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properties of wavelengths

Shakenawake

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When I first got into lasers, I thought I would be happy with one color, I was wrong. I soon discovered that different wavelengths have different properties.

my wavelengths
405nm-black light effect
445nm-some effects like the 405, most powerful visible handhelds
532nm-brightest and farthest reaching
635-665nm-flesh penetrating effect

I understand IR lasers are invisible to our eyes, but I am more curious about 473nm and the two most common yellow wavelengths. what about 520nm? Do these wavelengths have any special properties that other colors lack? Basically, if the only thing special is the color itself, I think I can resist adding these wavelengths to my collection. Anyone care to convince me otherwise?
 



norbyx

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Well how about the yellows like the 589nm ... it just looks awsome..
 

ZRaffleticket

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Having a 589nm/593.5nm is described as "holding the sun in your hands" or something like that.
473nm, there's nothing too special about it other than the fact it's a really nice color
520nm is very close to 532nm, however on the single mode 520nm diodes the divergence is the best among diodes IMO. it's a bit more blue in color, however its definitely green.
 
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I, for one, REALLY want a 488nm laser...I love that turquoise!

After I finish my 520nm MS-SSW build, I think it might be time to get into the exotic wavelengths.
 

Shakenawake

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488nm, forgot that one. It would be a good color to get. I may get a 488 before I ever get a 473nm. I was reading about a yellow laser made by combining a red and green laser, the beam could appear more lime colored or more on the orange side of yellow, depending on the surface it was shined on. But this is not a "True yellow laser" as it is not DPSS. There must be something special about these other than the color. Anything that only a yellow laser can do? other than be yellow.

What qualifies a wavelength as exotic? does it just have to be rare? I certainly don't see many places where one can get 520nm, 473nm, 589-594nm, but I see these more often than 488nm
 

norbyx

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From what I have understood reading all over the forum, a wavelenght is exotic because it's rare and expensive. Aparently to make a good yellow laser it demands a high production cost because it is not easy to obtain.
I also immagine that if (for example) DVD's used yellow lasers than costs would have dropped a lot.
Anyhow it is sure nice to have all the available colors, but expensive and quite useless other than being able to show them to friends or guests....
Personally I am just getting started into the laser mania, and yet I already bought almost every wavelenght I could get my hands on.... probably got bite from emotion.
 

IsaacT

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Exotic Wavelengths are, in my opinion, any wavelengths that are not these:

405nm
445nm
450nm
532nm
635nm
650nm

THIS website shows a lot of the wavelength/laser options, although it missed a lot of hobbyist semiconductor lasers.

One type of laser that I really want to own someday is a high powered Argon laser. Waiting to find one that is priced well and then I will take the plunge. Also aiming to start collecting HeNe Lasers. I prefer them to have a bare tube because I want to be able to see the line of plasma inside the tube.
 

norbyx

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So is there any laser diode that can produce a wavelenght lower than 405nm???
 

Shakenawake

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I am pretty sure there are lasers lower than 405nm, but they will be in the ultraviolet range, thus invisible to our eyes just as the IR lasers are. 405nm is already on this fringe
 

mwang

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I believe 375 is the shortest wavelength diode available, even though it is so crazily expensive. You guys forgot 561nm, I like that color too. Also, 685nm is rare and available in diode form. 515nm is also available from osram, they came out with the 520s.
 

Cyparagon

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So you're saying 399nm will be invisible? :p I think 350nm will still be visible. UV LEDs are in the 375nm range.
I can see 365nm (the mercury spectral line) just fine.

"UV" LEDs are usually closer to 410nm if they don't specify a wavelength or even if they say 395nm. 365nm is the other relatively common color.
 

Shakenawake

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I guess I am not sure what the cut-off wavelength is for visibility below 405, but I'd imagine it's within 100nm below...
 
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I can see 365nm (the mercury spectral line) just fine.

"UV" LEDs are usually closer to 410nm if they don't specify a wavelength or even if they say 395nm. 365nm is the other relatively common color.
I'd love to see a link to diodes of this wavelength...As it is, I don't have time to google...
 




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