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Space Discussion Thread

paul1598419

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I saw that in the news. I figured the amount of ice was 12.7 miles across a cube of that volume of ice. That is quite a lot of water on the surface, as it hasn't sublimated away.
 



BowtieGuy

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Very nice E and E, those are some cool coins, thanks for sharing!
Too bad that the postage isn't still 18 cents.
 
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Edit 6/2/16:
We've diverged into a wide range of different space related topics outside of interstellar, so I'm changing the prompt and title of the thread from "Interstellar Space Travel" to "Space Discussion Thread". The original topic is still relevant, but feel free to post about anything else space-related.

So far, we've talked about the challenges and demand for FTL, a little bit of astronomy, a little bit of physics, propulsion technology, space suits, terraforming, solar system exploration, colonization, and more.


**Original***********************************************************************
Do you guys think we're ever going to be capable of interstellar space travel? What do you think it'll be like?

Even though space technology has sped up a lot with privatization, I still think we aren't innovating fast enough.

There's a lot of hype about a Martian colony, but it's currently bound to be disappointing for most of us and unreasonable for civilian life. I think that the only way humanity will be able to truly inhabit another planet is to find one that's very similar to Earth, but the only ones are outside our solar system.

Problem is that we're still pretty far from any technology that could get a human to a different solar system within their lifespan.

What do you all think?
*******************************************************************************
Edit 6/2/16:
We've diverged into a wide range of different space related topics outside of interstellar, so I'm changing the prompt and title of the thread from "Interstellar Space Travel" to "Space Discussion Thread". The original topic is still relevant, but feel free to post about anything else space-related.

So far, we've talked about the challenges and demand for FTL, a little bit of astronomy, a little bit of physics, propulsion technology, space suits, terraforming, solar system exploration, colonization, and more.


**Original***********************************************************************
Do you guys think we're ever going to be capable of interstellar space travel? What do you think it'll be like?

Even though space technology has sped up a lot with privatization, I still think we aren't innovating fast enough.

There's a lot of hype about a Martian colony, but it's currently bound to be disappointing for most of us and unreasonable for civilian life. I think that the only way humanity will be able to truly inhabit another planet is to find one that's very similar to Earth, but the only ones are outside our solar system.

Problem is that we're still pretty far from any technology that could get a human to a different solar system within their lifespan.

What do you all think?
*******************************************************************************
[/QU
 

RB astro

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Awesome Tero, thanks for the heads-up buddy.
I love Jupiter (and Saturn.... and Mars).
They're quite a sight and I highly recommend taking a look at them.
You'll be blown away when you see Jupiter and it's moons dancing the celestial dance each night (using Binoculars).
Awesome when you get to see a 'Transit', when one or more of the moons (Io, Europa, Ganymede and/or Callisto) 'transit' the face of Jupiter and you get to see it's shadow on Jupiter... but you'll need a scope for that.
Here's a website that has an animation of what's going on in real time.

You'll love Saturn doing the hula-hoop too.
Should be able to pick up the rings in a pair of Binoculars.

And why not throw Mars in there too, but you'll need a 'big' scope to see any detail.

Here's a few pics I took way back (circa) 2005-2006.
Keep in mind these are my very early attempts, I haven't tried imaging them recently.

Hope you like !

Jupiter and its moons, doing the celestial dance.
65068

65069

65070

Saturn, doing the hula-hoop.

65072

Mars, doing what Mars does best, being Mars.... :ROFLMAO:

65073

RB
 

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Ears and Eggs

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Wow, awesome pictures. That's really cool the one where you can actually make out Io's yellow coloration. I have a relatively small scope (90mm refractor) and I was able to clearly make out the cloud belts on Jupiter when I was out Thursday night. Not ideal conditions here either, very humid, and Jupiter is low on the horizon here in Ottawa, Canada now.

Definitely worth it to take a look even with a pair of average binoculars though. I could see the Galilean Moons even through my finder scope.
 

RB astro

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Wow, awesome pictures. That's really cool the one where you can actually make out Io's yellow coloration. I have a relatively small scope (90mm refractor) and I was able to clearly make out the cloud belts on Jupiter when I was out Thursday night. Not ideal conditions here either, very humid, and Jupiter is low on the horizon here in Ottawa, Canada now.

Definitely worth it to take a look even with a pair of average binoculars though. I could see the Galilean Moons even through my finder scope.
Thanks E&E, glad you like them.
Well done on viewing Jupiter's cloud belts.
(y)

Astro, those are some awesome pics. How did you take them.. camera mounted to a telescope?
Thank you blazingfire, I'm glad you enjoyed them.
For the planets I used a basic webcam connected straight into my telescope.
Keep in mind that these days there are dedicated cameras for this, but back in 2005 we used webcams.

We'd make up a special little plastic nosepiece that screwed into the webcam and slip that into the telescope focuser with no eyepiece.
Essentially the webcam took the place of the eyepiece.
Webcams were better suited than say a DSLR because the webcam sensor size was better suited to planet photography.
Then we'd take a short video and use the individual frames from that video to process into a single image.
This minimises and smooths out any variable atmospheric blurring that takes place when you take just a single shot.
You use your best and sharpest frames from that short video to combine into a single photo instead.

Like I said these were my early attempts at planet photography.
I soon moved into deep space astrophotography instead and have not tried planet photog again.
I might go back and try my hand again when I get some time.

:)
 

blazingfire

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I have a 100-400mm lens right now and since Jupiter should be showing up at night was thinking maybe I can get some decent pictures out of it. Sorta wish I had bought a sky tracker though.
 

RB astro

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I have a 100-400mm lens right now and since Jupiter should be showing up at night was thinking maybe I can get some decent pictures out of it. Sorta wish I had bought a sky tracker though.
Will you be using a Canon Full Frame or APS-C?
You won't need a tracker until you start using more focal length.
Use a tripod and your lens at 400mm.
Use manual live focus at 10x to focus on Jupiter as the camera will have a hard time to autofocus on the planet.
Best to use Mirror Lockup and a 2 sec delay to minimise shutter vibration.
Do not use Image Stabilisation on your lens if on a tripod, disable it.
Put White Balance to "Sunny" only and use ISO around 400 or 800 (depending on conditions) and play around with the shutter speed so that it doesn't blow out the highlights on Jupiter but allows the moons to show up too.
You'll see Jupiter as a small dot and it's moons next to it as tiny dots.
Use the website I linked to so you can see the position of the moons at that time.

Let us know how you go.
RB

(y)
 

RB astro

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Using a Sony 100-400mm GM on a Sony A7R iii Mirrorless. I'll be shooting raw as well. But yeah, hopefully I can get a good shot of Jupiter. I took this picture of the moon few months back.
Superb moon shot buddy.
I look forward to what you get shooting Jupiter.
Make sure you share with us.

RB
(y)

BTW here's another shot of Jupiter I took back in 2005.
No Jovian moons visible this time but you can see the GRS (Great Red Spot) which is (as you know) a raging storm on Jupiter many times bigger than the earth itself!

Jupiter.jpg
 




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