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Shout Out From Minnesota! Applying Infrared Lasers to DIY Nightvision > Thermo & IR

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BrittanyGulden

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Shout Out From Minnesota! Applying Infrared Lasers to DIY Nightvision > Thermo & IR

Hey guys!

I am in the process of building a Nightvision Scope for my Rilfe! I have messed around W/ using L.E.D.'s to do IR on my Video Cam, but it was only good for shorter distances. Than I started using Reflectors from various flashlights to "beam and focus" to reach greater distances W/ night vision. That worked better, however I only could reach out so far. Than I was introduced into Thermal Vision. I just swapped out the IR lense from my Camera and repalced it with a Negative Lense and BAM, Thermal Vision!

I am trying to apply "night vision" to my rifle. Issue is I don't know whether or not I will be able to see my Cross Airs/Reticles on my scope. I take it placement of Night Vision, before or after scope will judge whether or not I will be able to see my reticles.

Anyways I was thinkin about ditching the scope and heading with some sort of Screen/monitor that would allow me to view IR and/or Thermal vision. This screen would have to act as both a monitor and a lense (if ya know what I mean)

Now, I know what you're saying. What would I use for Cross airs? Well I was thinking about using an Infrared Laser and ONLY I would be able to see the Infrared Laser through my SCreen/monitor.

Cool thing is, I could mount another Cam Atop my monitor and now that laser serves as a range finder also. Most range finders use laser pointers in a triangular configuration to find distance. THere's a mathematical formula for it. I was thinking about doing this and having the distance project on my Screen/monitor as like a digital read.

Problem is, If I were to ditch the scope, I wouldn't have a "Zoom" and not sure how I would go about making one.


Thanks for your time and go easy on me lol!
 

Ablaze

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Re: Shout Out From Minnesota! Applying Infrared Lasers to DIY Nightvision > Thermo &

That's quite a project you have there. I wish you good luck.

You should be aware of the safety concerns with IR lasers. Even though you can't see them they can still burn the rods and cones in your eye. I suspect you would probably want ~100mw of IR which you can find cheap but I HIGHLY suggest you use a focusable host and jam it so that it cannot focus into a dot.

There are defiantly devices out there that do exactly the sort of things you are trying to do. They cost a lot of money generally, it would be interesting to see what you come up with yourself :)

Please read up on laser safety. Remember, all high powered lasers can be dangerous, even the ones you can't see.
 
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Re: Shout Out From Minnesota! Applying Infrared Lasers to DIY Nightvision > Thermo &

I do believe I have seen scopes that have illuminated reticules :thinking:


. Issue is I don't know whether or not I will be able to see my Cross hairs/Reticles on my scope. I take it placement of Night Vision, before or after scope will judge whether or not I will be able to see my reticles.
 
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BrittanyGulden

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Re: Shout Out From Minnesota! Applying Infrared Lasers to DIY Nightvision > Thermo &

That's quite a project you have there. I wish you good luck.

You should be aware of the safety concerns with IR lasers. Even though you can't see them they can still burn the rods and cones in your eye. I suspect you would probably want ~100mw of IR which you can find cheap but I HIGHLY suggest you use a focusable host and jam it so that it cannot focus into a dot.

There are defiantly devices out there that do exactly the sort of things you are trying to do. They cost a lot of money generally, it would be interesting to see what you come up with yourself :)

Please read up on laser safety. Remember, all high powered lasers can be dangerous, even the ones you can't see.


This device would only be used at night so I am not too worried about the IR Laser being Reflected into My eye. The only thing it may reflect off of is water, and it woud be more of a ricochet vs a direct reflection.

*Thing I do not know is Can "Zooming" in on a laser damage my eyes? Obviously the laser wouldn't be pointing at me. I have seen quite a few times on here people posting pictures of their laser "dots," so it must not be bad for your eyes? However, I will be using a Lense of Some sort (like scope) to Zoom in on it.
 
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BrittanyGulden

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Re: Shout Out From Minnesota! Applying Infrared Lasers to DIY Nightvision > Thermo &

I do believe I have seen scopes that have illuminated reticules :thinking:


. Issue is I don't know whether or not I will be able to see my Cross hairs/Reticles on my scope. I take it placement of Night Vision, before or after scope will judge whether or not I will be able to see my reticles.


Yes, I have a few. I have a few "Red Dots" and a 2 other scopes with Illuminated Reticals. In my scenerio, I wouldn't really need a "scope." I would rather have a smaller screen of some sort and use an IR laser as my Cross airs/reticals.

You may ask why......

The nice thing about using a screen is that you can make them Detachable so It could also serve as a "viewer." LOL, Unless ya want me swingin my rifle around using it see ha


Thanks for the responses guys! keep em coming!
 

Ablaze

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Re: Shout Out From Minnesota! Applying Infrared Lasers to DIY Nightvision > Thermo &

*Thing I do not know is Can "Zooming" in on a laser damage my eyes? Obviously the laser wouldn't be pointing at me. I have seen quite a few times on here people posting pictures of their laser "dots," so it must not be bad for your eyes? However, I will be using a Lense of Some sort (like scope) to Zoom in on it.
Viewing a laser on a camera screen will not hurt your eyes. If you're zooming in using a set of lenses then there's a good chance it will.

A high enough powered laser will cause eye damage just from looking at the dot when it is shining on a tree or a wall. IR lasers are more dangerous than visible lasers since they won't cause cause the blink reflex and you might be causing permanent damage without knowing it.

If you really want a focused dot you could have company, run into someone, or accidentally leave your IR targeter on. There are some serious safety concerns with your device as you describe it.
 
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BrittanyGulden

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Re: Shout Out From Minnesota! Applying Infrared Lasers to DIY Nightvision > Thermo &

Viewing a laser on a camera screen will not hurt your eyes. If you're zooming in using a set of lenses then there's a good chance it will.

A high enough powered laser will cause eye damage just from looking at the dot when it is shining on a tree or a wall. IR lasers are more dangerous than visible lasers since they won't cause cause the blink reflex and you might be causing permanent damage without knowing it.

If you really want a focused dot you could have company, run into someone, or accidentally leave your IR targeter on. There are some serious safety concerns with your device as you describe it.
Lenses? So if One were to take a Stand Still Camera W/ a High Powered Zoom and "zoom" in on an IR dot, it could damage your eyes assuming that this would be at night and your Camara can pick up IR.

I can see this happening if you were to use a Camera that would require you to actually put your eye up to the Lense and focus in on the laser dot. However, what if you are using a video camera and viewing the dot through an LCD Screen?

...How can that damage your eyes? Hard to explain but it'd be like going on Youtube and watching Videos of Welding without you wearing safety goggles and having that damage your eyes.

It can't.


On your 2nd Paragraph. I guess I need to figure out my above ^ statement before I can answer this one, but take a look at this:

An Example: Let's assume we have a laser diode optical output of 1.0 watt, and a pupil size of 1/4" in your eye (dilated at night). If we shine that 1w directly into your eye, you'll be blind instantly. But if we put the 1w through a lens, and spread it out into a circular area, we should just need to have a large enough circle so that the fraction that would go into your eye is a safe amount. Since the area of a circle is π * r^2, we can just figure the fraction of the pupil's area to the larger circle's area. We just need to set an eye-safe level, which I'll call 1mW. So we have (laser power) * (π * (1/4")^2) / (π * r^2) = 1mW, hence 1000 * (1/16) / (r^2) = 1, and r equals roughly 8 inches, or a circle of 16 inches diameter. This means that if you have 1 watt of light, going through a lens, and spreading out into a 16 inch circle of light, and that shines directly into your eye, your eye will see 1 milliwatt of the energy.



And your last paragraph, I understand what I am getting into and will be taking precautions. I am sure there is a "safety block" that I can apply to the end of my device to "stop" the IR laser (ofcourse, because you can't see it with the naked eye)

Running into someone is never a problem, I can assure you that. All of my hunting is done on Private Property, most of which is done between 2 -4 a.m. and in the Heart of Winter. Chances of me shooting my laser across at someone is very slim.

I am not a poacher, I hunt Coon, yote & fox. Too faint of heart to trap. Just not humane enough. The varmits I harvest are varmits that land owners (or myself) want or need to be taken off property for various reasons. Last weekend I had a guy call up w/ a pair of Coyotes taking down a smaller horse on his ranch.

I had to note on the above^, I would like to keep this "Night Vision Geared" and not have it turn into an Animal Humane thread.


Thankyou for your responses! I really appreciate them. Sadly there isn't much around Mankato, MN for people to go to for knowledge
 




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