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Review of the 200mW Red "Dilda" Laser Module

The_LED_Museum

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Please note that while this is an older laser, it is still very readily available both new and used, so I believe that this post is kosher here.
This is a long page with at least 31 images on it; dial-up users please allow for plenty of load time.

200mW Red "Dilda" Laser Module, retail $27.09 (www.dealextreme.com/details.dx...)
Manufactured by (Unknown)
Last updated 03-18-12




This is a high-powered laser module that operates from two CR2 lithium cells. It is nicknamed "The Dilda" on many websites because its distinctive dildo-shaped body. It generates a red beam (measured spectrographically at 662nm) with enough power to burn, destroy, punch holes in things, etc., and it has a low enough current consumption that you won't be running to the store for batteries every day or two.

The optical power output is advertised at 200mW; though I do not have an instrument that can measure power levels this high (See below -- I do now as of 07-07-11!!!), it produces effects consistent with a high-powered laser: it destroys balloons rather quickly, ignites tobacco, causes smoke to issue from a mousepad, burns the black sides of the vanes in a Crooke's radiometer, causes a tactile heat sensation on exposed flesh, etc.


SIZE



Feed the laser two new CR2 lithium cells first (see directly below), and THEN you can go irradiate something.

Press the button on the tailcap until it clicks to turn the laser on; repeat the same action to turn it back off.
This is continuous or hands-free mode.

Press the same button more lightly (before it clicks) and hold it that way for as long as you need the intense red spot, and release it to turn the laser off.
This is momentary or signalling mode.

The beam divergence (focus) is adjustable simply by turning the bezel (the domed end of the laser) one way or the other.
Counterclockwise brings the focal point closer; clockwise moves the focal point farther away.



To change the batteries in your 200mW red laser module, unscrew and remove the tailcap, and set it aside

Tip the two used CR2 lithium cells out of the barrel and into your hand, and dispose of or recycle them as you see fit.

Insert two new CR2 lithium cells into the barrel, button-end (+) positive first. This is the opposite of how batteries are installed in most other laser pointers/laser modules, so please pay attention to polarity here.

Screw the tailcap back on, and be done with it.

Current usage measures 280mA on my DMM's 4A scale.


***EXTREMELY IMPORTANT!!!***
This laser is a CDRH Class IIIb instrument because of its high output power; so you definitely do not want to shine it into your eyes, other people's eyes, pets' eyes, for that matter, the eyes of any person or animal you encounter.
Eye damage can occur faster than the blink reflex can protect them, regardless of what species' eyes you irradiate with this laser. So just don't do it.

And for Christ sakes (and for heaven sakes and for Pete sakes and your sakes too) do not shine this laser at any vehicle, whether ground-based like a motorcycle, car, or truck, or air-based like a helicopter, airplane, or jet. And if you shoot it at a person in the dark and he turns out to be a police officer, he may think he's being targeted, unholster (pull out) his gun, and hose you down with it.


The collimating assembly feels loose, despite the presence of a spring between the laser diode assembly and the collimator assembly.
The collimating assembly goes out of your preferred setting through just casual handling; to hold it in your preferred position, you may use a small piece of tape.

There is a spring between the collimating assembly and the laser's barrel; please be careful not to lose it if you unscrew the collimator so much that you remove it. If the collimating assembly is intentionally removed, please be certain to place the spring where it will not become lost or go up the vacuum cleaner so you'll have it handy when you reassemble the laser later on.





Beam photograph (collimated) on the test target at 12".
The spiking you see is a camera artifact; the beam has a very clean appearance to it in reality.
Beam image also bloomed *SIGNIFICANTLY*.
The white & yellow color you see was also caused by the camera.
Power output is significantly too high to measure with the instruments at my disposal
(See below; this has been rectified as of 07-07-11!!!).



Beam photograph (collimating ass'y removed) on the test target at 12".



Beam photograph on a wall at ~10 feet.
The spiking you see is a camera artifact; the beam has a very clean appearance to it in reality.
Beam image also bloomed *SIGNIFICANTLY*.
The white color you see was also caused by the camera.

Those rectangular graphic things in the upper left quadrant of this photograph are marquees from:

Atari ''Tempest''
Nintendo ''R-Type''
Konami ''Super Cobra''
Midway ''Omega Race''
Sega ''Star Trek''
Williams ''Joust''
Venture Line ''Looping''
Universal ''Mr. Do!'s Castle''
Jaleco ''Exerion''
Gremlin/Sega ''Astro Blaster''
Gottlieb ''Q*bert''

upright coin-op arcade video games from the 1980s.

That graphic toward the right is:
A "BIG SCARY LASER" poster sent by www.megagreen.co.uk

Below the "Big Scary Laser" poster is a calendar my sister gave me.

And that clock to the right of the "Big Scary Laser" poster is an Infinity Optics Clock.



Photograph of the laser spot at ~200 feet.
That diagonal "spike" you see is a camera artifact, and does not actually exist in the laser's beam.
Photograph was taken at 4:31am PDT 03-24-08.
There was a bush between the laser and the target; that's why you see some red glow there as well.
4x zoom was used for this photograph.



Another photograph of the laser spot at ~200 feet.
That diagonal "spike" you see is a camera artifact, and does not actually exist in the laser's beam.
Photograph was taken at 5:41am PDT 03-24-08.
4x zoom was used for this photograph.



Photograph of the CDRH label.
This appears to be a rather generic label; there were pen marks checked in the most appropriate boxes,
but the markings wore off before I could photograph them.



Photograph of one side of the driver circuit board.


Photograph of the other side of the driver circuit board.



Spectrographic analysis of this laser.



Spectrographic analysis of this laser; spectrometer's response narrowed to a range of 650nm to 670nm.
Peak wavelength appears to be 661.5nm, with a spectral line halfwidth of ~1.5nm.



Spectrographic analysis of this laser (newer equipment & software used); spectrometer's response narrowed to a range of 650nm to 670nm.
Peak wavelength appears to be 662.55nm, with a spectral line halfwidth of ~2.2nm.



Spectrographic analysis of this laser; below lasing threshold.



Spectrographic analysis of this laser to check for wavelength drift following the "balls to the wall" stability analysis; spectrometer's response narrowed to a range of 650nm to 670nm.
Peak wavelength appears to be 659.352nm, with a spectral line halfwidth of ~2.80nm.

USB2000 Spectrometer graciously donated by P.L.



Beam cross-sectional analysis; collimating assembly removed.



Beam cross-sectional analysis; collimating assembly removed.
X-axis (fast axis).



Beam cross-sectional analysis; collimating assembly removed.
Y-axis (slow axis).

Images made using the ProMetric System by Radiant Imaging.



Measures 236mW on a LaserBee 2.5W USB Laser Power Meter w/Thermopile.



Second measurement: measures 207mW on the same meter.



Third measurement: measures 213mW on the same meter.


A fourth measuerment: measures 206mW on the same meter.



Stability analysis cum battery discharge analysis run using a pair of RCR2 cells from my LZIR808-200 808nm Infrared Invisible Burning Portable Laser.
Runs for 2,306 seconds (38.4 minutes) to 50% power output.
Laser temperature (case temperature measured where the laser diode is) was measured at 105°F (40.55°C) when this analysis was 1,285 seconds in.


WMP movie (.avi extension) showing the product burning a mousepad.
This clip is approximately 1.88 megabytes (1,980,916 bytes) in length; dial-up users please be aware.
It will take no less than seven minutes to load at 48.0Kbps.

An episode of "The Fairly OddParents" was playing on the boob tube when this recording was made.
This product is not sound-sensitive; the sound may be ignored or muted if it torques you off.



Video on YourTube showing the laser causing a balloon to "destruct".
This clip is approximately 0.60 megabytes (617,234 bytes) in length; dial-up users please be aware.
It will take no less than two and a half minutes to load at 48.0Kbps.

An episode of "The Fairly OddParents" was playing on the boob tube when this recording was made.
You should also hear the sound of the explosive decompression of the balloon.
This product is not sound-sensitive; the sound may be ignored or muted if it pisses you off.




Video of the 200mW Red "Dilda" Laser Module destroying a purple balloon.

I cannot provide any of these videos in other formats, so please do not ask.



TEST NOTES:
Test unit was purchased on the DealExtreme website on 03-07-08, and was received on the afternoon of 03-19-08.


UPDATE: 04-11-08
With just one CR2 cell installed, current usage measures 45mA and the unit appears to be rather dim - right at lasing threshold or perhaps just below.
Open-circuit voltage of the CR2 cell was 3.022 volts.
This tells me that the product probably isn't regulated, but that it *DOES* have a driver circuit in it.


UPDATE: 07-11-11
I learned from somebody over at Laser Pointer Forums that by applying teflon tape (most commonly found in the plumbing supplies part of a hardware store) to the threads that the collimating assembly screws onto, the collimating ass'y itself will fit much more snugly and the focus setting you give it won't be nearly as readily lost through casual handling as it was before using the tape.


PROS:
Exceptionally brilliant red laser beam
Beam focus is easily adjustable
Reasonably durable metal body


CONS:
Beam focus is perhaps...TOO EASILY adjustable
Uses batteries that may be expensive and/or difficult to find




MANUFACTURER: Unknown/not stated
PRODUCT TYPE: Red-emitting laser module
LAMP TYPE: Directly-injected red diode laser
No. OF LAMPS: 1
BEAM TYPE: Adjustable collimator; varies between pinpoint spot to medium spot w/sharp perimeter
SWITCH TYPE: Pushbutton on/momentary/off on tailcap
CASE MATERIAL: Metal
BEZEL: Metal; laser diode protected by a lens
BATTERY: 2xCR2 cells
CURRENT CONSUMPTION: 280mA
WATER-RESISTANT: Very light splatter-resistant at maximum
SUBMERSIBLE: NO WAY, HOZAY!

ACCESSORIES: None
SIZE: 5.05" (128.0mm) L, 0.65" (17.0mm) D
WEIGHT: 2.7oz (76.545g)
WARRANTY: 30 days


PRODUCT RATING:




Update 07-09-11: Performed a third power output measurement on my LaserBee LPM.

Update 07-11-11: Moved one of the videos to YourTube; also added info. re: collimator & teflon tape.

Update 07-16-11: Added another video of the laser destroying a balloon.

Update 03-18-12: Performed a long-term stability cum battery discharge analysis and post-test spectroscopy to check for wavelength drift.
 
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weeba2kv

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But do NOT connect this dila laser to your computer USB +5 volt ! that will kill it after 5 min

The click butten are usually verry weak and break down fast

still a nice laser though.
 

lasersbee

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But do NOT connect this dila laser to your computer USB +5 volt ! that will kill it after 5 min

The click butten are usually verry weak and break down fast

still a nice laser though.
Did I miss something in the text.....:thinking:
Where do you see him powering the Laser from the USB
port of a computer...:thinking:

@LED_M
BTW... I use Teflon tape on the Threads of the lens housing
on my Dildas... They are a lot more snug and the focus
doesn't change by itself when handled.

What is the dip in the power graph....:thinking:


Jerry
 
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The_LED_Museum

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...What is the dip in the power graph....:thinking:

Jerry
Good afternoon Jerry,

I honestly don't know what caused that; my best guess here is that my Dilda went out of "regulation" or some similar electronic cause. :question:
 

lasersbee

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Errmm.... you know that you are allowed to take more
than one reading per Laser with your LaserBee.....:whistle::D

Jerry
 

lasersbee

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Are they the same Batteries or Freshly recharged....:thinking:
Was the LaserBee sitting for a minute or two before taking
the 2nd reading..:thinking:
Did you touch the Sensor's heatsink before taking the 2nd
reading.:thinking:

The reason I ask is because any of those 3 things can cause
a slightly lower reading...:beer:

Jerry
 

zeppo

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These are impressive lasers for the money. However, it is important to note that the wavelength of the red is close to the invisible range, which makes them more dangerous. Your eyes will not warn you about harmful levels. If it looks bright it is probably too much intensity, especially when it's focused.
 

weeba2kv

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No sorry i was just addign extra information cause mine died after 5 min running on my USB power , kinda weird ...
 

lasersbee

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These are impressive lasers for the money. However, it is important to note that the wavelength of the red is close to the invisible range, which makes them more dangerous. Your eyes will not warn you about harmful levels. If it looks bright it is probably too much intensity, especially when it's focused.

I disagree...


As can be seen in the Human Eye response curve the 660nm
wavelength is easily seen by the human eye. There is no IR in
660nm...

You should be wearing appropriate Laser Safety Goggles/Glasses
if operating a Laser of this Power to begin with...


Jerry
 

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The_LED_Museum

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Are they the same Batteries or Freshly recharged....:thinking:
Was the LaserBee sitting for a minute or two before taking
the 2nd reading..:thinking:
Did you touch the Sensor's heatsink before taking the 2nd
reading.:thinking:

The reason I ask is because any of those 3 things can cause
a slightly lower reading...:beer:

Jerry
Let's see here...
1: Freshly-charged batteries -- same as with the chart you see farther down this post.
2: I always allow the LaserBee to reach "0mW", then press the red button on the unit shortly prior to irradiating its sensor for a new reading.
3: No.


The value is lower (213mW), but there is no "hitch" in the chart.
 
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lasersbee

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Great...

Just one thing.... you need to wait an additional 30 seconds
after the reading comes down to Zero and before pressing
the Red button if you have just taken a reading.
This is especially important after numerous higher powered
tests...

I would say the 1st chart was off for some unknown reason.

The new chart (207mW)(212) looks more like the Dildas that
I have power tested in the shop..


Jerry
 
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The_LED_Museum

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Great...

Just one thing.... you need to wait an additional 30 seconds
after the reading comes down to Zero and before pressing
the Red button if you have just taken a reading.
This is especially important after numerous higher powered
tests...Jerry
That's never been a problem...by the time I get everything set up to take a reading, significantly more than 30 seconds have elapsed since the reading from the last measurement has decreased to zero and I get that red button pressed. :)
 

lasersbee

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That's never been a problem...by the time I get everything set up to take a reading, significantly more than 30 seconds have elapsed since the reading from the last measurement has decreased to zero and I get that red button pressed. :)
Then you've got it nailed down pat.....;)

Jerry
 




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