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Pointers and LED TV

epsilon cyclon

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Aug 31, 2021
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I noticed on LED/flat screen TVs laser pointer dot when directed to the TV is absorbed to some degree diminishing it in intensity (subjective). Is there anyway to quantify what that loss of energy there is with the absorption and does any documentation about such a thing exist? Is it then a safer situation?

Also I am seeing an increasing number of presenters that "work" with LED/flat screens now. While the screen can absorb a lot of incoming light, not much can be said for the reflective glass or glass-like material that borders the screen. Isn't this an opportunity to be struck by a reflected beam? In a room full of people this would seem to be a risk and if it is why do these large companies seem to ignore this?

Amazon seems to be ok with such laser products. Isn't that a litmus test for risk right there?
 
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bostjan

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Dec 29, 2011
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Maybe I'm not sure exactly what you mean, but you can measure the absorption of the screen at the wavelength of the laser with a photodiode and an amplifier. There might also be some interference, depending on how the screen is illuminated.

I don't think an item being listed on Amazon or not is a good test for eye safety. I've bought a few IR LD's and modules off of Amazon, and those are certainly not safe for the human eye.

Can you post links to the items or photos or something to help us understand what you are looking at?
 

Mattronium

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Dec 12, 2012
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Your questions are difficult to understand.

Are you inquiring about this issue for a particular purpose, or just curious?
I imagine that most LED screens are not made with laser pointers for presentations in mind.
As far as safety goes, simply using a <5mW pointer (520nm/532nm for best visibility), and being aware of possible reflecting angles would likely suffice.
 




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