Welcome to Laser Pointer Forums - discuss green laser pointers, blue laser pointers, and all types of lasers



Politics and General Debates Thread

paul1598419

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 20, 2013
Messages
18,622
Points
113
With the video title, false narrative "Biden FALLS ON HIS FACE after his FOOLISH 'racist theory'" which is taking advantage of the mother ignorance of what "critical race theory" is and why it's important to understand... Sad...

One hundred years ago, on May 31 and June 1 of 1921, white rioters ransacked and set ablaze a wealthy Black neighborhood in northern Tulsa, Oklahoma – a place known as "Black Wall Street," where Black people were business owners, doctors, lawyers and where they were building and accumulating wealth at a time when that was unheard of in much of America.
The massacre, which left hundreds of Black people dead and roughly 10,000 homeless in its immediate aftermath, has haunted families for generations – not only by stunting their family trees but also by stripping them of future opportunities that such a solid foundation would have brought.

"I call on the American people to reflect on the deep roots of racial terror in our Nation and recommit to the work of rooting out systemic racism across our country," President Joe Biden said in a proclamation on Monday, in which he underscored the devastating repercussions the federal highway system and redlining had in making it "nearly impossible" for the neighborhood to recover.

When the president visits Tulsa on Tuesday to mark the century that's passed since the Tulsa race riot and meet survivors and their families, he's set to deliver remarks and acknowledge how federal laws and policies, to this day, stunt the ability of Black communities to thrive.

In doing so, he will effectively deliver a lesson on critical race theory – the term that's roiling conservatives in Congress and statehouses across the country.

And while nearly 80% of Americans have not heard of the term critical race theory or are unsure of whether they have, according to one recent poll, that hasn't stopped some people from getting really, really upset about what they see as the Biden administration's attempt to reckon with the sprawling repercussions of slavery.

Critical race theory traces its origins to a framework of legal scholarship that gained momentum in the 1980s by challenging conventional thinking about race-based discrimination, which for decades assumed that discrimination on the basis of race could be solved by expanding constitutional rights and then allowing individuals who were discriminated against to seek legal remedies. However, some legal scholars pointed out that such solutions – though well-intentioned – weren't effective because they argued, racism is pervasive and baked into the foundation of the U.S. legal system and society as a whole.

Take the landmark case Brown v. Board of Education, for example, in which the Supreme Court ruled in 1954 that separate is not equal and that state laws protecting segregated public schools are unconstitutional. While the ruling gave Black children the right to attend schools that had long prohibited them, it also resulted in some white families enrolling their children in private schools, moving to the suburbs, or redrawing school district boundaries in an effort to resist integration.

Even now, more than half a century after the Brown v. Board decision, efforts are still underway by some wealthy and majority-white communities to create their own school districts, and there exists a $23 billion gap between majority white and majority Black school districts out of which spills an array of inequalities.

Today, critical race theory is used by academic scholars – and not just in law schools – to describe how racism is embedded in all aspects of American life, from health care to housing, economics to education, clean water to the criminal justice system, and more. Those systems, they argue, have been constructed and protected over generations in ways that give white people advantages – sometimes in ways that are not obvious or deliberately insidious but nonetheless result in compounding disadvantages for Black people and other racial and ethnic minorities.

Many Americans, especially white people, believe racism is the product of intentionally bad and biased individuals, but critical race theory purports that racism is systemic and is inherent in much of the American way of life, no matter how far removed we are today from its origins.

Over the last two decades, academic researchers and policymakers have increasingly focused on issues of equity, linking how systems were established in the U.S. with how and why they serve different groups of people differently.

In education, for example, that effort took off after Congress passed No Child Left Behind, which for the first time required states to disaggregate academic achievement data by race, income, and disability status. From there, policymakers began linking the racial makeup of school districts to state and local education funding, or lack thereof, and their broader academic profiles – not just math and reading scores but also access to high-quality teachers, Advanced Placement courses, extracurricular activities, and school counselors, graduation rates and much more.

Today, policymakers are shining a light on glaring racial gaps in a whole host of domestic policy arenas, and as the country reckons with systemic racism and inequality in the wake of George Floyd's death at the hands of a white police officer, the term critical race theory is having a moment in the sun.

Some don't what that sun to shine and would rather bury the past and pretend it never happened...;)

Also, in the 1940s when the USA was preparing to go to war, less than 3% of eligible Black Americans were registered in this country to vote. To this day Blacks are still fighting for their rights to vote.
 



Unown (WILD)

Well-known member
Staff member
Joined
Sep 4, 2020
Messages
859
Points
93
With the video title, false narrative "Biden FALLS ON HIS FACE after his FOOLISH 'racist theory'" which is taking advantage of the mother ignorance of what "critical race theory" is and why it's important to understand... Sad...

One hundred years ago, on May 31 and June 1 of 1921, white rioters ransacked and set ablaze a wealthy Black neighborhood in northern Tulsa, Oklahoma – a place known as "Black Wall Street," where Black people were business owners, doctors, lawyers and where they were building and accumulating wealth at a time when that was unheard of in much of America.
The massacre, which left hundreds of Black people dead and roughly 10,000 homeless in its immediate aftermath, has haunted families for generations – not only by stunting their family trees but also by stripping them of future opportunities that such a solid foundation would have brought.

"I call on the American people to reflect on the deep roots of racial terror in our Nation and recommit to the work of rooting out systemic racism across our country," President Joe Biden said in a proclamation on Monday, in which he underscored the devastating repercussions the federal highway system and redlining had in making it "nearly impossible" for the neighborhood to recover.

When the president visits Tulsa on Tuesday to mark the century that's passed since the Tulsa race riot and meet survivors and their families, he's set to deliver remarks and acknowledge how federal laws and policies, to this day, stunt the ability of Black communities to thrive.

In doing so, he will effectively deliver a lesson on critical race theory – the term that's roiling conservatives in Congress and statehouses across the country.

And while nearly 80% of Americans have not heard of the term critical race theory or are unsure of whether they have, according to one recent poll, that hasn't stopped some people from getting really, really upset about what they see as the Biden administration's attempt to reckon with the sprawling repercussions of slavery.

Critical race theory traces its origins to a framework of legal scholarship that gained momentum in the 1980s by challenging conventional thinking about race-based discrimination, which for decades assumed that discrimination on the basis of race could be solved by expanding constitutional rights and then allowing individuals who were discriminated against to seek legal remedies. However, some legal scholars pointed out that such solutions – though well-intentioned – weren't effective because they argued, racism is pervasive and baked into the foundation of the U.S. legal system and society as a whole.

Take the landmark case Brown v. Board of Education, for example, in which the Supreme Court ruled in 1954 that separate is not equal and that state laws protecting segregated public schools are unconstitutional. While the ruling gave Black children the right to attend schools that had long prohibited them, it also resulted in some white families enrolling their children in private schools, moving to the suburbs, or redrawing school district boundaries in an effort to resist integration.

Even now, more than half a century after the Brown v. Board decision, efforts are still underway by some wealthy and majority-white communities to create their own school districts, and there exists a $23 billion gap between majority white and majority Black school districts out of which spills an array of inequalities.

Today, critical race theory is used by academic scholars – and not just in law schools – to describe how racism is embedded in all aspects of American life, from health care to housing, economics to education, clean water to the criminal justice system, and more. Those systems, they argue, have been constructed and protected over generations in ways that give white people advantages – sometimes in ways that are not obvious or deliberately insidious but nonetheless result in compounding disadvantages for Black people and other racial and ethnic minorities.

Many Americans, especially white people, believe racism is the product of intentionally bad and biased individuals, but critical race theory purports that racism is systemic and is inherent in much of the American way of life, no matter how far removed we are today from its origins.

Over the last two decades, academic researchers and policymakers have increasingly focused on issues of equity, linking how systems were established in the U.S. with how and why they serve different groups of people differently.

In education, for example, that effort took off after Congress passed No Child Left Behind, which for the first time required states to disaggregate academic achievement data by race, income, and disability status. From there, policymakers began linking the racial makeup of school districts to state and local education funding, or lack thereof, and their broader academic profiles – not just math and reading scores but also access to high-quality teachers, Advanced Placement courses, extracurricular activities, and school counselors, graduation rates and much more.

Today, policymakers are shining a light on glaring racial gaps in a whole host of domestic policy arenas, and as the country reckons with systemic racism and inequality in the wake of George Floyd's death at the hands of a white police officer, the term critical race theory is having a moment in the sun.

Some don't what that sun to shine and would rather bury the past and pretend it never happened...;)
From 1921? Seriously? That was so long ago. It was generations ago. Move on. Get over it. It's way in the past. Are we going to start picking and choosing every horrible event in mankind? Imagine if we did that. Suicide rates would skyrocket because people wouldn't be able to handle everything that has happened since mankind was put on this earth. People would freak. No what this really is about isn't the suffering and pain it's about hand picking things that happened long long ago just the push their agenda today. It's pathetic and anyone who supports it is even more pathetic.
I personally don't care what happened in the past. It's over with. I could think back on many things even in my life but that is not good to do and I am not pretending anything hasn't happened simply because I choose not to think about it.
Racism is not inherent. That is total bs. You can simply watch children play with each other to see that. I had black friends in the past. I never thought of them as black until when I got older I learned this concept called "racism". This was adult stuff. Critical race theory ... heh it's critical that it exists because it's a hazard to sanity.
Don't blame me for crap I haven't done. Especially from a bunch of people in the 1920s that I've never met nor care to bother wasting my time thinking about.
Ask any psychiatrist about living in the past. Especially a past you had nothing to do with. They'll all tell you that living in the past is harmful as it is damaging to your mental health and body.

I am so tempted into locking this thread for good because for the last hundreds or so pages have had little to do with actual debate of politics and has only served as an outlet for angry people looking to fight and bicker and insult any party they don't agree with. The amount of insanity today reached previously thought unreachable heights. People have been hauled to the insane asylum for far much less than typical citizens involved in BLM and CRT ect.

I'd rather be in a room with psychopath killers in bikinis that have never washed a day in their lives than anyone from LGBTQ+ or BLM protestors. At least I know where I stand with the convicted killers.
 
Last edited:

skijohn

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 8, 2018
Messages
721
Points
63
From 1921? Seriously? That was so long ago. It was generations ago. Move on. Get over it. It's way in the past. Are we going to start picking and choosing every horrible event in mankind? Imagine if we did that. Suicide rates would skyrocket because people wouldn't be able to handle everything that has happened since mankind was put on this earth. People would freak. No what this really is about isn't the suffering and pain it's about hand picking things that happened long long ago just the push their agenda today. It's pathetic and anyone who supports it is even more pathetic.
I personally don't care what happened in the past. It's over with. I could think back on many things even in my life but that is not good to do and I am not pretending anything hasn't happened simply because I choose not to think about it.
Racism is not inherent. That is total bs. You can simply watch children play with each other to see that. I had black friends in the past. I never thought of them as black until when I got older I learned this concept called "racism". This was adult stuff. Critical race theory ... heh it's critical that it exists because it's a hazard to sanity.
Don't blame me for crap I haven't done. Especially from a bunch of people in the 1920s that I've never met nor care to bother wasting my time thinking about.
Ask any psychiatrist about living in the past. Especially a past you had nothing to do with. They'll all tell you that living in the past is harmful as it is damaging to your mental health and body.

I am so tempted into locking this thread for good because for the last hundreds or so pages have had little to do with actual debate of politics and has only served as an outlet for angry people looking to fight and bicker and insult any party they don't agree with. The amount of insanity today reached previously thought unreachable heights. People have been hauled to the insane asylum for far much less than typical citizens involved in BLM and CRT ect.

I'd rather be in a room with psychopath killers in bikinis that have never washed a day in their lives than anyone from LGBTQ+ or BLM protestors. At least I know where I stand with the convicted killers.
Ohhh I see, so learning about the Civil War, The founding Fathers George Washington and Thomas Jefferson, The Constitution, Columbus discovering America, or even way back to the Romans, or even farther back the Egyptians, and everything in between isn't "living in the past" but instead it's called "learning history" BUT learning about Slavery, or the Massacre of Black Wall Street, well now STOP THE PRESSES! let us not live in the past!

Now, why is there such a huge difference as to call one "learning history" and the other is "living in the past"???

Gee, whatever could it be??? I can't quite put my finger on the difference???

Hummmm... :unsure:

Y8Xf2kBXWFlFjXaGl8sGhH9TwXvU4u51mMGuXyFbzHJrmmTAZHKIo0VGGhw22qv5S6NEHJEDBm1E4VziPp8UeWUHr4gRTKA_banewomen_faces3.jpg


I guess we'll never know... ;)

 
Last edited:

skijohn

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 8, 2018
Messages
721
Points
63

Of course Trump lied! Ex-Trump WH counsel testifies Trump urged him fire Mueller!​



That's what Trump Does!
 

paul1598419

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 20, 2013
Messages
18,622
Points
113
Christopher Wray is testifying today. Louie Gohmert has got to be the stupidest person in the House. He has asked the stupidest questions from people lately. He asked Wray if people at the insurrection on 1/6 were actually not Trump supporters, but others just pretending to be. Wray just told him that that was not anything that he has seen. Two days ago he asked Jennifer Eberlien, associate deputy chief of he US Forest Service, if they could change the moon's orbit to effect climate change.🤣
 
Last edited:

skijohn

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 8, 2018
Messages
721
Points
63
Christopher Wray is testifying today. Louie Gohmert has got to be the stupidest person in the House. He has asked the stupidest questions from people lately. He asked Wray if people at the insurrection on 1/6 were actually not Trump supporters, but others just pretending to be. Wray just told him that that was not anything that he has seen. Two days ago he asked Jennifer Eberlien, associate deputy chief of he US Forest Service, if they could change the moon's orbit to effect climate change.🤣
"change the moon's orbit to effect climate change"??? OMG, are you serious??? :ROFLMAO:

I missed that one! :D

Everyone knows you have to change the orbit of the earth to affect climate change, that's all, 10 feet farther from the sun should do? ;)
 
Last edited:

paul1598419

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 20, 2013
Messages
18,622
Points
113
"change the moon's orbit to effect climate change"??? OMG, are you serious??? :ROFLMAO:

I missed that one! :D

Everyone knows you have to change the orbit of the earth to affect climate change, that's all, 10 feet farther from the sun should do? ;)

Yep, he sure did. In response, Jennifer Eberlien just told him she would have to get back to him on that. :LOL:
 

paul1598419

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 20, 2013
Messages
18,622
Points
113
I find it hilarious that Americans For Limited Government seem to only want to limit it to Republican rule. They have certainly not been deficit hawks going back to Reagan when I started paying close attention to this issue. Even democracy is out the window when it comes to Republicans now. Several have actually proposed that Republican votes are better than any others. :rolleyes:
 

Unown (WILD)

Well-known member
Staff member
Joined
Sep 4, 2020
Messages
859
Points
93
Ohhh I see, so learning about the Civil War, The founding Fathers George Washington and Thomas Jefferson, The Constitution, Columbus discovering America, or even way back to the Romans, or even farther back the Egyptians, and everything in between isn't "living in the past" but instead it's called "learning history" BUT learning about Slavery, or the Massacre of Black Wall Street, well now STOP THE PRESSES! let us not live in the past!

Now, why is there such a huge difference as to call one "learning history" and the other is "living in the past"???

Gee, whatever could it be??? I can't quite put my finger on the difference???

Hummmm... :unsure:

Y8Xf2kBXWFlFjXaGl8sGhH9TwXvU4u51mMGuXyFbzHJrmmTAZHKIo0VGGhw22qv5S6NEHJEDBm1E4VziPp8UeWUHr4gRTKA_banewomen_faces3.jpg


I guess we'll never know... ;)

I grow tired of your reasoning or lack thereof and your sarcasm
 

skijohn

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 8, 2018
Messages
721
Points
63
Ban anyone with a coherent argument that disproves your rationale? :unsure:

3, 2, 1...
 




Top