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Removing the PCB from cells.

LaZeRz

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I know there are many tutorials, walkthroughs etc. on how to remove the PCB from protected cells but I thought i'd make a new one just to show my way of doing it with a 16340 battery :D

Ok, first of all, cut a straight line through the side of the battery but becareful to not cut into the metal ribbon going down the side...

34h8fer.jpg


Next you want to open up the battery by removing the wrapper carefully. You want to save the wrapper ovbiously for later...

2f0ak35.jpg


Now you want to remove the white ring thingymabob of the top of the battery. It will come off in two layers so dont worry if you cant get the bottom half of it off...

mlmseu.jpg


Now once you've removed the top layer of the white thingy you want to cut the metal ribbon seperating it from the positive contact point of the battery WITHOUT SHORT CIRCUITING IT. You cant let anything metal thats touching the positive contact point come in to contact with the body of the cell because the body is all NEGATIVE....If you accidentaly create a short do'nt be scared to disconnect it quickly.

2meo2du.jpg


Once the ribbon is seperated from the positive contact point you want to grab it with your needle nose pliers and pull it and the PCB (Protection Circuit Board) off the bottom of the battery...You also want to remove the remaining ribbon of the positive contact point by twisting it off (without making shorts)

2s1szmp.jpg


Now you have a bare cell sitting right in front of you...

9rnjud.jpg


Grab the white retaining lid thingy and put some glue on it...

nbulp0.jpg


then stick it back on to the positive end of the battery...

1gsmfa.jpg


You now want to grab the cells wrapper and trim a bit off the end (negative side)

juu6n9.jpg


Now hold the wrapper tightly around the battery and put a thin strip of tape on it to hold it together...

fav4w2.jpg


Trim the tape and push the battery up to the top of the wrapper. You will have some excess wrapper on the end of the battery and all you need to do is trim it with a pair of scissors and voila! your done! :D

vhyk4h.jpg


4v4eiv.jpg


jt8hoi.jpg


34xfepl.jpg


Now that you've removed the PCB from your battery becareful not to overcharge/overdischarge...

Dont let the batteries voltage drop to 2.6 volts or lower...


Thanks for looking :cool:
 
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Fiddy

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Good idea! re-wrapping the cell looks a lot cleaner :gj:
 
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Bionic-Badger

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I tried that once with a trustfire that had gone into protected mode and wouldn't come back out. Roasted my thumb when the protection connection shorted. Didn't try it again :(
 

bobhaha

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Wouldn't it be easier to cut around the bottom of the battery and just push the whole thing through?
 

LaZeRz

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Probably, lol

I'l try it with some other cells I have lying around...

Thanks for the feedback :D
 

Kmor2004

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In addition to Lotus's comment, maybe use some other color then black and just use a laser to label the cell, in case you had a bunch of different mAh cells of similar sizes, just a thought.
 

random person

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This.... is not a good idea. That protection circuit in there is there to stop them from starting on fire as you well know. What superior benefit is there to removing this IC that would make it worth the risk?

Eitherway, thanks for posting this. Nice pics and its cool to see the board. ;)
 

LaZeRz

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But the thing is these batteries come without circuits but I accidentaly bought the ones with it...
 

random person

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But the thing is these batteries come without circuits but I accidentaly bought the ones with it...

Ahh very interesting. Haven't paid much attention to that yet. Just ordered my first quad of 18650s and haven't had a chance to test them out. Again, what is the disadvantage of the protection system? (besides being slightly less efficent). Does it limit the peak current draw to something below what we like to use for 2W lasers? Will have to google this some more when I get the chance. If you know offhand feel free to share :)
 
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Fiddy

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  • the protection circuits stop all current flow on higher current laser builds, removing the circuit allows the current to flow.
  • Gets rid of the thin piece of metal than runs from back of the protection circuit to the positive terminal (which poses a short circuit risk)
  • If you had a host that didn't fit the battery by mm's this will do the trick.
 
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Benm

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I'm not that sure the first point is a very good idea - it limits discharge current for a reason too.
 

LaZeRz

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But the point I want to make is these batteries come in unprotected form so effectively these are just unprotected cells with a line down the side....
 
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ndrew2505

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maybe someone should find the pic of the old guy that almost got his hand blown off from an unprotected li-ion battery....
 

LaZeRz

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maybe someone should find the pic of the old guy that almost got his hand blown off from an unprotected li-ion battery....

Holy.... How'd that happen?
 
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