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Non visible lasers

sjp770

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Hey,

n00b warning - I have no idea about the different types of lasers!

I was just wondering about infrared lasers or other lasers that might be possible to make that you couldn't see with out special glasses?

The thought was to possibly add illumination downrange for shooting at dusk or later without alerting the target...? I had seen one such device mounted to a Cheytac m200 with nightvision.. but im assuming that nightvision was the requirement.

Is there anything that you could change from invisible to visible with just a plastic filter (i.e some special safety glasses)
 

T_Warne

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As far as what has been declassified and is available to civilians... Sorry, but no.

you can use IR and a common ccd camera.
 

Wolfman29

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I imagine long UV would be capable of changing to visible if the "filter" you wore in front of your eyes was capable of fluorescing to that specific wavelength. And it would absorb the majority of the light, protecting your eyes.
 

Wolfman29

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Heh. No use anyway. We don't have any easily accessible long-UV diodes (YET!).
 

steveclv

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Most nightvision scopes have IR illumination but not a collimated beam (laser).

With suitable lenses, I guess that an IR diode could be adapted but non-visible lasers are incredibly dangerous simply because you can't see the beam/dot and so you need a lot of safety precautions in place before you use them.

So it's possible but I wouldn't recommend it and it does need nightvision.

With UV isn't that wavelength absorbed more than reflected? It was a long time ago since I was in a science lab but I seem to remember it wasn't effective as a long range illuminator.
 
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It can be done with 405, but some of the light is still seen. however some cameras pick it up waaaaaaay better than any human can. The thing is shorter UV lengths may work , but it has the disadvantage of causing florescence in your eye. So if you're shinning near someone THEY will see it if it gets near them even if your in the 360nm range.
 




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