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ArcticMyst Security by Avery

My little collection of flashlights

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1000 Lumen red LED flashlight, IP65 waterproof level, the number of nanometers was not mentioned, how many nanometers will it be?

LED flashlight 20,000 Lumen, IP67 waterproof level, updated XHP70 LED, digital display

UV 365nm black lens LED flashlight, 20W with 480mw intensity, made of P50 composed of 4 cores
 

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Congratulations on your flashlight collection. I have many as well, but don't include them as part of my collection as this is a laser pointer forum. But, I get it. ;)
 

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Congratulations on your flashlight collection. I have many as well, but don't include them as part of my collection as this is a laser pointer forum. But, I get it. ;)
The red one, how many nm will it be? If placed the red LED in a 12mm module collimated with a glass lens, can it burn a match?
 

CurtisOliver

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The red one, how many nm will it be? If placed the red LED in a 12mm module collimated with a glass lens, can it burn a match?
LED's are not monochromatic light sources so these will have a broad spectrum. Red LED's usually are centred around 630nm or 660nm. Is this light pure red, or a orangey red?
No, you cannot expect to put an LED into a module and burn with it.
Lasers are coherent and can be focused more tightly. For an LED to burn it would require a lot of optical output.
 

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LED's are not monochromatic light sources so these will have a broad spectrum. Red LED's usually are centred around 630nm or 660nm. Is this light pure red, or a orangey red?
No, you cannot expect to put an LED into a module and burn with it.
Lasers are coherent and can be focused more tightly. For an LED to burn it would require a lot of optical output.
To look at it, it is bright red, but as you can see in the photo, if pointed somewhere, perhaps I was wrong to point it at the white wall?
It has a red/orange color with a hint of yellow.
So what lens is needed to burn an LED?
 
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To look at it, it is bright red, but as you can see in the photo, if pointed somewhere, perhaps I was wrong to point it at the white wall?
It has a red/orange color with a hint of yellow.
So what lens is needed to burn an LED?
It seems that you are asking the same question Curtis answered. LEDs don't burn. Their light source is not coherent. Much better to use a 1 watt laser diode if burning is what you are trying to do.
 

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It seems that you are asking the same question Curtis answered. LEDs don't burn. Their light source is not coherent. Much better to use a 1 watt laser diode if burning is what you are trying to do.
Curtis reply me :

LED's are not monochromatic light sources so these will have a broad spectrum. Red LED's usually are centred around 630nm or 660nm. Is this light pure red, or a orangey red?
No, you cannot expect to put an LED into a module and burn with it.
Lasers are coherent and can be focused more tightly. For an LED to burn it would require a lot of optical output.

I replay to Curtis :


To look at it, it is bright red, but as you can see in the photo, if pointed somewhere, perhaps I was wrong to point it at the white wall?
It has a red/orange color with a hint of yellow.
So what lens is needed to burn an LED?
 
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My point is still the same. If you want to burn something with light you will need at least a 1 watt laser to do so. The LEDs aren't coherent light and can therefore not do do what you want.
 

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My point is still the same. If you want to burn something with light you will need at least a 1 watt laser to do so. The LEDs aren't coherent light and can therefore not do do what you want.
I've researched a bit about this thing about being able to burn or not, thank you for the explanation, but apart from the Wicked Laser Torch which burns, being a powerful OSRAM LED, I found the same potential in the IMALENT LED torches, there is the The latest model the MS32 which has 200,000 is spectacular, it lights up from the point where you turn it on until it lights up Tutankhamun's tomb,
even in this case are we talking about non-coherence?

Brand IMALENT
Product Code MS32
LED Type 32 pieces of American CREE XHP70 2nd LEDs
Batteries Required Battery pack(21700-4000mAh*12)
Luminous Flux Up To 200000 Lumens
Run Time Up To 345h
Intensity 655000cd (Max.)
Distance 1618m (Max.)
 

Encap

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You apparently don't comprehend/understand Light, Lasers, LEDs or English---
LEDs do not produce coherent light,.
Your uneducated daydreams are just that - daydreams.

PS Wicked Lasers FlashTorch does not use any LEDs, it uses a OSRAM HLX64623 12V 100W Halogen bulb which get hot.
 
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¸¸¸

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You apparently don't comprehend/understand Light, Lasers, LEDs or English---
LEDs do not produce coherent light,.
Your uneducated daydreams are just that - daydreams.

PS Wicked Lasers FlashTorch does not use any LEDs, it uses a OSRAM HLX64623 12V 100W Halogen bulb which get hot.
You're absolutely right, I don't understand many things, but I'm here to learn, with the hope that my ignorance won't last long, otherwise I'll only make a bad impression in everyone's eyes.
The same goes for the Wicked FlashTorch, I thought it had an LED, but instead it has a halogen bulb, that's why it overheats?
 
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I've researched a bit about this thing about being able to burn or not, thank you for the explanation, but apart from the Wicked Laser Torch which burns, being a powerful OSRAM LED, I found the same potential in the IMALENT LED torches, there is the The latest model the MS32 which has 200,000 is spectacular, it lights up from the point where you turn it on until it lights up Tutankhamun's tomb,
even in this case are we talking about non-coherence?

Brand IMALENT
Product Code MS32
LED Type 32 pieces of American CREE XHP70 2nd LEDs
Batteries Required Battery pack(21700-4000mAh*12)
Luminous Flux Up To 200000 Lumens
Run Time Up To 345h
Intensity 655000cd (Max.)
Distance 1618m (Max.)

You would have a better chance of burning with a soldering iron. Sure anything that gets hot enough will burn, but light needs to be coherent to burn well at a distance.
 

farbe2

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Not sure why everybody insists that LEDs aren’t able to burn things.
That’s just not true!

Curtis is right, LEDs are light sources without coherence.
However that just means the light behaves differently. It still can very much burn things.

It isn’t necessary to have coherent light to burn things. Afterall it’s very possible to burn things with the sun light. Every played with a magnifying lens and ants?

However the problem is: the LED is much bigger in size than a laser diodes emitting area.

And due to physics: the bigger the light source, the worse it can be concentrated to a small point.
That’s where lasers shine ;)
It’s small point while focused makes it much easier to reach enough power density to be able to burn things.

So LEDs produce less energy dense focus spots than lasers.

It also depends on what you want to burn.
Things with good absorption (black things) are easier than others. Thermal conductivity also plays a roll.

So it’s very much a difficult question of „which lens“ because it highly depends on source many other variables that aren’t easy to figure out.

Generally speaking: use a as short as possible focus length lens with as big as possible diameter. Big diameter to „catch“ all the light, short focal length to concentrate the spot as much as possible.


(BTW you also don’t need 1W lasers to burn stuff, 200mW out of a SM diode is plenty for easy to burn things)
 
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Not sure why everybody insists that LEDs aren’t able to burn things.
That’s just not true!

Curtis is right, LEDs are light sources without coherence.
However that just means the light behaves differently. It still can very much burn things.

It isn’t necessary to have coherent light to burn things. Afterall it’s very possible to burn things with the sun light. Every played with a magnifying lens and ants?

However the problem is: the LED is much bigger in size than a laser diodes emitting area.

And due to physics: the bigger the light source, the worse it can be concentrated to a small point.
That’s where lasers shine ;)
It’s small point while focused makes it much easier to reach enough power density to be able to burn things.

So LEDs produce less energy dense focus spots than lasers.

It also depends on what you want to burn.
Things with good absorption (black things) are easier than others. Thermal conductivity also plays a roll.

So it’s very much a difficult question of „which lens“ because it highly depends on source many other variables that aren’t easy to figure out.

Generally speaking: use a as short as possible focus length lens with as big as possible diameter. Big diameter to „catch“ all the light, short focal length to concentrate the spot as much as possible.


(BTW you also don’t need 1W lasers to burn stuff, 200mW out of a SM diode is plenty for easy to burn things)

Try burning wood at more than 10 feet with an LED. Sure the sun is not coherent, but it still needs to be focused to a spot to burn anything. Those LEDs get hot enough to burn without using their light. And trying to focus incoherent light at a distance is a royal pain. I have burned black plastic using far less than a 200 mW laser....but it needs to be focused to a tiny spot at about an inch way from the target. Anything that get hot enough will burn, just not at an appreciable distance.
 

farbe2

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LEDs get hot enough to burn without using their light

It really depends on the flashpoint but thats usually not true. Most LEDs have a max Tj of way below 150°C which is no where near enough to burn anything.
LEDs can put out a huge amount of light so even though their emitting area is huge, they can still be used to burn stuff.

Try burning wood at more than 10 feet with an LED.
That really depends on what led and optic is used, High power phatlight or puny 3w cree xpg?
We could start calculating things, physics states: Conservation of etendue.

You can focus leds to even smaller spots than their emitter size area, it just depends on your optical system.
However you will decrease depth of field doing so.
Its a simple matter of beam parameter product, exactly the same thing that governs the focusabillity of lasers.
 

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Referring to Encap's response, perhaps that is the way to go if you intend to "burn" something at close and long range.
Therefore NOT a powerful LED, but a halogen bulb, or a series of powerful halogen bulbs, which the longer they remain on the more "fiery" they become, and if collimated with a converging lens, can emit a single beam of light in degrees of burn, a bit like what is done with the diode block [array diode] which, if used only with stock lenses, creates a wide beam; if collimated with a large converging lens, you can actually see the union of each single beam and all together they actually form a sort of elongated triangle.
 




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