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Politics and General Debates Thread

skijohn

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Joined
Sep 8, 2018
Messages
608
Points
43
 



paul1598419

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Joined
Sep 20, 2013
Messages
18,470
Points
113
Biden is putting kids in cages or containers . The hypocrisy is astounding.
Biden reopened the same temporary holding facility in Texas but this time it's ok to put kids in cages because of covid.....LOL what a load of shit.

Geese! Biden has been in office just over a month and you are attacking him for not building enough housing facilities yet? If you listened to all the replies by Jen Psaki it is evident that they are working as fast as they can to get these kids into covid safe shelters in order to get them into vetted homes with family or with foster parents. Trump just put them in cages and separated them from their parents. I get that the last administration built nothing to use for an influx of unaccompanied children. Biden is going to get this done as quickly as possible. Not one person said he has put them into cages. That was all Trump.
 

ciscoyao715

Member
Joined
Aug 6, 2009
Messages
61
Points
8
Boy, are they in for a big surprise! :LOL:


Again, You havnt made one logical argument to any of the actual political points people have brought up, this is what liberals do when the have ZERO clue about who they voted for based off an overly emotional and usually mindless opinion. Try to answer these questions and ill consider your IQ above room temp...maybe

1.) How do you feel about Binden still not giving the people the stimulus checks he promised? Trump would have been crucified for this.
2.) How can you even POSSIBLY defend him in approving using the US tax payer money to fund the same f**king lab in WUHAN that started this annoying ass covid virus thats no worse than the yearly flu.
3.) How the fuck can you defend him lifting the trump law that stopped china from having control over parts of our power grid?

Again You go right for Orange man and republicans are bad. I swear we need to give people an IQ test to be allowed to vote. Like youre literally voting for communism and turning the country to a shithole because MSNBC is telling you too.
 

paul1598419

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 20, 2013
Messages
18,470
Points
113
The only question you asked that is not nonsense is about the checks. Congress is getting them through as we post. The House has already passed them and the Senate will take care of it even if Republicans don't vote for it at all. The Orange man did speak earlier today and it looks like he is going to hold Republicans hostage for at least the next year, but he is actually saying you'll have him to deal with in 2024. :LOL:
 

skijohn

Active member
Joined
Sep 8, 2018
Messages
608
Points
43
Again, You havnt made one logical argument to any of the actual political points people have brought up, this is what liberals do when the have ZERO clue about who they voted for based off an overly emotional and usually mindless opinion. Try to answer these questions and ill consider your IQ above room temp...maybe

1.) How do you feel about Binden still not giving the people the stimulus checks he promised? Trump would have been crucified for this.
2.) How can you even POSSIBLY defend him in approving using the US tax payer money to fund the same f**king lab in WUHAN that started this annoying ass covid virus thats no worse than the yearly flu.
3.) How the fuck can you defend him lifting the trump law that stopped china from having control over parts of our power grid?

Again You go right for Orange man and republicans are bad. I swear we need to give people an IQ test to be allowed to vote. Like youre literally voting for communism and turning the country to a shithole because MSNBC is telling you too.
Ok...

The stimulus relief plan, oh the horror!

Stimulus checks
The House bill would provide direct payments worth up to $1,400 per person. A family of four could receive up to $5,600.

Unemployment assistance
The House bill would extend two key pandemic unemployment programs through August 29. It would also increase the federal weekly boost to $400, from the current $300, and continue it for the same time period.
It would lengthen the duration of the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance program to up to 74 weeks, from 50 weeks, and the Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation program to 48 weeks, from 24 weeks.
The former provides benefits to freelancers, gig workers, independent contractors and certain people affected by the pandemic, while the latter increases the duration of payments for those in the traditional state unemployment system.
The President's plan had called for continuing the benefits through the end of September.
Out-of-work Americans will start running out of Pandemic Unemployment Assistance and Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation benefits in mid-March, when provisions in December's $900 billion relief package begin phasing out.
The $300 enhancement also ends in mid-March.

Nutrition assistance
The House plan would extend the 15% increase in food stamp benefits through September, instead of having it expire at the end of June.
It also contains $880 million for the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children, known as WIC, to help increase participation and temporarily improve benefits, among other measures. Biden called for investing $3 billion in the program.
And it would allow states to continue the Pandemic-EBT, which provides families whose children's schools are closed with funding to replace free- and reduced-price meals the kids would have received, through the summer.

Housing aid
The legislation would send roughly $19.1 billion to state and local governments to help low-income households cover back rent, rent assistance and utility bills.
About $10 billion would be authorized to help struggling homeowners pay their mortgages, utilities and property taxes.
It would provide another $5 billion to help states and localities assist those at risk of experiencing homelessness.
Tax credits for families and workers
The legislation beefs up tax credits for families and certain low-income workers for 2021.
In an effort to combat poverty, it would expand the child tax credit to $3,600 for each child under 6 and $3,000 for each child under age 18. Currently, qualifying families can receive a credit of up to $2,000 per child under age 17.
The credit would also become fully refundable so more low-income parents could take advantage of it. Plus, families could receive payments monthly, rather than a lump sum once a year, which would make it easier for them to pay the bills.
The bill also enhances the earned income tax credit for workers without children by nearly tripling the maximum credit and extending eligibility to more people. The minimum age to claim the childless credit would be reduced to 19, from 25, and the upper age limit would be eliminated.
This would be the largest expansion to earned income tax credit since 2009.
Optional paid sick and family leave
Unlike Biden's proposal, the House bill would not reinstate mandatory paid family and sick leave approved in a previous Covid relief package. But it does continue to provide tax credits to employers who voluntarily choose to offer the benefit through October 1.
Last year, Congress guaranteed many workers two weeks pay if they contracted Covid or were quarantining. It also provided an additional 10 weeks of paid family leave to those who were staying home with kids whose schools were closed. Those benefits expired in December.

Education and child care
The bill would provide nearly $130 billion to K-12 schools to help students return to the classroom. Schools would be allowed to use the money to update their ventilation systems, reduce class sizes to help implement social distancing, buy personal protective equipment and hire support staff. It would require that schools use at least 20% of the money to address learning loss by providing extended days or summer school, for example.
The money is also intended to help prevent teacher layoffs next year when some states may be struggling to balance their budgets. The pot of money will remain available through September 2023.
The Democratic bill is in line with what Biden proposed, but calls for more than six times the amount of funding for K-12 schools than a compromise plan offered by a small group of Republican senators.
The House bill now includes nearly $40 billion for colleges. Institutions would be required to spend at least half the money to provide emergency financial aid grants to students.
Altogether, $170 billion would be authorized for K-12 schools and higher education. Last year, Congress approved a total $112 billion between two relief packages that went to K-12 schools and colleges.
The bill would also provide $39 billion to child care providers. The amount a provider receives would be based on operating expenses and is available to pay employees and rent, help families struggling to pay the cost, and purchase personal protective equipment and other supplies.

Health insurance subsidies and Medicaid
The bill would make federal premium subsidies for Affordable Care Act policies more generous and would eliminate the maximum income cap for two years.
Enrollees would pay no more than 8.5% of their income towards coverage, down from nearly 10% now. Also, those earning more than the current cap of 400% of the federal poverty level -- about $51,000 for an individual and $104,800 for a family of four in 2021 -- would become eligible for help.
In addition, the legislation would bolster subsidies for lower-income enrollees, eliminating their premiums completely, and would do the same for those collecting unemployment benefits in 2021.
The bill would also provide assistance for those who want to remain on their employer health insurance plans through COBRA. These laid-off workers would pay only 15% of the premium through the end of September, though that can still prove costly.
Also, the legislation seeks to entice states that have yet to expand Medicaid to low-income adults to do so by boosting their federal Medicaid matching funds by 5 percentage points for two years.
More money for small businesses
The bill would provide $15 billion to the Emergency Injury Disaster Loan program, which provides long-term, low-interest loans from the Small Business Administration. Severely impacted small businesses with fewer than 10 workers will be given priority for some of the money.
It also provides $25 billion for a new grant program specifically for bars and restaurants. Eligible businesses may receive up to $10 million and can use the money for a variety of expenses, including payroll, mortgage and rent, utilities and food and beverages.
The Paycheck Protection Program, which is currently taking applications for second-round loans, would get an additional $7 billion and the bill would make more non-profit organizations eligible.
Another $175 million would be used for outreach and promotion, creating a Community Navigator Program to help target eligible businesses.
Aid to states
The House legislation would provide $350 billion to state and local governments, as well as tribes and territories.
States and the District of Columbia would receive $195.3 billion, while local governments would be sent $130.2 billion to be divided evenly between cities and counties. Tribes would get $20 billion and territories $4.5 billion.
Additional assistance to states has been among the most controversial elements of the congressional rescue packages, with Democrats looking to add to the $150 billion in the March legislation and Republicans resisting such efforts. The December package ultimately dropped an initial call to include $160 billion.

Vaccines and testing
The House bill provides $14 billion to research, develop, distribute, administer and strengthen confidence in vaccines. It would also put $46 billion towards testing, contact tracing and mitigation, including investing in laboratory capacity, community-based testing sites and mobile testing units, particularly in medically underserved areas.
It would also allocate $7.6 billion to hire 100,000 public health workers to support coronavirus response.
The legislation also provides $50 billion to the Federal Emergency Management Agency, with some of the funds going toward expanding vaccination efforts.
The President's plan called for investing $20 billion in a national vaccination program.
 

ciscoyao715

Member
Joined
Aug 6, 2009
Messages
61
Points
8
Ok...

The stimulus relief plan, oh the horror!

Stimulus checks
The House bill would provide direct payments worth up to $1,400 per person. A family of four could receive up to $5,600.

Unemployment assistance
The House bill would extend two key pandemic unemployment programs through August 29. It would also increase the federal weekly boost to $400, from the current $300, and continue it for the same time period.
It would lengthen the duration of the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance program to up to 74 weeks, from 50 weeks, and the Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation program to 48 weeks, from 24 weeks.
The former provides benefits to freelancers, gig workers, independent contractors and certain people affected by the pandemic, while the latter increases the duration of payments for those in the traditional state unemployment system.
The President's plan had called for continuing the benefits through the end of September.
Out-of-work Americans will start running out of Pandemic Unemployment Assistance and Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation benefits in mid-March, when provisions in December's $900 billion relief package begin phasing out.
The $300 enhancement also ends in mid-March.

Nutrition assistance
The House plan would extend the 15% increase in food stamp benefits through September, instead of having it expire at the end of June.
It also contains $880 million for the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children, known as WIC, to help increase participation and temporarily improve benefits, among other measures. Biden called for investing $3 billion in the program.
And it would allow states to continue the Pandemic-EBT, which provides families whose children's schools are closed with funding to replace free- and reduced-price meals the kids would have received, through the summer.

Housing aid
The legislation would send roughly $19.1 billion to state and local governments to help low-income households cover back rent, rent assistance and utility bills.
About $10 billion would be authorized to help struggling homeowners pay their mortgages, utilities and property taxes.
It would provide another $5 billion to help states and localities assist those at risk of experiencing homelessness.
Tax credits for families and workers
The legislation beefs up tax credits for families and certain low-income workers for 2021.
In an effort to combat poverty, it would expand the child tax credit to $3,600 for each child under 6 and $3,000 for each child under age 18. Currently, qualifying families can receive a credit of up to $2,000 per child under age 17.
The credit would also become fully refundable so more low-income parents could take advantage of it. Plus, families could receive payments monthly, rather than a lump sum once a year, which would make it easier for them to pay the bills.
The bill also enhances the earned income tax credit for workers without children by nearly tripling the maximum credit and extending eligibility to more people. The minimum age to claim the childless credit would be reduced to 19, from 25, and the upper age limit would be eliminated.
This would be the largest expansion to earned income tax credit since 2009.
Optional paid sick and family leave
Unlike Biden's proposal, the House bill would not reinstate mandatory paid family and sick leave approved in a previous Covid relief package. But it does continue to provide tax credits to employers who voluntarily choose to offer the benefit through October 1.
Last year, Congress guaranteed many workers two weeks pay if they contracted Covid or were quarantining. It also provided an additional 10 weeks of paid family leave to those who were staying home with kids whose schools were closed. Those benefits expired in December.

Education and child care
The bill would provide nearly $130 billion to K-12 schools to help students return to the classroom. Schools would be allowed to use the money to update their ventilation systems, reduce class sizes to help implement social distancing, buy personal protective equipment and hire support staff. It would require that schools use at least 20% of the money to address learning loss by providing extended days or summer school, for example.
The money is also intended to help prevent teacher layoffs next year when some states may be struggling to balance their budgets. The pot of money will remain available through September 2023.
The Democratic bill is in line with what Biden proposed, but calls for more than six times the amount of funding for K-12 schools than a compromise plan offered by a small group of Republican senators.
The House bill now includes nearly $40 billion for colleges. Institutions would be required to spend at least half the money to provide emergency financial aid grants to students.
Altogether, $170 billion would be authorized for K-12 schools and higher education. Last year, Congress approved a total $112 billion between two relief packages that went to K-12 schools and colleges.
The bill would also provide $39 billion to child care providers. The amount a provider receives would be based on operating expenses and is available to pay employees and rent, help families struggling to pay the cost, and purchase personal protective equipment and other supplies.

Health insurance subsidies and Medicaid
The bill would make federal premium subsidies for Affordable Care Act policies more generous and would eliminate the maximum income cap for two years.
Enrollees would pay no more than 8.5% of their income towards coverage, down from nearly 10% now. Also, those earning more than the current cap of 400% of the federal poverty level -- about $51,000 for an individual and $104,800 for a family of four in 2021 -- would become eligible for help.
In addition, the legislation would bolster subsidies for lower-income enrollees, eliminating their premiums completely, and would do the same for those collecting unemployment benefits in 2021.
The bill would also provide assistance for those who want to remain on their employer health insurance plans through COBRA. These laid-off workers would pay only 15% of the premium through the end of September, though that can still prove costly.
Also, the legislation seeks to entice states that have yet to expand Medicaid to low-income adults to do so by boosting their federal Medicaid matching funds by 5 percentage points for two years.
More money for small businesses
The bill would provide $15 billion to the Emergency Injury Disaster Loan program, which provides long-term, low-interest loans from the Small Business Administration. Severely impacted small businesses with fewer than 10 workers will be given priority for some of the money.
It also provides $25 billion for a new grant program specifically for bars and restaurants. Eligible businesses may receive up to $10 million and can use the money for a variety of expenses, including payroll, mortgage and rent, utilities and food and beverages.
The Paycheck Protection Program, which is currently taking applications for second-round loans, would get an additional $7 billion and the bill would make more non-profit organizations eligible.
Another $175 million would be used for outreach and promotion, creating a Community Navigator Program to help target eligible businesses.
Aid to states
The House legislation would provide $350 billion to state and local governments, as well as tribes and territories.
States and the District of Columbia would receive $195.3 billion, while local governments would be sent $130.2 billion to be divided evenly between cities and counties. Tribes would get $20 billion and territories $4.5 billion.
Additional assistance to states has been among the most controversial elements of the congressional rescue packages, with Democrats looking to add to the $150 billion in the March legislation and Republicans resisting such efforts. The December package ultimately dropped an initial call to include $160 billion.

Vaccines and testing
The House bill provides $14 billion to research, develop, distribute, administer and strengthen confidence in vaccines. It would also put $46 billion towards testing, contact tracing and mitigation, including investing in laboratory capacity, community-based testing sites and mobile testing units, particularly in medically underserved areas.
It would also allocate $7.6 billion to hire 100,000 public health workers to support coronavirus response.
The legislation also provides $50 billion to the Federal Emergency Management Agency, with some of the funds going toward expanding vaccination efforts.
The President's plan called for investing $20 billion in a national vaccination program.
Congrats you can copy and paste lmfao how can you explain him allowing china access to our power grid or the fact that he approved a grant of US tax payer money to the same lab in wuhan that started this fucking joke of a virus in the first place? Try and not copy and paste this time
 

skijohn

Active member
Joined
Sep 8, 2018
Messages
608
Points
43
Congrats you can copy and paste lmfao how can you explain him allowing china access to our power grid or the fact that he approved a grant of US tax payer money to the same lab in wuhan that started this fucking joke of a virus in the first place? Try and not copy and paste this time
Sure what you are talking about is made-up nonsense and has no basis in reality, there's not much more to say about it?

Certainly not worth arguing about because it's not real...
 

ciscoyao715

Member
Joined
Aug 6, 2009
Messages
61
Points
8
Sure what you are talking about is made-up nonsense and has no basis in reality, there's not much more to say about it?
He lifted an executive order that kept China from interfering in our power grid, Biden rescinded it how is that made up non-sense? you people just see what you want and if you see something you dont like you just call it racist to make it go away lmfao
 

skijohn

Active member
Joined
Sep 8, 2018
Messages
608
Points
43
He lifted an executive order that kept China from interfering in our power grid, Biden rescinded it how is that made up non-sense? you people just see what you want and if you see something you dont like you just call it racist to make it go away lmfao

No, Biden executive order did not allow China access to U.S. power grid​

IF YOUR TIME IS SHORT​

• Biden suspended a Trump order barring the use of Chinese electrical equipment in the U.S. power grid, pending a 90-day review. However, the prohibitions against Chinese equipment remain in place.
• There is no evidence that Chinese interference contributed to the power outage in Texas.
See the sources for this fact-check

During a devastating winter blackout in Texas, a conservative group linked the outage to President Joe Biden, claiming that one of his executive orders gave the Chinese Communist Party access to the U.S. power grid.

"Joe Biden is handing our power grid to the Chinese Communist Party," tweeted the conservative activist group Students for Trump on Feb. 16.

The post also includes a quote by the group’s CEO, Charlie Kirk, which reads: "While thousands of Americans are without power because of a faulty energy infrastructure, this is your daily reminder that Joe Biden rescinded a Trump executive order banning Chinese involvement in our power grid."

Other social media users were even more explicit about attributing the Texas outage to Biden’s order.

"Anyone else concerned that 3 weeks ago Joe Biden signed an Executive Order giving China access to the US power grid for 90 days & now Texas and Minneapolis have no power or heat?" reads a tweet.

These tweets refer to the executive order on climate change policy that Biden signed on Jan. 20, 2021.

Is it accurate to say that the order granted China access to the U.S. power grid? No.

Biden’s executive order suspended a directive issued by former President Donald Trump that aimed to limit the use of electrical equipment manufactured by foreign adversaries, like China. However, under Biden’s executive order, the prohibitions against installing foreign utilities in the U.S. power grid remain in place.

We reached out to Kirk through his organization Turning Point USA, but we didn’t receive a response.

Biden suspends Trump executive order
To secure the U.S. power grid from the threat of a cyberattack, Trump issued an executive order on May 1, 2020, called "Securing the United States Bulk-Power System." The order prohibited the use of electrical equipment "designed, developed, manufactured, or supplied, by persons owned by, controlled by, or subject to the jurisdiction or direction of" foreign entities such as China.

Under that order, Trump’s energy secretary, Dan Brouillette, issued a prohibition against U.S. utilities using Chinese electrical equipment.
After taking office in January 2021, Biden signed a flurry of executive orders rescinding Trump policies. One of them, dealing with climate change policy, suspended Trump’s May 1 order for 90 days.

During the 90-day suspension, the energy secretary and White House budget director are directed to take stock of Trump’s executive order and recommend whether to issue a replacement. (Biden’s nominee for budget director has not been confirmed.)

However, according to the Energy Department, the prohibitions on Chinese electrical equipment remain in place while the Trump order is reviewed.

"During this 90-day review period, Responsible Utilities will refrain from installation of bulk-power system electric equipment or programmable components… subject to foreign adversaries’ ownership, control, or influence," the agency wrote on an FAQ page on its website.

No evidence that Chinese interference caused Texas power outage

Like I said, made-up nonsense... Oh, and Trump IS a racist!
 

RedCowboy

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 10, 2015
Messages
10,421
Points
113

House Democrats' $1.9 trillion coronavirus bill wastes taxpayer money, full of pork​

  • Doesn’t open schools despite providing $129 billion for schools as 95% of this money is allocated to be spent in years 2022-2028
  • Allocates over $100 million for Pelosi and Schumer’s pet projects: the Silicon Valley Underground Tunnel and Seaway International Bridge to Canada
  • Provides $135 million to the National Endowment of the Arts
  • Spends $86 billion bailout multi-employer pension plans without any reform
  • Provides $35 billion to subsidize Obamacare premiums
  • Eliminates 1.4 million jobs through their mandated minimum wage hike
  • Allows Planned Parenthood to receive PPP funding
Only 9% of this behemoth 1.9 TRILLION dollar bill is for COVID related items, 91% is NOT COVID related.
 

skijohn

Active member
Joined
Sep 8, 2018
Messages
608
Points
43

House Democrats' $1.9 trillion coronavirus bill wastes taxpayer money, full of pork​

  • Doesn’t open schools despite providing $129 billion for schools as 95% of this money is allocated to be spent in years 2022-2028
  • Allocates over $100 million for Pelosi and Schumer’s pet projects: the Silicon Valley Underground Tunnel and Seaway International Bridge to Canada
  • Provides $135 million to the National Endowment of the Arts
  • Spends $86 billion bailout multi-employer pension plans without any reform
  • Provides $35 billion to subsidize Obamacare premiums
  • Eliminates 1.4 million jobs through their mandated minimum wage hike
  • Allows Planned Parenthood to receive PPP funding
Only 9% of this behemoth 1.9 TRILLION dollar bill is for COVID related items, 91% is NOT COVID related.

Fact-checking whether Democrats’ ‘wish list’ is in $1.9 trillion relief bill​

IF YOUR TIME IS SHORT​

  • The figures listed in the Facebook post for six components of President Joe Biden’s $1.9 trillion relief bill are largely accurate.
  • The post lacks context. For example, the largest of the six — $1.5 billion for Amtrak — was also requested by the Trump administration.
  • The components comprise a small fraction of the $1.9 trillion.
See the sources for this fact-check

An attack ad claims that the American Rescue Plan includes money for a bridge connecting Canada to New York, an underground rail project in Silicon Valley, museums and Native American language preservation, Amtrak, environmental justice grants and family planning organizations like Planned Parenthood.

The ad is in response to President Joe Biden’s $1.9 trillion American Rescue Plan for tackling COVID-19 and related economic challenges. It includes a $1,400-a-person stimulus payment, enhanced unemployment insurance, and a boost for coronavirus vaccination and testing efforts.

It’s also loaded with pork, according to a group founded by Nikki Haley, the former U.S. ambassador to the United Nations and potential contender for the presidency in 2024.

The attack is made in a Facebook post from Stand for America and is headlined, "Democrats’ COVID ‘Stimulus’ Bill Wishlist." It lists six figures, ranging from $1.5 million to $1.5 billion, for spending on things such as underground rail, Amtrak, Native American language preservation, environmental justice and family planning.

The post was flagged as part of Facebook’s efforts to combat false news and misinformation on its News Feed. (Read more about our partnership with Facebook.)

H.R.1319 does include some of the projects as described, but the post lacks context. For example, the largest of the six — $1.5 billion for Amtrak — was also requested by the Trump administration to help the railroad operate during the pandemic.

Stephen Ellis, president of Taxpayers for Common Sense, points out that the amounts in the post account for about $2.2 billion of the $1.9 trillion bill, or about 0.001%.

We sent messages to Stand for America via Facebook and its website asking for information to back up the Facebook post, but did not get a reply.

The six parts of the claim

"$1.5 million for a bridge connecting Canada to New York"
Correct. But the Trump administration made the same request.

The bill would give $1.5 million to the Great Lakes St. Lawrence Seaway Development Corp. "to prevent, prepare for and respond to coronavirus by conducting the operations, maintenance and capital infrastructure activities of the Seaway International Bridge," which connects New York State and Ontario.

In May 2020, the Transportation Department asked for the same amount of money for the bridge because toll revenue had "dramatically decreased" due to decreased traffic from the pandemic, the New York Daily News reported.

"$100 million for underground rail project in Silicon Valley"

Correct.

The bill allots $1.25 billion for federal transit capital investment grants. It does not specify a project in the Silicon Valley.

Stand for America cites a Fox Business news article that says the language of the bill alludes to $112 million going to phase two of the San Francisco Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) expansion. The Washington Post also reported that it’s estimated the expansion will receive about $112 million.

The long-planned six-mile extension would include five miles in a subway beneath downtown San Jose, with construction expected to start in 2022 and the line carrying passengers in 2030, according to the San Francisco Chronicle. The newspaper says the project’s stimulus funding would be $141 million.

"$500 million for museums & Native American language preservation"

Largely correct.

The bill "would appropriate $480 million for grants to fund activities related to the arts, humanities, libraries and museums, and Native American language preservation and maintenance," according to the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office.

The bill appropriates the $480 million this way:

  • $270 million — split between the National Endowment for the Humanities and the National Endowment for the Arts — to provide grants "to prevent, prepare for, respond to and recover from the coronavirus."
  • $200 million to the Institute of Museum and Library Services to carry out the Library Services and Technology Act.
  • $10 million in "emergency grants" to "ensure the survival and continuing vitality of Native American languages during and after the (COVID-19) public health emergency."
Museums have been financially disadvantaged by COVID-19, according to a survey of 850 museum directors by the American Alliance of Museums. The Metropolitan Museum of Art recently made news when its director said it was considering selling artwork to cover operational expenses.

"$1.5 billion for Amtrak, which still has $1 billion in unspent aid"

The $1.5 billion is correct. But it follows similar aid provided by the Trump administration. (The articles that Stand for America cites don’t address whether Amtrak has unspent aid.)

The bill would steer grants totaling $1.5 billion to the National Railroad Passenger Corp. (Amtrak) "to prevent, prepare for and respond to coronavirus": $820.4 million for the northeast corridor and $679.6 million for the national network.

In April 2020, Trump’s transportation department announced it was making more than $1 billion available to Amtrak "to support the railroad’s activities to prevent, prepare for and respond to the spread of" COVID-19.

"$50 million for environmental justice grants"

Correct.

The bill appropriates to the Environmental Protection Agency $50 million for "grants, contracts and other agency activities that implement the environmental justice purposes and objectives" described in "Federal Actions to Address Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low-Income Populations," an executive order signed by President Bill Clinton in 1994; and President Joe Biden’s "Tackling the Climate Crisis at Home and Abroad" executive order.

Biden’s order amended Clinton’s order to create a White House Environmental Justice Interagency Council to "develop a strategy to address current and historic environmental injustice."

"$50 million for ‘family planning’ orgs like Planned Parenthood"

Largely correct.

The bill appropriates $50 million "for making grants and contracts under" the Public Health Service Act, which gives grants and contracts for family planning.

No organization is specified.

The National Family Planning & Reproductive Health Association issued a statement praising the $50 million for Title X.

We rated as a Promise Kept Trump’s pledge to defund Planned Parenthood. His administration enacted a rule that effectively said that any facility receiving federal Title X funding cannot also be an abortion provider. Previously, abortion providers such as Planned Parenthood could receive Title X funds as long as the funds were only used for non-abortion services.

Biden on Jan. 28 directed the Health and Human Services Department to consider whether to rescind the rule.

Our ruling
A Facebook post claimed: "Democrats’ COVID ‘stimulus’ bill wish list" includes money "for a bridge connecting Canada to New York"; an "underground rail project in Silicon Valley"; museums and "Native American language preservation"; Amtrak; "environmental justice grants"; and "‘family planning’ organizations like Planned Parenthood."

The figures listed in the post for six components of Biden’s $1.9 trillion relief bill are largely accurate.
 

RedCowboy

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 10, 2015
Messages
10,421
Points
113
So you agree it's a pork filled bill that needs a lot of refocusing before adding to our enormous debt. very good.

https://www.foxbusiness.com/politics/covid-bill-pays-federal-employees-to-stay-home-with-kids

House Democrats' $1.9 trillion coronavirus bill wastes taxpayer money, full of pork​

  • Doesn’t open schools despite providing $129 billion for schools as 95% of this money is allocated to be spent in years 2022-2028
  • Allocates over $100 million for Pelosi and Schumer’s pet projects: the Silicon Valley Underground Tunnel and Seaway International Bridge to Canada
  • Provides $135 million to the National Endowment of the Arts
  • Spends $86 billion bailout multi-employer pension plans without any reform
  • Provides $35 billion to subsidize Obamacare premiums
  • Eliminates 1.4 million jobs through their mandated minimum wage hike
  • Allows Planned Parenthood to receive PPP funding
Only 9% of this behemoth 1.9 TRILLION dollar bill is for COVID related items, 91% is NOT COVID related.
 

skijohn

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Messages
608
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So you agree it's a pork filled bill that needs a lot of refocusing before adding to our enormous debt. very good.

https://www.foxbusiness.com/politics/covid-bill-pays-federal-employees-to-stay-home-with-kids

House Democrats' $1.9 trillion coronavirus bill wastes taxpayer money, full of pork​

  • Doesn’t open schools despite providing $129 billion for schools as 95% of this money is allocated to be spent in years 2022-2028
  • Allocates over $100 million for Pelosi and Schumer’s pet projects: the Silicon Valley Underground Tunnel and Seaway International Bridge to Canada
  • Provides $135 million to the National Endowment of the Arts
  • Spends $86 billion bailout multi-employer pension plans without any reform
  • Provides $35 billion to subsidize Obamacare premiums
  • Eliminates 1.4 million jobs through their mandated minimum wage hike
  • Allows Planned Parenthood to receive PPP funding
Only 9% of this behemoth 1.9 TRILLION dollar bill is for COVID related items, 91% is NOT COVID related.
No, I don't, The figures listed in the post for six components of Biden’s $1.9 trillion relief bill are largely accurate.

And it's not the "coronavirus bill", It's the Covid-19 relief package. It's much-needed relief for millions of Americans, families, businesses, workers, safely open schools, AND to fight the covid-19 pandemic and everything it has affected, it's ALL RELATED and all of it must be addressed...
 
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RedCowboy

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10,421
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NOPE Only 9% of the Covid-19 relief bill is for actual covid related items, 91% is pure liberal pork, bailing our liberal cities who's failed policy needs to be corrected, not propped up facilitating more of the same is not covid relief.

What does a NEA grant have to do with covid relief ?

What the hell is this ?

$10 million in "emergency grants" to "ensure the survival and continuing vitality of Native American languages during and after the (COVID-19) public health emergency."

You can't just attach the letters " covid " to any old piece of shit and call it covid relief.

How the hell is covid threatening the survival of native American language ? That's pure nonsense. What is 10 Million tax dollars really buying and who benefits ?

$200 million to the Institute of Museum and Library Services to carry out the Library Services and Technology Act.

Again this is not covid relief.

$270 million — split between the National Endowment for the Humanities and the National Endowment for the Arts — to provide grants "to prevent, prepare for, respond to and recover from the coronavirus."

BULLSHIT, this is also NOT covid relief.
 

skijohn

Active member
Joined
Sep 8, 2018
Messages
608
Points
43
76% of Americans support the package as is so you're outnumbered, thank god.

You see a few provisions and don't understand why they are in there and you jump to calling it "pork" or "BULLSHIT"...
 




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