in a 3.8mm can, so it's entirely possible it's one of them, for the power being so low.
 

Benm

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Dunno.. look at this picture: ThinkGeek :: Blue Laser Pointer II

It looks like bluray - non fluorescent things seem purple, while some of the book covers clearly fluoresce in a bluish white... I'm can tell for certain, but it sure is the exact thing i see using 405 nm myself.
 




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