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Testing the "460nm Labbies" - Wavelength Results

rhd

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A little while back, many of us were intrigued by the emergence of the "460nm" lab modules on both eBay, and here on LPF.
http://laserpointerforums.com/f39/s...s-180mw-473nm-1w-460nm-400mw-532nm-67687.html

The big point of curiosity of course, was wavelength. A 460nm laser would be substantially brighter than a 445nm of the same power, and would even be noticeably closer to the cyan-range. I was initially interested in purchasing one, but held off until I had a calibrated spectrometer. Once I had a spectrometer up and running, I was getting prepared to purchase a "460nm" labby myself, when I lucked out and JMillerDoc offered to mail me his, have me test it, and then mail it back to him. The laser arrived today, and I've had a chance to put it through a few wavelength tests.

My subjective impression (what it IS):

Regardless of wavelength, I think this package was probably worth its $250 price tag. It's an analog modulated labby that seems well built. It also seems incredibly stable.

And the numbers (what it IS NOT):

What it isn't, is 460nm. Nor is it anything different from the M series diodes that DTR and others sell. I took three readings, at 60, 120, and 180 seconds.
In all three cases, the wavelength was tested as 452nm.

452nm in context:

452nm is a nice high wavelength, but it isn't abnormal or obscure. I won't go as far as to say that 452nm at 1A (assuming 1A here) is the "norm", but it's certainly not "rare" if you're using M-series diodes. If you've got a handful of M-series diodes on hand, a few of them will hit this wavelength at this current. I've attached the spectrometer reading for a recent build I did, the Ninja MKII. You'll see that it's actually 1nm higher in wavelength, and I hadn't even specifically chosen the diode for that build knowing its wavelength ahead of time.

Having tested a number of M (and now H) series diodes, I've seen wavelengths ranging from 444nm all the way up to 458nm. For this reason, I have no doubt that we could find a freak 460nm diode if we were all looking. But this aint it :(

So, in short - this is a nice lab unit, and it seems worth the $250 price tag. What it isn't, is a "460nm" laser, or even reasonably close to it.
 

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styropyro

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I appreciate the spectrometer reading, although I am disappointed that my modules are not what I advertized them to be. My original money back guarantee still holds to any buyer that is not satisfied with the wavelength.
 

rhd

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I appreciate the spectrometer reading, although I am disappointed that my modules are not what I advertized them to be. My original money back guarantee still holds to any buyer that is not satisfied with the wavelength.
They're nice units. I'm not familiar with the projector world, but these seem like a good deal to me. Everything is substantial. Nothing at all feels cheap. I would imagine that this setup could handle constant-on, no duty cycle type of usage.
 

Blord

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How is the dot ? Is it like the A/M140 diodes or the more round dot of the 450nm Osram diode
 

Jmillerdoc

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I should chime in here...I am a satisfied buyer...I knew going into this purchase there were no new diodes in this power range so it had to be a freak 445. It has a better dot than my three element lens builds, I assume from some correctional optics in the unit.

RHD, can you look at the power supply and determine if it would be easily adjustable? I have been meaning to do this but haven't.

What would be interesting is to get a hold of a few more of these units and see if any others are close to the 460 mark. 458 would be close enough for me to call a "460" but 452 should be advertised as such.

I am happy and will be keeping mine for now.

Styro, let me know when you get some more good 473's!
Jeff
 
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rhd

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The short answer is yes:
- There are four (4) pots inside the driver (I can see them through the "mesh" like metal casing)

The long answer is "but you'd want to know more first":
- There are four (4) pots inside the driver ;)
- You'd want a datasheet on the driver, or at least a pin-out of the connector so that you could make sure you knew exactly what you were adjusting.
 

styropyro

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I should chime in here...I am a satisfied buyer...I knew going into this purchase there were no new diodes in this power range so it had to be a freak 445. It has a better dot than my three element lens builds, I assume from some correctional optics in the unit.

RHD, can you look at the power supply and determine if it would be easily adjustable? I have been meaning to do this but haven't.

What would be interesting is to get a hold of a few more of these units and see if any others are close to the 460 mark. 458 would be close enough for me to call a "460" but 452 should be advertised as such.

I am happy and will be keeping mine for now.

Styro, let me know when you get some more good 473's!
Jeff
I'm glad that you are still satisfied, if you ever are interested in something of mine for sale in the future I will give you a discount for the false advertising on my part. I have some nice 473nm lasers that you may be interested in, check out my sales thread here: http://laserpointerforums.com/f39/fs-lots-laser-stuff-cheap-want-sell-asap-cheap-473nm-70830.html
 
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For this reason, I have no doubt that we could find a freak 460nm diode if we were all looking. But this aint it :(
460 nm diodes exist so their power is not measured in Watts only mW.

As for a color comparison it is close to 473 nm. It was necessary to switch some brains cells to see a difference. 473 had a drop of greenish hue. Though there was a big difference 460 vs 438. A camera messed up these colors. Nothing to show. :undecided:
 

Arayan

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Very nice test :)

can you tell me the brand and specifications of the spectrometer? Thanks :D
 

Arayan

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It's the standard science surplus spectrometer. Haven't reinvented the wheel.
I'm just curious, because I always used spectrophotometers and I have never seen a spectrometer that directly measures the wavelength of light. I ask because I'd like to buy one.
 

Cyparagon

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That's because a spectrophotometer isn't the same thing as a spectrometer.
 




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