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New review: LZIR808-200 808nm Infrared Invisible Burning Laser Module

The_LED_Museum

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LZIR808-200 808nm Infrared Invisible Burning Portable Laser, retail $51.01 (http://lazerer.com...)
Manufactured by: Lazerer (http://lazerer.com)
Last updated 07-21-11




The LZIR808-200 808nm Infrared Invisible Burning Portable Laser (hereinafter, probably just called a "NIR portable laser" or even just a "laser") is a NIR (Near-Infrared), directly-injected diode laser. That is, it produces NIR laser radiation directly, without the need for messy, fragile nonlinear crystals like those green laser pointers and the amberish-yellow and slightly greenish-blue ones as well.

It uses a pair of RCR2 rechargeable Li:ION (lithium ion) cells -- you just charge them back up when they poop out...never have to run to the store for batteries. However, if you need the laser *RIGHT NOW* and your RCR2 cells are shot, you can pop in a pair of CR2 disposables and get your laser to function properly that way.

It is advertised to output 200mW of laser radiation at 808nm.

This is the reason I call it a "portable laser" on my website instead of a "pointer". Lasers designated as "pointers" must -- by US law anyway -- have a power output that does not exceed 5mW.

You must have the appropriate laser safety eyewear and *USE IT* every time you fire up this studly little laser...you don't want to end up like this guy: --->

This may look funny, but I assure you folks, this is no joke!!!
You can't just bop on down to your local Seven-Eleven, Quick-E-Mart, AM/PM, or other similar convenience store for some "Eyeballs-In-a-Can" when you ruin the ones you have. In a few hundred years perhaps, but not now (2011).

It comes in a handsome aluminum body with a matte black finish.


SIZE



To get the laser to turn on, first be certain that the furnished RCR2 cells are charged and installed. If they aren't, then install them (see directly below), and THEN you can activate this laser

Aim the laser well-away from your face.
Press & release the tailcap button to turn the laser on; do the same thing to deactivate it.

The focus is easily adjustable from just a few millimeters from the exit aperture to infinity by simply rotating the bezel (head). Unlike some other focusable lasers, doing this does not leave the head feeling "wobbly" or loose.



To change/charge the batteries in your NIR laser, unscrew and remove the tailcap, and set it aside.

Tip the used cells out of the barrel and into your hand, and recharge them.

Insert two newly-charged RCR2 rechargable Li:ION cells or two CR2 lithium primary (disposable) cells into the barrel, orienting them so that their flat-ends (-) negatives go in first. This is the opposite of how batteries are installed in most flashlights, so please pay attention to polarity here.

Screw the tailcap back on, and be done with it.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

To charge the RCR2 cells, place them in the charger, orienting them so their nipple-ends (+) positives face on the top of the charger.

Plug the charger into any standard (in the United States) two- or three-slot 110 volts to 130 volts AC 60Hz receptacle.

A red light on the charger should now come on; this indicates charging is in progress. When the RCR2 cells have reached full charge, the light on the charger will turn from red to green.

At this point, unplug the charger, remove the charged cells from the charging cradle, and install them in the laser as directed above.

Current usage measures 398mA (disposable CR2 cells) and 399mA (rechargeable RCR2 cells) on my DMM's 4A scale.



***EXTREMELY IMPORTANT!!!***
This laser has a fairly large amount of {vulgar slang term for male nads} to it (measured at 338mW!!!) and the beam is nearly invisible to the unaided eye, so you ***DEFINITELY*** do not want to shine it into your eyes, other people's eyes, pets' eyes, for that matter, the eyes of any person or animal you encounter.
Eye damage can occur faster than the blink reflex can protect them, regardless of what species' eyes you irradiate with this laser. So just don't do it.

And para los motivos de Cristo (and for heaven sakes and for Pete sakes and for your sakes too) do not shine this laser at any vehicle, whether ground-based like a motorcycle, car, or truck, or air-based like a helicopter, airplane, or jet.

The biggest downside to this laser is the fact that while this is clearly a CDRH Class IIIb laser (making it fairly dangerous!!!), there are no safety features at all that are normally required in Class IIIb lasers; e.g., there is no "emissions" indicator, no startup delay, no interlock of ANY type, and no mechanical beam shutter. This laser behaves like a Class IIIa laser pointer in this regard, which I believe is a rather severe no-no!!!

Having said that, there is something else that pisses me off about this laser -- though not as much as the two 445nm blue lasers I recently tested.
It's that duty cycle recommendation -- the instructional material states the following (no changes to grammar or syntax were made):

"Don' t operate it continuously more than 3 minutes every time" {note no period where one would normally go, and note the extra spaces in the word "Don't"). No "cooling" (off) period is shown; though I would presume that it would be no less than 3 minutes (180 seconds).





Beam terminus photograph of this unique laser (collimating lens ass'y in place) on the target at 12".



Beam terminus photograph of this unique laser (collimating lens ass'y removed) on the target.
Laser was held just a couple of inches from the target so that the camera could resolve ("see") the NIR laser radiation.



Beam terminus photograph on a wall at ~10'.
It's that pinkish spot that the red arrow is pointing to.



Beam terminus photograph (collimating lens in place) on the reactive part of a Pocket View-It® IR Detector Card



Beam terminus photograph (collimating lens removed) on the reactive part of a Pocket View-It® IR Detector Card



Beam terminus photograph (collimating lens in place) on the reactive part of a Pocket View-It® IR Detector Card; camera's exposure reduced by -2 stops to help prevent imaging blooming.



Power output with collimating lens in place (CR2 primary {disposable} cells): 255mW.



Power output with collimating lens removed (CR2 primary {disposable} cells): 338mW.



Power output with collimating lens in place (RCR2 secondary {rechargeable} cells): 266mW.



Power output with collimating lens removed (RCR2 secondary {rechargeable} cells): 345mW.

All four measurements were made using my new
LaserBee 2.5W USB Laser Power Meter w/Thermopile.



Spectrographic analysis of the laser diode in this product.
Wavelength appears to be ~808nm, which is ***WELL*** within specification for the type of laser diode used in this laser.



Same as above; but spectrometer's response narrowed to a band between 800nm and 820nm.
This shows that the wavelength is in fact 806.01nm and the spectral line halfwidth is ~3.30nm.



Spectrographic analysis of this laser after three minutes of continuous operation.
This shows that the wavelength is now 807.91nm and the spectral line halfwidth is ~2.30nm.

USB2000 Spectrometer graciously donated by P.L.




Beam cross-sectional analysis with beam widened (collimating lens removed; fast {X} axis).



Beam cross-sectional analysis with beam widened (collimating lens removed; slow {Y} axis).

Images made using the ProMetric System by Radiant Imaging.




210 second (3½ minute) power output stability analysis; using the logging software furnished with my LaserBee 2.5W USB Laser Power Meter w/Thermopile.





Video showing this laser smoking some black electrical tape.

This video is approximately 4.76165346570 megabytes (4,853,967 bytes) in length; dial-up users please be aware.
It will take no less than twenty three minutes to load at 48.0Kbps.




This is a video showing this laser unsuccessfully attempting to nock the Syma S107G R/C Coaxial Helicopter out of the sky by irradiating and overloading its IR sensor. When the heli does rapidly lose altitude toward the end of this video, the cause was my mishandling the Tx (transmitter), not the laser.

That music you hear is the song "13" by Anthrax. This laser and heli are not sound-sensitive; the audio may be ignored or even muted if it pisses you off or if you aren't a metalhead and hate this type of music yet still want to see the laser try to shoot down the heli.

This video is approximately 3.41003473386 megabytes (3,601,729 bytes) in length; dial-up users please be aware.
It will take no less than seventeen minutes to load at 48.0Kbps.




Brief video of the LZIR808-200 808nm Infrared Invisible Burning Portable Laser irradiating a piece of GITD (Glow In The Dark) material that's already been "charged" by another source of shortwave visible radiation (~442nm royal blue). Note that the spot brightens significantly; if this were some thin material like GITD paper, you'd almost certainly see a darker area where the laser's NIR (near-infrared) 806nm radiation had been striking it because the GITD properties were depleted in the areas exposed to NIR radiation (at significantly longer wavelengths than the excitation wavelength range).

That music you hear is the song "R2-D2 (Lives in my Butt)" by the Rochester NY. USA comedy punk synth band Worm Quartet. This laser is not sound-sensitive; the audio may be ignored or even muted if it ticks you off.

This video is approximately 1.83327653458 megabytes (2,015,857 bytes) in length; dial-up users please be aware.
It will take no less than nine minutes to load at 48.0Kbps.


Laser beam causing higher level of glow in a GITD (Glow In The Dark) glass square; this is why IR radiation depletes GITD faster than having no radiation at all impinging upon it.



Brief video of the LZIR808-200 808nm Infrared Invisible Burning Portable Laser irradiating a piece of GITD (Glow In The Dark) material that's already been "charged" by another source of shortwave visible radiation (~442nm royal blue). Note that the spot brightens significantly and then becomes dimmer than the surrounding area after it moves off. This is because the GITD properties were depleted in the areas exposed to NIR radiation (at significantly longer wavelengths than the excitation wavelength range).

That music you hear is the song "Architect of Fear Intro" by...guess who it is...come on, I* know you know this one...





If you guessed Hozay Feliaciano then ¡¡¡PARA NO DE LOS MOTIVOS DE CRISTO!!!
It's Raven, you silly goose!!!
"Raven" the NWOBHM (New Wave Of British Heavy Metal), not Raven Symoan or however the F you spell the douche's name.
This laser is not sound-sensitive; the audio may be ignored or even muted if it pisses you off.

This video is approximately 7.49237624761 megabytes (7,670,143 bytes) in length; dial-up users please be aware.
It will take no less than forty seven minutes to load at 48.0Kbps.



Darker spots in a GITD sheet; these are where it was irradiated with this laser.



Stability analyses of the LZIR808-200 808nm Infrared Invisible Burning Portable Laser, first shown irradiating the sensor of the USB2000 Spectrometer for three minutes (where you can see the wavelength lengthen slightly), then irradiating the photoreactive region of a Pocket View-It® IR Detector Card with anti-Stokes phosphor that requires no optical "charging" prior to irradiation (where you can see the color change) and does not "poop out" with prolonged exposure. Finally, there is a graph produced by the LaserBee 2.5W USB Laser Power Meter w/Thermopile over a period of 3:30 that shows no power degradation. So I'm still uncertain as to why the color on the IR detector changes (this is definitely repeatable; it isn't just a one-time fluke).

This video contains the same content as http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EbBWz2O_I5s but the audio portion is not present because not everybody appreciates music in their laser videos.

This video is approximately 33.09445732457 megabytes (35,335,665 bytes) in length; dial-up users please be aware.
It will take no less than one hundred sixty five (!) minutes to load at 48.0Kbps.



Video of this laser vs. a balloon.

This video is approximately 1.76775634789 megabytes (1,955,263 bytes) in length; dial-up users please be aware.
It will take no less than eight minutes to load at 48.0Kbps.




TEST NOTES:
Test unit was purchased on Ebay on 06-10-11 (or "10 Jun 2011" if you prefer) and was received at 4:44pm PDT on 06-30-11 (or "30 Jun 2011").

It actually came on the 29th, but I was not home to sign for the parcel so a "We Re-Deliver" notice was left in my incoming mail receptacle.



UPDATE: 00-00-00



PROS:
Powerful enough to burn, destroy, and punch small holes in thingss
Beam spot is *SLIGHTLY* visible, and will register rather strongly on many digital cameras
Can use both primary (disposable) CR2 cells and secondary (rechargeable) RCR2 cells
Labelled properly for both wavelength and approx. power output


CONS:
No safety features required on a CDRH Class IIIb laser in the United States (this is what nocked the most stars off its rating!)
Has a somewhat "chintzy" feel to it
Really sticky, nasty "goop" is present on the bezel threads



MANUFACTURER: Laserer
PRODUCT TYPE: NIR (Near-Infrared)-emitting diode laser
LAMP TYPE: Unknown-type high-power NIR (808nm) laser diode
No. OF LAMPS: 1
BEAM TYPE: Adjustable from very narrow spot to medium flood
SWITCH TYPE: Click on/off button on tailcap
CASE MATERIAL: Aluminum
BEZEL: Metal; laser & lens recessed into its end
BATTERY: 2x RCR2 Li:ION rechargeable cells or 2x CR2 lithium primary (disposable) cells
CURRENT CONSUMPTION: 398mA
WATER-RESISTANT: Very light splatter-resistance at maximum
SUBMERSIBLE: ¡¡¡PARA NO DE LOS MOTIVOS DE CRISTO!!!

ACCESSORIES: 2x RCR2 cells, charger, hard-sided storage case, small lanyard
SIZE: 124mm L x 21.50mm D
WEIGHT: Unknown/not equipped to weigh
COUNTRY OF MANUFACTURE: China
WARRANTY: 30 days

PRODUCT RATING:




Update 07-05-11: Changed laser's name, added two URLs, added a beam terminus photograph.

Update 07-06-11: Added a video of an attempt to nock an R/C helicopter out of the air with this laser.

Update 07-08-11: Added a video of this laser depleting GITD materal.

Update 07-09-11: Added a video of multiple stability analyses of this laser.

Update 07-17-11: Added a video of this laser failing to destroy a balloon.

Update 07-20-11: Added a short-term stability analysis.

Update 07-21-11: Added the warranty period.
 
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