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My First Decent Heatsink on a Lathe!

Wolfman29

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Hey everyone. I just got back from the student machine shop working on a heatsink for my AA MXDL host for a LPC-815.

Anyone, so I figured I would post some pictures! I don't have the diode in the bad boy yet, but it'll be my... finest... creation yet, I hope. Going to run it off a single 14500 battery using a flexdrive, probably set it at 250mW or so output power (just going to adjust current until I get that), and, with this hefty heatsink, it should be able to go... forever. Hopefully, anyway!

And now what you have all been waiting for, pictures!

So the front view, with the fins.
1.jpeg

The back view, with that little ridge there to fit perfectly into the pill that the host comes with.
2.jpeg

And finally, the gal with her big nose! This heatsink is pretty damn hefty though, and with the help of the fins, I am hoping for no duty cycle.
3.jpeg

I polished it as best I could, but I couldn't manage to get a mirror finish on it... at least not in the time I was taking. But as you can see, it reflects pretty damn well! Anyway, what do you guys think? I'm going to try to become another one of the forum's machinists, as we seem to be slightly lacking lately (Moh, etc.).
 

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Would a heatsink that has fins likened to a processor heatsink (obviously 360 degrees around the diode and able to fit in a handheld) fair well against just a solid cylinder of copper / ally
 

Wolfman29

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Certainly. The solid cylinder is a good method for decent length duty cycles, because the alloy can absorb some of the heat, thus lowering the total temperature increase, however, it will still be limited. The point of fins is that, with greater surface area, more of the heat can be dissipated. I would think a heatsink with much less volume but huge surface area would be extraordinarily more effective than a solid hunk of copper.
 

Wolfman29

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Thanks mate! I know I will be making at least one custom host... not sure how I am going to do that, considering I don't know how to single-point thread...! Nonetheless, someone said they were going to commission a host from me around Christmas time, so there's that.
 
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Answer my quesstiiiooooooooonnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn

:D
 
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Certainly. The solid cylinder is a good method for decent length duty cycles, because the alloy can absorb some of the heat, thus lowering the total temperature increase, however, it will still be limited. The point of fins is that, with greater surface area, more of the heat can be dissipated. I would think a heatsink with much less volume but huge surface area would be extraordinarily more effective than a solid hunk of copper.

So how come everyone doesn't make these instead.

I take it they're more time consuming?
 

chipdouglas

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@misanthrop.... all heatsinks have their purpose.. a finned heat sink would not do well inside of a flashlight host. nor would a finned heatsink do better than a solid one with a tec... finned sinks need flowing air to work properly. while they do have more surface area, that surface area is perpendicular to the hosts body, thus not allowing it to transfer heat propberly.

michael.
 
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@misanthrop.... all heatsinks have their purpose.. a finned heat sink woul not do well inside of a flashlight host. nor would a finned heatsink do better than a solid one with a tec... finned sinks need flowing air to work properly. while the do have more surface area, that surface area is pependicular to the hosts body, thus not allowing it to transfer heat propberly.

michael.
Ok... well how about a host where the fins are exposed.



Edit: Sorry for thread hijack.
 
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chipdouglas

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there are a few of those... one new one i have seen on the forums is the sirius by deadeyemo.

but i doubt it cools superiorly. it doesn't have a fan to move fresh air over the fins. it has a lot of mass though. so it is a decent host for high powered builds.

michael.
 
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there are a few of those... one new one i have seen on the forums is the sirius by deadeyemo.

but i doubt it cools superiorly. it doesn't have a fan to move fresh air over the fins. it has a lot of mass though. so it is a decent host for high powered builds.

michael.
Link? can't seem to find anything.
 
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I just cleaned up my work area yesterday :D I'm getting it ready for the small things i'll be doing (finishing CNC items that I order)

yes, I watch satellite TV while machining :D

as you can see all of my stuff is from Harbor freight, even the miniature grinder with a buffing wheel for polishing and a drill press for $75. I love harbor freight.
 

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