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Question about driver noise while burning. (445nm 3.4W)

Willjoe21

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Mar 25, 2015
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I have a dumb question if you get close to my 3.4W 445 while burning at a distance of let's say 24"-48" I can hear an audible extremely high pitched squeal when I get the focus to its narrowest point where it is at its most powerful burning beam.

What is this? If you move the beam to a fresh spot it stops momentarily then begins again. I have noticed this same thing with my 1W 520nm, and also my 538mW 405nm.

Just curious how the focus/surface the laser hits can affect the driver. It's almost like you start to hear it the second the laser begins to burn and break the surface its aimed at.

Joe
 

Pi R Squared

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:crackup: maybe I am exaggerating a little.

Just curious how the focus/surface the laser hits can affect the driver. It's almost like you start to hear it the second the laser begins to burn and break the surface its aimed at.
It can't, but maybe just the motion of moving the laser could if something is loose or broken. I have never had this happen but there have been several threads where people said this happened, there was a cause explained once but I don't remember what but I think the laser failed, so whatever it is isn't good since they aren't supposed to do that anyway. Hopefully someone that knows more about it will see this.

Alan
 

Cyparagon

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Ripple? The pulsing causes vibration in the
flame and it becomes audible.
Yes. This effect is also noticeable with PWM'd flashlight beams for example. Point them at a black surface, and the black surface hums. The material expands and contracts slightly with each pulse, which causes minute sound waves.
 

Willjoe21

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Mar 25, 2015
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Yes. This effect is also noticeable with PWM'd flashlight beams for example. Point them at a black surface, and the black surface hums. The material expands and contracts slightly with each pulse, which causes minute sound waves.
Ok that makes perfect sense, I hadn't really thougt much about what was going on to the surface being burned. Thanks for that explanation!

Joe
 




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