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Microscope with 445 and 532

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I have a 200x microscope and i was wondering what cool things i could do with it? Like is it possible to burn things that wouldn't normally be possible since the energy is being focused into such a small area? Or would passing my 445 or 532 through the microscope do nothing at all? My 532 is 150mw Endeavor and my 445 is 400mw. The microscope is like a straight tube and uses a mirror for light. I would like to get your opinions before i try anything out.
 

Hemlock_Mike

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At such close focal lengths, you would instantly foul the lens. Why not take pictures using monochrome light?

HMike
 
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At such close focal lengths, you would instantly foul the lens. Why not take pictures using monochrome light?

HMike
Do you mean i would ruin the laser's lens or the microscope's lens? Also what do you mean take pictures using monochrome light? Sorry i am am still fairly new to lasers
 

Hemlock_Mike

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Sending a laser beam down a microscope tube would place the FP sooo close to the target that all the smoke and spatter would trash the lens. Instead, Use the laser light (especilly 405) to illuminate and photograph stuff through the microscope.

HMike
 
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Sending a laser beam down a microscope tube would place the FP sooo close to the target that all the smoke and spatter would trash the lens. Instead, Use the laser light (especilly 405) to illuminate and photograph stuff through the microscope.

HMike
oh,ok you mean shine the laser through bottom of the microscope to make the image come out the top?
 
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oh,ok you mean shine the laser through bottom of the microscope to make the image come out the top?
Yep, that's the idea anyway... Whatever you do though, don't shine it DIRECTLY up through the microscope, you'll probably kill your eyes. I'd just use it as a light, unfocused, pointing at the sample, not up the lens.

Laser light is monochromatic, meaning it is only one color... As opposed to white light, which is made up of an infinite number of colors. This is useful in science. I'm not really sure how. One way, I guess, is that monochromatic light isn't susceptible to chromatic aberrations, where the lenses separate the colors of the light, giving a blue tint to one side and a red tint to the other side.. Here's an example: File:Chromatic aberration (comparison).jpg - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

There's also neat things you can do with blu-ray (405nm) light. Since it's close to ultraviolet, it can cause a number of organic compounds to fluoresce. All sorts of everyday objects glow different colors when exposed to blu-ray light.
 
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Yep, that's the idea anyway... Whatever you do though, don't shine it DIRECTLY up through the microscope, you'll probably kill your eyes. I'd just use it as a light, unfocused, pointing at the sample, not up the lens.

Laser light is monochromatic, meaning it is only one color... As opposed to white light, which is made up of an infinite number of colors. This is useful in science. I'm not really sure how. One way, I guess, is that monochromatic light isn't susceptible to chromatic aberrations, where the lenses separate the colors of the light, giving a blue tint to one side and a red tint to the other side.. Here's an example: File:Chromatic aberration (comparison).jpg - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

There's also neat things you can do with blu-ray (405nm) light. Since it's close to ultraviolet, it can cause a number of organic compounds to fluoresce. All sorts of everyday objects glow different colors when exposed to blu-ray light.
oh,ok cool! Thanks for the info. But i really just want to see how much better lasers are at burning with a microscope. I imagine 400mw through a microscope could be intense.
 




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