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Samsung prototype laser projector 7000 lumens

Curiously_Coherent

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Hey folks,

Just noticed this article about Samsung's new prototype short-throw LASER projector. It projects a 100-inch image 7000 lumens bright. It's a whole new class of product. Here's the link: http://www.macworld.com/article/140043/2009/04/sanyo_projector.html

Do you think they're using R,G & B diodes? It has a colour gamut of 170% over LCD so it should be spectacular to see.

It's still a prototype and 10G+ but it's the future direction of displays and it bodes well for future diodes. ;)

Cheers, CC
 

ElektroFreak

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IIRC most of those types of prototype displays are currently using diode reds, and DPSS green and blue. My source of info may be a little outdated, though.
 

pullbangdead

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It may actually be DPSS for all of them, but it's definitely DPSS for green and probably blue as well.

It's a prototype, and future ones when diodes will be available will be much smaller, but that thing is HUGE! Cool, but huge! 2.4 meters wide, it really is a piece of furniture.

Awesome technology coming down the pipes in the near future.
 

Cyparagon

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Curiously_Coherent said:
It's still a prototype and 10G+
Try 1000g+

2300 lumens per color... To get 2300 lumens from a green laser, I calculate ~3.8W. Assuming a 2:1:4 ratio for RGB, that's 7W of blue and 14W of red. Then add the optics, electronics, enclosure, engineering costs... How can that be done for anything less than 7 figures?
 

pullbangdead

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It WILL be a green diode, but it's not a green diode. Look here, for example: http://www.microvision.com/technology/benefits.html

"Three primary colors, (red, green, blue) are used to generate the full-color images we commonly see in televisions, computers, and video displays. Red lasers are established and widely available in commercial products today; blue and green lasers are coming shortly. Developments in these compact blue and green lasers will enable a new generation of products capable of generating full color images. "

Microvision isn't using green or blue diodes in the products, they may even be using the Necsel (described below); and I've read the Necsel it what Mitsubishi is using in their LaserVue TVs.

-------------------------------------------

The more applicable/comparable technology to what's in these things right now is to look at a thing called the "Necsel", made by "Novalux" (or at least it was made by Novalux, I think they've been bought or sold once or twice now). It's basically a tiny DPSS package, or something close to it at least. Here's an old story about this: http://news.thomasnet.com/companystory/492524

This big Sanyo device would likely be akin to a huge Necsel set up, with what amounts to 3 lab lasers in it.

ETA: Here's a blog post about Microvision using the Necsel, and Mitsubishi using it as well: http://microvision.sdh.cx/2008/04/necsel-lasers-microvision-no-more.html
 

GooeyGus

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Novalux's prototype Necsel devices emit 3 watts at 465- and 532-nm and 750 mW at 620 nm-all from a revolutionary package smaller than a matchbox.
That is just insane...

I read that these are surface emitting diodes, are these electrically pumped VCSEL or is it doing something similar to OPSL?
 




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