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These glasses will protect me from this diode, right?

ObsessingLaserDude

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Oct 20, 2021
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Hello! I'm just wanting to make sure that I dont burn out my eyes while testing my diode. Its the Nichia Nubm44 7W 450nm laser module, and the goggles are the survival laser Eagle Pair 190-540nm OD6 slipover goggles. Thanks!
 



lasingfox

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May 2, 2020
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Hello! I'm just wanting to make sure that I dont burn out my eyes while testing my diode. Its the Nichia Nubm44 7W 450nm laser module, and the goggles are the survival laser Eagle Pair 190-540nm OD6 slipover goggles. Thanks!
survival lasers is kinda sketchy about ratings. some are straight up lies and theres a lot of inconsistency in the coverage. I wouldn't trust my eyes with SL for anything over half a watt never mind 7 watts of 450.. I'd go for OD7 190-532nm from Laserglow https://www.laserglow.com/product/AGF-Laser-Safety-Goggles
 

lasingfox

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Really? I've seen a few videos of Eagle Pair glasses being great.
they can do good but, theres been some recent tests where the OD below OD3 for OD6 rated goggles and the 15-4 IR goggles dont even reach OD 1 for the MAIN yag wavelength... they can do good but the inconsistency and lies about specs make them untrustworthy. its ultimitely up to you if you want to take that risk and trust them but personally, i wouldn't. styropyro actually removed his video recommending them so if that isn't proof enough, idk what is. there also graphs and convos in the survival laser open thread but thats kind of a trainwreck right now with the owner being super sketchy..
 

Shmackitup

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Which Eagle Pair are you looking at? The ones I have protect extremely well in the blue spectrum.
 

kecked

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Shoot the laser through them and measure what you see on the other side. No lies or false promises when you do that

when I say see I mean with a power meter! Not your eyes. Also don’t expect them to survive long term with full power focused on them. They likely will melt. Shoot say 100mw and measure that. They are not meant for prolonged blocking.
 

lasingfox

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Shoot the laser through them and measure what you see on the other side. No lies or false promises when you do that

when I say see I mean with a power meter! Not your eyes. Also don’t expect them to survive long term with full power focused on them. They likely will melt. Shoot say 100mw and measure that. They are not meant for prolonged blocking.
thats not the proper way to do it. first off, you'll ruin the goggles before your power meter has time to measure them, and the OD increases dramatically as they char.. even at low powers, you won't get an accurate reading. you need a proper spectrophotometer. and i'm guessing this guy doesn't have a LPM even if he wanted to do a sort of sanity check.

Which Eagle Pair are you looking at? The ones I have protect extremely well in the blue spectrum.
and yea they generally are good for blue but, why risk it? im not saying they've failed for blue but, i'm saying they've failed for yellow, green, IR in the past and they're still being listed as OD 4, 5, 7.. i wouldn't trust my eyes with that brand.
 

Mathewe

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Oct 3, 2021
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I might be WAY out of line here, but I'll say something, for whatever it is worth..;
You've got yourself a high power laser and a not so trustworthy piece of eye protection. You want to fire your laser, but might not feel safe in doing so, due to your questionable eye protection. Fear not, you can still fire that laser if you take proper precautions, as follows.
1)... Block off any chance of seeing the output of the laser by putting a tube (toilet paper roll, maybe) around the front of the laser. You do NOT want to be able to see the laser light coming out from the diode. That would be very bad!
2)... Likewise, use a tube, of some sort of terminating 'blinder' to trap any possible reflected light at the 'receiving' end where your laser beam hits. A well designed 'beam dump' wouldn't be a bad idea, either. Whatever the case may be... You do NOT want to see the beam hitting its target and reflecting light, either! Very bad, also!

It's safe to look at the beam, itself. You just don't want to see where that beam is coming from, nor see its light being reflected from whatever it is hitting. If you are using a bench type of power supply, to run the laser diode, you can wear your questionable glasses to properly 'aim' the laser, at very low power. Once properly aimed... "go for 'Throttle-Up'" and then look at the cool looking beam, provided you have added humidity, smoke, or something that will make the beam very visible. If you do not have a variable source of power, and you are either full on, or totally off... I can't help you. You'll need to purchase well known and well proven eye protection.
 

Psyrex

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Nov 9, 2021
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Is there any wide spectrum goggles that cover most wavelengths?
Or do I need to purchase several goggles?
thanks for your replies.
 




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